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  1.  16
    Moral Expertise: New Essays From Theoretical and Clinical Bioethics.Jamie Carlin Watson & Laura K. Guidry-Grimes (eds.) - 2018 - Springer International Publishing.
    This collection addresses whether ethicists, like authorities in other fields, can speak as experts in their subject matter. Though ethics consultation is a growing practice in medical contexts, there remain difficult questions about the role of ethicists in professional decision-making. Contributors examine the nature and plausibility of moral expertise, the relationship between character and expertise, the nature and limits of moral authority, how one might become a moral expert, and the trustworthiness of moral testimony. This volume engages with the growing (...)
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  2.  8
    Applying Nonideal Theory to Bioethics: Living and Dying in a Nonideal World.Elizabeth Victor & Laura K. Guidry-Grimes (eds.) - 2021 - New York: Springer.
    This book offers new essays exploring concepts and applications of nonideal theory in bioethics. Nonideal theory refers to an analytic approach to moral and political philosophy (especially in relation to justice), according to which we should not assume that there will be perfect compliance with principles, that there will be favorable circumstances for just institutions and right action, or that reasoners are capable of being impartial. Nonideal theory takes the world as it actually is, in all of its imperfections. Bioethicists (...)
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    Introduction to Nonideal Theory and Its Contribution to Bioethics.Elizabeth Victor & Laura K. Guidry-Grimes - 2021 - In Elizabeth Victor & Laura K. Guidry-Grimes (eds.), Applying Nonideal Theory to Bioethics: Living and Dying in a Nonideal World. Springer. pp. 3-15.
    At its core, nonideal theory is an attempt not only to address issues of justice, but it also provides us a lens through which we can articulate our limitations as knowers and reasoners, the ways in which we are relational in our autonomy needs, and the ways in which we are deeply dependent upon institutions and social supports for our agency and identities. Bringing this lens into bioethics means shifting our orientation in our scholarship and our practice. This shift will (...)
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