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  1.  9
    Beheadings and Self-Portraits in Caravaggio’s Work - The Faces of the Self-Awareness.Augustin Cupșa - 2024 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 12 (2):65-86.
    The present study aims to investigate the psychological mechanisms beneath the change in the facial expression of some of the beheaded characters in Caravaggio’s works, starting from The Head of Medusa, from the artist’s youth, and reaching David with the Head of Goliath, a mature workpiece, searching the continuity between them through a series of self-portraits/ self-insertions of the artist in his work. The psychodynamic analysis is limited by the constitution of its practice to the study of the process of (...)
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  2.  4
    Envisager Méduse. Condensation et métamorphose dans la Tête de Méduse de Caravage.Olivier Dubouclez - 2024 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 12 (2):141-175.
    Various elements suggest that not only Medusa’s beheading, but also her metamorphosis is present on the parade shield that Caravaggio painted in 1597-1598 and that his patron, Cardinal del Monte, offered to the Grand Duke of Tuscany, Ferdinando de’ Medici. Scholars have recently insisted that the famous rotella shares many features with an engraving by Cornelis Cort, now attributed to Antonio Salamanca, a possible copy of a lost work by Leonardo. Interestingly, this engraving comes with a description of Medusa’s metamorphosis, (...)
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  3.  5
    Présentation du numéro - Caravage – l’image en mouvement.Olivier Dubouclez - 2024 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 12 (2):9-10.
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  4.  10
    Diego Lucci, John Locke’s Christianity.Remus Gabriel Manoilă - 2024 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 12 (2):183-186.
  5.  5
    Jérémie Koering, Les Iconophages. Une histoire de l’ingestion des images.Elsa Maury - 2024 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 12 (2):179-182.
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  6.  7
    Caravaggio’s The Crucifixion of St. Peter - Spectatorship, Martyrdom and the Iconic Image in Early Modern Italy.Simen K. Nielsen - 2024 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 12 (2):11-64.
    This paper explores conflations of martyrdom, spectatorship, and image theory in Caravaggio’s Crucifixion of St. Peter (1601). It argues that Caravaggio employs an “iconic” visual formula as a response to the pressures of a post-Tridentine poetics. Through these strategies, an iconography of immediacy and presence is paired with a sacrificial subject-matter. This merging united witness and visual experience in the shape of the sacred image. Martyrdom, as both a historical and representational phenomenon of early modern sociality and culture, invoked the (...)
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  7.  4
    Caravaggio’s Martha and Mary Magdalene in a Post-Trent Context.Daniel M. Unger - 2024 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 12 (2):87-109.
    In his painting of Martha and Mary Magdalene, Caravaggio depicted the two sisters of Lazarus as engaged in a serious conversation. On the one hand Martha is rebuking Mary Magdalene. On the other hand, Mary is responding in that she turns a mirror towards her older sister. The aim of this article is to elucidate how this reciprocal conversation reflects post-Trent propaganda. Martha represents a group of believers that remained within the Catholic Church but did not embrace the changes implemented (...)
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  8.  9
    Narrative and Temporal Ambiguity in Caravaggio and Rembrandt’s Supper at Emmaus.Michela Young - 2024 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 12 (2):111-139.
    Caravaggio and Rembrandt have often been considered together in light of their realism and use of chiaroscuro, as propounded in the 2006 exhibition “Caravaggio-Rembrandt”. This article explores another unifying characteristic of their paintings, ambiguity. By specifically considering the artists’ construction of narrative ambiguity in their first versions of The Supper at Emmaus, from their respective climates of Protestant Holland and Counter-Reformation Italy, it analyses the significance of the pictorial and temporal strategies employed for the exegesis of the Emmaus narrative. It (...)
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