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  1.  2
    Demanding Existence: Dewey and Beauvoir on Habit, Institution, and Freedom.Susan Bredlau - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (2):141.
    We often consider the relations we develop with things—for example, with a cellphone—and even the relations we develop with people—for example, with a teacher—in instrumental terms. We set some end for ourselves and we understand our relations with things and people as either facilitating or obstructing our attainment of this end. We think, in other words, that while our attainment of the ends we set will depend on these relations, our very setting of ends will not, or that while the (...)
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  2.  4
    Adorno, Benjamin, and Natural Beauty on “This Sad Earth”.Jordan Daniels - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (2):159.
    At the heart of environmental aesthetics is the premise that the aesthetic experience of nature should not be directly cribbed from the aesthetic experience of art objects. That Theodor Adorno would agree may surprise those who know him as the arch-theorist of modernist art, even those who specialize in Adornian aesthetics. While Adorno’s nuanced discussion of natural beauty has received some attention as of late, many such treatments reinstate the hierarchy that Adorno contests, namely, the subordination of the aesthetic value (...)
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  3.  2
    Being In-Between and Becoming Undone: Bardos, Heterotopias, and Nepantla.Jessica Locke - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (2):113.
    This article brings together three concepts from disparate genres: the bardo in Tibetan Buddhism, Michel Foucault’s heterotopia, and Gloria Anzaldúa’s use of nepantla. The literature on bardos, heterotopias, and nepantla depicts moments of groundlessness in intimate, first-personal terms. By “moments of groundlessness,” I mean experiences and events in which the apparent foundations of one’s selfhood and thought vacate. These are uneasy moments of loss, dislocation, and rupture—moments in which we find ourselves decentered in our world, when we are faced with (...)
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  4.  5
    A New Metaphysics: Eternal Recurrence and the Univocity of Difference.Charles Olney - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (2):179.
    Friedrich Nietzsche’s idea of eternal recurrence has confounded generations of thinkers. Karl Jaspers declared it to be the “decisive point” of Nietzsche’s work, while also calling it “philosophically as essential as it is questionable.”1 Bernd Magnus called it “Nietzsche’s Existential Imperative,”2 while Keith Pearson has argued that recurrence “calls the future into being and redeems the past.”3 For Milan Kundera it is a device to communicate the precarious balancing act of life, which sits on the narrowest of strands between the (...)
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  5.  4
    Fichte's Existential Logic.Amie Leigh Zimmer - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (2):201.
    Both Johann Gottlieb Fichte and Jean-Paul Sartre are central and pivotal philosophers of freedom. Yet the influence of Fichte on Sartre seems both to be a matter of fact and surprisingly underdocumented aside from a few impressive exceptions.1 For the early Sartre, consciousness and freedom are synonymous. For Fichte, freedom is a structure borne from self-consciousness itself. Both thinkers develop systems of freedom that they develop from and out of a conception of fundamental self-consciousness. Fichte arrives at the existential subject (...)
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  6.  2
    Actionable Consequences: Reconstruction, Therapy, and the Remainder of Social Science.Lawrence Marcelle & Brendan Hogan - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (1):97-112.
    John Dewey and Ludwig Wittgenstein offer devastating critiques of the dominant model of human action that each inherited in their own time. Dewey, very early in his philosophical career, ostensibly put the stimulus–response mechanical understanding of action to rest with his “reflex-arc” concept article. Wittgenstein famously redescribed action as moves within language games that interconnect to constitute an interpretively open-ended form of life. In each case, these fundamental insights serve as heuristics, guiding our intellectual activity with regard to understanding our (...)
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  7. A Modern Polytheism? Nietzsche and James.Jordan Rodgers - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (1):69-96.
    Polytheism is a strange view to hold in modernity. Connected as it is in the popular imagination with archaic, animistic, magical, prescientific systems of thought, we don’t hesitate much before casting it into the dustbin of history. Even if we are not monotheists, we are likely to think of monotheism as the obviously more plausible position. The traditional arguments for the existence of God, which have been enormously influential in Western philosophy of religion, do not necessarily rule out polytheism but (...)
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  8.  3
    The Body Subject: Being True to the Truths of Experience.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (1):1-29.
    This essay is divided into four sections, the communal aim of which is to provide essential pathways to experiential bodily truths, thereby bringing to light the essential nature of the first-person body, the body subject. The essential pathways are anchored in Husserlian insights concerning the animate nature of the body subject. To arrive at these insights, it is necessary first to clear the field of conceptual obstacles, notably those stemming from idiosyncratic notions of proprioception that fail to accord with the (...)
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  9.  1
    Living Philosophy: Self-Revelation and Damaris Masham's Philosophical Autobiography.Simone Webb - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (1):30-48.
    Damaris Masham’s letters to John Locke can be fruitfully read as a form of philosophical autobiography. By reading them in this way, neglected aspects of Masham’s philosophy of sociability and the self’s relationship to the world can be brought to light. My first section introduces Masham and the letters, suggesting that generic interpretation has been an obstacle to their reception. Second, I argue that they are autobiographical. Third, I argue that they can be considered as philosophical autobiography. To demonstrate this, (...)
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  10.  3
    The Historical and Its Discontents: Nietzsche and Benjamin Against “Historicism”.Yi Wu - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (1):49-68.
    Representations of historicism as the loss of meaning in history and critiques of historicism as the critique of such a loss had been pervasive since late nineteenth century till the Second World War. Among historicism’s most powerful and representative critics were the young Nietzsche and Benjamin in his Parisian exile. This essay seeks to trace from Nietzsche to Benjamin an unbroken yet growing line of critique—of historicism as the “sickness of time” from which modernity suffers, and from which it has (...)
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  11.  2
    Why Do Contradictions Sink to the Ground? A Reexamination of the Categories of Reflection in Hegel's Logic.Nahum Brown - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 33 (4):628-643.
    One of the most interesting debates in Hegel scholarship today comes from the question of how to interpret Hegel’s treatment of contradiction in the Science of Logic.1 Some interpreters claim that Hegel defiantly disregards the basic law of noncontradiction, which states that something cannot both be and not be in the same time, manner, or place, proposing instead that for Hegel true contradictions really do exist, and not only in rational conception but equally in the very fabric of reality. However, (...)
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  12.  5
    Teresa Brennan, William James, and the Energetic Demands of Ethics.Lauren Guilmette - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 33 (4):590-609.
    Teresa Brennan was born in 1952 in Australia and died in South Florida, following a hit-and-run car accident in December 2002. In the ten years between her doctorate and her death, Brennan published five monographs, the most famous posthumously. The Transmission of Affect begins with a question that readers often remember: “Is there anyone who has not, at least once, walked into a room and ‘felt the atmosphere’?” Here and throughout her work, Brennan challenges the self-contained subject of Western modernity, (...)
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  13.  4
    Thinking Through Sound: Martin Heidegger and Wallace Stevens.Joshua Kerr - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 33 (4):553-570.
    In his 1950 lecture entitled “Language,” Martin Heidegger announces a turn in the philosophy of language: for the opening theme, “man speaks,” he substitutes a countervailing theme: “language speaks”. Heidegger saw himself living in an era in which the historical determination of the inquiry into language that began with the Greek conception of human being as the animal with language had developed into a relentlessly technical way of thinking that viewed language instrumentally. By abandoning this conception, displacing the occurrence of (...)
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  14.  5
    Methodologies of Travel: William James and the Ambulatory Pragmatism of Bruno Latour.Bonnie Sheehey - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 33 (4):571-589.
    In a 2006 interview, Bruno Latour, distancing himself from the French philosopher Alain Badiou, casually remarks, “I’m the only French pragmatist, so it winds up that I have absolutely no contact with the French”. Latour’s remark is curious insofar as the work performed by the coupling reveals his own dissociation of French philosophy with pragmatism. If Latour is French, he cannot possibly be a pragmatist, but if he is a pragmatist, he cannot possibly be French, so better to refer to (...)
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  15.  2
    Aristotle's Mathematicals in Metaphysics M.3 and N.6.Andrew Younan - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 33 (4):644-663.
    In his Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, Galileo has Salviati express his admiration for mathematics, in the context of certain historical philosophical schools:That the Pythagoreans held the science of numbers in high esteem, and that Plato himself admired the human understanding and believed it to partake of divinity simply because it understood the nature of numbers, I know very well; nor am I far from being of the same opinion.It is no accident that Aristotle is not among those (...)
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