Results for 'Stephen Brain'

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  1.  8
    Measurement of Auditory Brain Function in Cochlear Implant Recipients Using MEG.Johnson Blake, Meng David & Crain Stephen - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  2.  5
    Auditory Envelope Following Responses in the Mature and Developing Human Brain.Tang Huizhen, Brock Jon, Crain Stephen & Johnson Blake - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  3.  9
    Eduard I. Kolchinskii. Так Вспоминается … [So I Remember …]. 572 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. St. Petersburg: Nestor-History, 2014. P̶1,380. [REVIEW]Stephen Brain - 2016 - Isis 107 (3):679-680.
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  4. Maria A. Rogacheva. The Private World of Soviet Scientists From Stalin to Gorbachev. Xi + 211 Pp., Figs., Notes, Bibl., Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. £75 . ISBN 9781107196360. [REVIEW]Stephen Brain - 2019 - Isis 110 (2):436-437.
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  5.  7
    Stephen T. Casper and Delia Gavrus, The History of the Brain and Mind Sciences. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press, 2017. Pp. 310. ISBN 978-1-5800-46595-3. £95.00. [REVIEW]Roger Smith - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Science 51 (3):531-532.
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  6. What Does It Mean to Be a Mechanism? Stephen Morse, Non-Reductivism, and Mental Causation.Katrina L. Sifferd - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-17.
    Stephen Morse seems to have adopted a controversial position regarding the mindbody relationship: John Searle’s non-reductivism, which claims that conscious mental states are causal yet not reducible to their underlying brain states. Searle’s position has been roundly criticized, with some arguing the theory taken as a whole is incoherent. In this paper I review these criticisms and add my own, concluding that Searle’s position is indeed contradictory, both internally and with regard to Morse's other views. Thus I argue (...)
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  7.  16
    Foundational Issues in Human Brain Mapping.Stephen José Hanson & Martin Bunzl (eds.) - 2010 - Bradford.
    The field of neuroimaging has reached a watershed. Brain imaging research has been the source of many advances in cognitive neuroscience and cognitive science over the last decade, but recent critiques and emerging trends are raising foundational issues of methodology, measurement, and theory. Indeed, concerns over interpretation of brain maps have created serious controversies in social neuroscience, and, more important, point to a larger set of issues that lie at the heart of the entire brain mapping enterprise. (...)
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  8.  31
    Commentary on the Concept of Brain Death Within the Catholic Bioethical Framework.Joseph L. Verheijde & Michael Potts - 2010 - Christian Bioethics 16 (3):246-256.
    Since the introduction of the concept of brain death by the Ad Hoc Committee of the Harvard Medical School to Examine the Definition of Brain Death in 1968, the validity of this concept has been challenged by medical scientists, as well as by legal, philosophical, and religious scholars. In light of increased criticism of the concept of brain death, Stephen Napier, a staff ethicist at the National Catholic Bioethics Center, set out to prove that the whole- (...) death criterion serves as good evidence for death in the Catholic bioethical framework, on the grounds that when whole-brain death has occurred the soul has already departed from the body. Opponents have argued that (1) brain death does not disrupt the somatic integrative unity and coordinated biological functioning of a living organism and (2) clinical tests outlined in the practice guidelines for determining brain death lack sufficient power to exclude persisting function and fail to detect elements of the brain that, although currently functionless, may retain potential for recovery under conditions of optimal medical care. It is therefore possible that heart-beating organ procurement from patients with impaired consciousness is de facto a concealed practice of active euthanasia and physician-assisted death, both of which, either concealed or overt, the Catholic Church opposes. (shrink)
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  9.  8
    When Is Deep Brain Stimulation a Medical Benefit, and What Is Required for Consent?Sven Nyholm & Stephen M. Campbell - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (3):150-152.
    Hübner and White argue that we should not administer DBS to psychopathic prisoners. While we are sympathetic to their conclusion, we argue that the authors’ two central arguments for this conclusion are problematic. Their first argument appeals to an overly restrictive conception of individual medical benefit: namely, that an individual medical benefit must alleviate subjective suffering. We highlight cases that clearly constitute individual medical benefits although there is no relief of subjective suffering. The second argument depends on an overly restrictive (...)
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  10.  3
    The History of the Brain and Mind Sciences.Alfred Freeborn - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (3):145-154.
    This review article critically surveys the following literature by placing it under the historiographical banner of ‘the history of the brain and mind sciences’: Fernando Vidal and Francisco Ortega, Being Brains: Making the Cerebral Subject ; Katja Guenther, Localization and its Discontents: A Genealogy of Psychoanalysis & the Neuro Disciplines ; Stephen Casper and Delia Gavrus, The History of the Brain and Mind Sciences: Technique, Technology, Therapy ; Jonna Brenninkmeijer, Neurotechnologies of the Self: Mind, Brain and (...)
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  11. "Monsters on the Brain: An Evolutionary Epistemology of Horror".Stephen Asma - 2014 - Social Research: An International Quarterly (N.4).
    The article discusses the evolutionary development of horror and fear in animals and humans, including in regard to cognition and physiological aspects of the brain. An overview of the social aspects of emotions, including the role that emotions play in interpersonal relations and the role that empathy plays in humans' ethics, is provided. An overview of the psychological aspects of monsters, including humans' simultaneous repulsion and interest in horror films that depict monsters, is also provided.
     
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  12.  9
    What Does It Mean to Be a Mechanism? Stephen Morse, Non-Reductivism, and Mental Causation.Katrina L. Sifferd - 2017 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 11 (1):143-159.
    Stephen Morse seems to have adopted a controversial position regarding the mindbody relationship: John Searle’s non-reductivism, which claims that conscious mental states are causal yet not reducible to their underlying brain states. Searle’s position has been roundly criticized, with some arguing the theory taken as a whole is incoherent. In this paper I review these criticisms and add my own, concluding that Searle’s position is indeed contradictory, both internally and with regard to Morse's other views. Thus I argue (...)
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  13.  69
    Image and Brain: The Resolution of the Imagery Debate.Stephen M. Kosslyn - 1994 - MIT Press.
    This long-awaited work by prominent Harvard psychologist Stephen Kosslyn integrates a twenty-year research program on the nature of high-level vision and mental ...
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  14.  59
    Brain and Language: A Commentary.Stephen E. Toulmin - 1971 - Synthese 22 (May):369-395.
  15. The Complementary Brain: From Brain Dynamics to Conscious Experiences.Stephen Grossberg - 2004 - In Christian Kaernbach, Erich Schroger & Hermann Müller (eds.), Psychophysics Beyond Sensation: Laws and Invariants of Human Cognition. Psychology Press. pp. 417-449.
  16.  5
    Brain Circuits Ancient and Modern.Stephen F. Walker - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):531-531.
    I support the application of the “evolution as tinkering” idea to vocalization and emphasize that some of the subcortical parts of the brain circuits used for speech organs retain features common to nonprimate mammals, and in some cases to lower vertebrates, pointing up the importance of cortical evolution as suggested by MacNeilage.
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  17.  38
    Pains, Brain States and Scientific Identities.Stephen Williams - 1978 - Mind 87 (January):77-92.
  18.  19
    Linking Brain to Mind in Normal Behavior and Schizophrenia.Stephen Grossberg - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):90-90.
    To understand schizophrenia, a linking hypothesis is needed that shows how brain mechanisms lead to behavioral functions in normals, and also how breakdowns in these mechanisms lead to behavioral symptoms of schizophrenia. Such a linking hypothesis is now available that complements the discussion offered by Phillips & Silverstein (P&S).
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  19.  7
    Misleading Asymmetries of Brain Structure.Stephen F. Walker - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):240-241.
    I do not disagree with the argument that human-population right-handedness may in some way be a consequence of the population-level left-lateralization of language. But I suggest that the human functional lateralization is not dependent on the structural left-right brain asymmetries to which Corballis refers.
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  20.  3
    Brain Feedback and Adaptive Resonance in Speech Perception.Stephen Grossberg - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):332-333.
    The brain contains ubiquitous reciprocal bottom-up and top-down intercortical and thalamocortical pathways. These resonating feedback pathways may be essential for stable learning of speech and language codes and for context-sensitive selection and completion of noisy speech sounds and word groupings. Context-sensitive speech data, notably interword backward effects in time, have been quantitatively modeled using these concepts but not with purely feedforward models.
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  21. A New Visualization of the Mind-Brain Relationship.Stephen Harrison - 1989 - In The Case for Dualism. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia.
     
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  22. The Link Between Brain Learning, Attention, and Consciousness.Stephen Grossberg - 1999 - Consciousness and Cognition 8 (1):1-44.
    The processes whereby our brains continue to learn about a changing world in a stable fashion throughout life are proposed to lead to conscious experiences. These processes include the learning of top-down expectations, the matching of these expectations against bottom-up data, the focusing of attention upon the expected clusters of information, and the development of resonant states between bottom-up and top-down processes as they reach an attentive consensus between what is expected and what is there in the outside world. It (...)
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  23.  72
    Adaptationism – How to Carry Out an Exaptationist Program.Paul W. Andrews, Steven W. Gangestad & Dan Matthews - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):489-504.
    1 Adaptationism is a research strategy that seeks to identify adaptations and the specific selective forces that drove their evolution in past environments. Since the mid-1970s, paleontologist Stephen J. Gould and geneticist Richard Lewontin have been critical of adaptationism, especially as applied toward understanding human behavior and cognition. Perhaps the most prominent criticism they made was that adaptationist explanations were analogous to Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories. Since storytelling is an inherent part of science, the criticism refers to the (...)
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  24.  8
    Interaction-Dominant Causation in Mind and Brain, and Its Implication for Questions of Generalization and Replication.Sebastian Wallot & Damian G. Kelty-Stephen - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (2):353-374.
    The dominant assumption about the causal architecture of the mind is, that it is composed of a stable set of components that contribute independently to relevant observables that are employed to measure cognitive activity. This view has been called component-dominant dynamics. An alternative has been proposed, according to which the different components are not independent, but fundamentally interdependent, and are not stable basic properties of the mind, but rather an emergent feature of the mind given a particular task context. This (...)
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  25.  7
    Is There a Place for CPR and Sustained Physiological Support in Brain-Dead Non-Donors?Stephen D. Brown - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):679-683.
    This article addresses whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation and sustained physiological support should ever be permitted in individuals who are diagnosed as brain dead and who had held previously expressed moral or religious objections to the currently accepted criteria for such a determination. It contrasts how requests for care would normally be treated in cases involving a brain-dead individual with previously expressed wishes to donate and a similarly diagnosed individual with previously expressed beliefs that did not conform to a (...)-based conception of death. The paper first focuses narrowly on requests for CPR and then expands its scope to address extended physiological support. It describes how refusing the brain-dead non-donor's requests for either CPR or extended support would represent enduring harm to the antemortem or previously autonomous individual by negating their beliefs and self-identity. The paper subsequently discusses potential implications of policy that would allow greater accommodations to those with conscientious objections to currently accepted brain-based death criteria, such as for cost, insurance, higher brain formulations and bedside communication. The conclusion is that granting wider latitude to personal conceptions around the definition of death, rather than forcing a contested definition on those with valid moral and religious objections, would benefit both individuals and society. (shrink)
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  26.  6
    How Does a Brain Build a Cognitive Code?Stephen Grossberg - 1980 - Psychological Review 87 (1):1-51.
  27.  34
    Brain Death, Souls, and Integrated Functioning: Reply to Verheijde and Potts.Stephen Napier - 2013 - Christian Bioethics 19 (1):25-39.
    Recently, Verheijde and Potts (2011) have called into question the whole-brain death (WBD) criterion and, in particular, have taken issue with my admittedly limited defense of WBD. I would like to thank Verheijde and Potts for their comments and for identifying key points in the debate that need further clarification and defense. This article is an attempt to provide such clarification and to focus on Verheijde and Potts’s key argument against me and other proponents of WBD. The structure of (...)
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  28.  9
    Brain Metaphors, Theories, and Facts.Stephen Grossberg - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):97-98.
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  29.  14
    Realistic Constraints on Brain Color Perception and Category Learning.Stephen Grossberg - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):495-496.
    Steels & Belpaeme (S&B) ask how autonomous agents can derive perceptually grounded categories for successful communication, using color categorization as an example. Their comparison of nativism, empiricism, and culturalism, although interesting, does not include key biological and technological constraints for seeing color or learning color categories in realistic environments. Other neural models have successfully included these constraints.
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  30.  6
    Schizophrenia, Not Depression, as a Result of Depleted Brain Norepinephrine.Stephen T. Mason - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):113-114.
  31. The Complementary Brain: Unifying Brain Dynamics and Modularity.Stephen Grossberg - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (6):233-246.
  32.  23
    A Computational Analysis of Mental Image Generation: Evidence From Functional Dissociations in Split-Brain Patients.Stephen M. Kosslyn, Jeffrey D. Holtzman, Martha J. Farah & Michael S. Gazzaniga - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (3):311-341.
  33.  11
    Lateralization of Brain Activation in Fluent and Non-Fluent Preschool Children: A Magnetoencephalographic Study of Picture-Naming.Paul F. Sowman, Stephen Crain, Elisabeth Harrison & Blake W. Johnson - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  34.  18
    Biased Belief in the Bayesian Brain: A Deeper Look at the Evidence.Ben M. Tappin & Stephen Gadsby - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 68:107-114.
  35.  6
    Brain Imaging in the Courtroom: The Quest for Legal Relevance.Stephen J. Morse - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (2):24-27.
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  36.  41
    What is the Most Interesting Part of the Brain?Timothy Ej Behrens, Peter Fox, Angie Laird & Stephen M. Smith - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (1):2-4.
  37.  48
    Crimson Brain, Red Mind: Yablo on Mental Causation.Edward T. Cox - 2008 - Dialectica 62 (1):77–99.
    Stephen Yablo offers a solution to the problem of mental causation by claiming that the physical is a determinate of the mental's determinable, and therefore the mental and physical do not compete for causal relevance. I present Yablo's solution and argue that the mental‐physical relation cannot meet three necessary conditions for determination. That relation fails to meet the requirements that determinates of the same determinable be incompatible and that no property can be a determinate of more than one determinable. (...)
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  38.  10
    Crimson Brain, Red Mind: Yablo on Mental Causation.Edward T. Cox - 2008 - Dialectica 62 (1):77-99.
    Stephen Yablo offers a solution to the problem of mental causation by claiming that the physical is a determinate of the mental's determinable, and therefore the mental and physical do not compete for causal relevance. I present Yablo's solution and argue that the mental‐physical relation cannot meet three necessary conditions for determination. That relation fails to meet the requirements that determinates of the same determinable be incompatible and that no property can be a determinate of more than one determinable. (...)
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  39.  16
    Brain, Body, and Society: Bioethical Reflections on Socio-Historical Neuroscience and Neuro-Corporeal Social Science.Stephen Lyng - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):25-26.
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  40.  2
    The Choroid Plexus in the Rise, Fall and Repair of the Brain.Dwaine F. Emerich, Stephen J. M. Skinner, Cesario V. Borlongan, Alfred V. Vasconcellos & Chistopher G. Thanos - 2005 - Bioessays 27 (3):262-274.
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  41.  21
    Melissa M. Littlefield;, Jenell M. Johnson . The Neuroscientific Turn: Transdisciplinarity in the Age of the Brain. Xiii + 254 Pp., Illus., Index. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2012. $75. [REVIEW]Stephen Jacyna - 2013 - Isis 104 (4):867-867.
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  42.  13
    Mind, Brain, and Free Will, by Richard Swinburne. [REVIEW]C. Stephen Evans - 2014 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (1):105-108.
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  43.  2
    The Independent and Shared Mechanisms of Intrinsic Brain Dynamics: Insights From Bistable Perception.Teng Cao, Lan Wang, Zhouyuan Sun, Stephen A. Engel & Sheng He - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  44.  5
    Changes in Aspects of Social Functioning Depend Upon Prior Changes in Neurodisability in People with Acquired Brain Injury Undergoing Post-Acute Neurorehabilitation.Dónal G. Fortune, R. Stephen Walsh, Brian Waldron, Caroline McGrath, Maurice Harte, Sarah Casey & Brian McClean - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  45.  7
    Of Means and Ends: Mind and Brain Science in the Twentieth Century.Stephen T. Casper - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (1):1-7.
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  46.  5
    Neurophilosophy As The Route to A Unified Theory of The Mind-Brain.Stephen Mills - 1987 - Irish Philosophical Journal 4 (1-2):161-175.
  47.  1
    Oscillatory Brain Responses Reflect Anticipation During Comprehension of Speech Acts in Spoken Dialog.Rosa S. Gisladottir, Sara Bögels & Stephen C. Levinson - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  48. Visual Mental Images in the Brain: Current Issues.Stephen M. Kosslyn & Lisa M. Shin - 1994 - In Martha J. Farah & G. Ratcliff (eds.), The Neuropsychology of High-Level Vision. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 269--296.
     
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  49.  1
    How Do Materials Exchange Between Blood and Nerve Cells in the Brain?Stephen W. Kuffler & John G. Nicholls - 1965 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 9 (1):69-76.
  50. The Brain Project.Stephen Jones - manuscript
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