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    The Virtues of Scientific Practice: MacIntyre, Virtue Ethics, and the Historiography of Science.Daniel J. Hicks & Thomas A. Stapleford - 2016 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 107 (3):499-72.
    “Practice” has become a ubiquitous term in the history of science, and yet historians have not always reflected on its philosophical import and especially on its potential connections with ethics. In this essay, we draw on the work of the virtue ethicist Alasdair MacIntyre to develop a theory of “communal practices” and explore how such an approach can inform the history of science, including allegations about the corruption of science by wealth or power; consideration of scientific ethics or “moral economies”; (...)
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  2. Shaping Knowledge About American Labor: External Advising at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in the Twentieth Century.Thomas A. Stapleford - 2010 - Science in Context 23 (2):187-220.
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  3. Jacques G. S. J. Van Maarseveen;, Paul M. M. Klep;, Ida H. Stamhuis .The Statistical Mind in Modern Society: The Netherlands, 1850–1940.Volume 1: Official Statistics, Social Progress, and Modern Enterprise.Volume 2: Statistics and Scientific Work. 920 Pp., Illus., Tables, Bibl., Indexes. Amsterdam: Aksant Academic Publishers, 2008. €59.90. [REVIEW]Thomas A. Stapleford - 2011 - Isis 102 (1):195-197.
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  4. Building Chicago Economics: New Perspectives on the History of America's Most Powerful Economics Program.Robert Van Horn, Philip Mirowski & Thomas A. Stapleford (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Over the past forty years, economists associated with the University of Chicago have won more than one-third of the Nobel prizes awarded in their discipline and have been major influences on American public policy. Building Chicago Economics presents the first collective attempt by social science historians to chart the rise and development of the Chicago School during the decades that followed the Second World War. Drawing on new research in published and archival sources, contributors examine the people, institutions and ideas (...)
     
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