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  1.  89
    Intransitivity and future generations: Debunking Parfit's mere addition paradox.Kai M. A. Chan - 2003 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):187–200.
    Duties to future persons contribute critically to many important contemporaneous ethical dilemmas, such as environmental protection, contraception, abortion, and population policy. Yet this area of ethics is mired in paradoxes. It appeared that any principle for dealing with future persons encountered Kavka's paradox of future individuals, Parfit's repugnant conclusion, or an indefensible asymmetry. In 1976, Singer proposed a utilitarian solution that seemed to avoid the above trio of obstacles, but Parfit so successfully demonstrated the unacceptability of this position that Singer (...)
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  2.  48
    The golden rule and the potentiality principle: Future persons and contingent interests.Kai M. A. Chan - 2004 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):33–42.
    Duties to future persons are central to numerous key ethical issues including contraception, abortion, genetic selection, treatment of the environment, and population control. Nevertheless, we still seem to be lacking Parfit's 'Theory X', a general theory of beneficence whose appropriateness extends to future generations. Starting from the Golden Rule, R. M. Hare purportedly derived counterintuitive duties to potential people and 'the potentiality principle'. However, I argue that Hare's derivation involves a hidden and unjustifiable extension from TGR, and show how the (...)
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  3. Human diets and animal welfare: The illogic of the larder. [REVIEW]Gaverick Matheny & Kai M. A. Chan - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (6):579-594.
    Few moral arguments have been made against vegetarian diets. One exception is the “Logic of the Larder:” We do animals a favor by purchasing their meat, eggs, and milk, for if we did not purchase these products, fewer animals would exist. This argument fails because many farm animals have lives that are probably not worth living, while others prevent a significant number of wild animals from existing. Even if this were not so, the purchase of animal products uses resources that (...)
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  4.  8
    The Death of Our Planet’s Species. [REVIEW]Kai M. A. Chan - 2005 - Environmental Ethics 27 (4):433-436.
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  5.  24
    The Death of Our Planet’s Species. [REVIEW]Kai M. A. Chan - 2005 - Environmental Ethics 27 (4):433-436.
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