James O'Shea University College Dublin
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  • Faculty, University College Dublin

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Jim O'Shea, School of Philosophy, University College Dublin. Research areas: Hume, Kant, epistemology, Wilfrid Sellars, pragmatism.
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  1. James R. O'Shea (2012). Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: An Introduction and Interpretation. Acumen.
    Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (1781) remains a landmark work of philosophy and one that most students will encounter at some point in their studies. At nearly seven hundred pages of detailed and complex argument it is a demanding and intimidating read. James O’Shea’s introduction to the Critique seeks to make it less so. Aimed primarily at students coming to the book for the first time, it provides step-by-step analysis in clear, unambiguous prose. The conceptual problems Kant sought to (...)
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  2. James R. O'Shea (2012). 'The 'Theory Theory' of Mind and the Aims of Sellars' Original Myth of Jones'. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):175-204.
    Recent proponents of the ‘theory theory’ of mind often trace its roots back to Wilfrid Sellars’ famous ‘myth of Jones’ in his 1956 article, ‘Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind’. Sellars developed an account of the intersubjective basis of our knowledge of the inner mental states of both self and others, an account which included the claim that such knowledge is in some sense theoretical knowledge. This paper examines the nature of this claim in Sellars’ original account and its relationship (...)
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  3. James R. O'Shea (2011). How to Be a Kantian and a Naturalist About Human Knowledge: Sellars’s Middle Way. Journal of Philosophical Research 36 (March):327–59.
    The contention in this paper is that central to Sellars’s famous attempt to fuse the “manifest image” and the “scientific image” of the human being in the world was an attempt to marry a particularly strong form of scientific naturalism with various modified Kantian a priori principles about the unity of the self and the structure of human knowledge. The modified Kantian aspects of Sellars’s view have been emphasized by current “left wing” Sellarsians, while the scientific naturalist aspects have been (...)
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  4. James R. O'Shea (2011). Introduction: Naturalism, Normativity, and the Space of Reasons. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (3):313-315.
    (2010). Introduction: Naturalism, Normativity, and the Space of Reasons. International Journal of Philosophical Studies: Vol. 18, Naturalism, Normativity, and the Space of Reasons, pp. 313-315. doi: 10.1080/09672559.2010.494434.
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  5. James R. O'Shea (2011). Normativity and Scientific Naturalism in Sellars' 'Janus-Faced' Space of Reasons. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (3):459-471.
    The thought of Wilfrid Sellars has figured prominently in recent discussions of the relationship between naturalism and normativity . On the one hand, some have appealed to Sellars' philosophy in defence of the thesis that what he called the normative 'space of reasons' is in some sense sui generis and irreducible to the natural causal order described by the natural sciences. On the other hand, others have exploited equally central aspects of Sellars' philosophy in defence of the seemingly incompatible project (...)
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  6. James R. O'Shea (2010). ‘Conceptual Thinking and Nonconceptual Content: A Sellarsian Divide’. In James R. O'Shea & Eric Rubenstein (eds.), Self, Language, and World: Problems from Kant, Sellars, and Rosenberg. Ridgeview Publishing.
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  7. James R. O'shea (2010). Having a Sensible World in View: McDowell and Sellars on Perceptual Experience. Philosophical Books 51 (2):63-82.
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  8. James R. O'Shea (2010). Review of Bernhard Weiss, Jeremy Wanderer (Eds.), Reading Brandom: On Making It Explicit. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (12).
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  9. James R. O'Shea & Eric Rubenstein (eds.) (2010). Self, Language, and World: Problems From Kant, Sellars, and Rosenberg. Ridgeview Publishing Co..
  10. James R. O'Shea (2009). On the Structure of Sellars's Naturalism with a Normative Turn. In Willem A. DeVries (ed.), Empiricism, Perceptual Knowledge, Normativity, and Realism: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars. Oxford University Press.
     
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  11. James R. O'Shea (2007). Wilfrid Sellars: Naturalism with a Normative Turn. Polity Press.
    The work of the American philosopher Wilfrid Sellars continues to have a significant impact on the contemporary philosophical scene. Providing a lively examination of Sellars work through the central problem of what it means to be a human being in a scientific world, this book will be a valuable resource for all students of philosophy.
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  12. James O'Shea (1999). Review: Langton, Kantian Humility: Our Ignorance of Things in Themselves. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7:253-257.
     
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  13. James R. O'Shea (1997). The Needs of Understanding: Kant on Empirical Laws and Regulative Ideals. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 5 (2):216 – 254.
    This article examines the relationship in Kant between transcendental laws and empirical laws (focusing on causal laws), and then brings a particular interpretation of that issue to bear on familiar puzzles concerning the status of the regulative maxims of reason and reflective judgment. It is argued that the 'indeterminate objective validity' possessed by the regulative maxims derives ultimately from strictly constitutive demands of understanding.
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  14. James R. O'Shea (1996). Hume's Reflective Return to the Vulgar. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 4 (2):285 – 315.
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