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  1.  3
    Speculative Cannibalism: Derrida and Viveiros de Castro on Eating-the-Other.Valeria Campos-Salvaterra - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (2):159-185.
    ABSTRACT “Speculative cannibalism” names here some kind of transcendental logic that only works through figuration, in the specific form of an analogical matrix. This article tracks these configurations in the philosophical works of Jacques Derrida and in the anthropological foundations of Eduardo Viveiros de Castro. This article states that as transcendental, this analogical matrix is the condition of possibility of the meaning of alterity and difference—but as analogical works as a transcategorial function that is neither beyond nor before experience, only (...)
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  2.  3
    Relations, Ruptures, and Rituals.Vincent M. Colapietro - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (2):87-106.
    ABSTRACT This article explores relations, ruptures, and rituals in light of repetition. In turn, it considers repetition in light of Freud, Kierkegaard, and Dewey. The author’s engagement with Freud is however partly mediated by attention to how Jonathan Lear, especially in a recent book, Imagining the End: Mourning and Ethical Life (2022), criticizes the Freudian conception of repetition. While Freud valorizes remembrance over repetition, Kierkegaard does just the opposite: he elevates repetition above recollection, at least in the modern age (that (...)
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  3.  3
    Philosophical Foundations of the Critical Theory from the Americas on the Social Philosophies of Bolívar Echeverría and Adolfo Sánchez Vázquez.Stefan Gandler - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (2):186-205.
    ABSTRACT This article wants to expose some central contributions for a critical theory from the Americas, made first of all from the Ecuadorian-Mexican philosopher Bolívar Echeverría and also by the Spanish-Mexican philosopher Adolfo Sánchez Vázquez, bringing them to an imaginary discussion with Alfred Schmidt, Karl Marx, and some concepts of the original critical theory from the now one-hundred-year-old Frankfurt school. The relationship between use value and value, the critique of some Eurocentric “philosophical” ideas inside nonmainstream theories are some of the (...)
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  4.  4
    Rationalism without Representationalism: Deleuze, Whitehead, and the Decolonization of Philosophy, with Lessons from Anthropology’s Ontological Turn.Lisa Landoe Hedrick - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (2):107-139.
    ABSTRACT One way of characterizing the ontological turn in anthropology is the effort to transform philosophical anthropology into anthropological philosophy—or anthropology into philosophy. This effort proceeds upon the premise that to critique philosophical representationalism is to critique the entire rationalist enterprise. It is as a result of this coupling that some OTers suggest that a permanently decolonized philosophy becomes indistinguishable from post-representationalist anthropology. Curiously, it is by thinking with Gilles Deleuze that they conclude, on the one hand, that to decolonize (...)
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  5. Plato’s Parasite: Re:turning with(in) Deleuze.Meike Robaard - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (2):140-158.
    ABSTRACT Upon encountering Deleuze’s Nietzschean reiteration that it is the task of modern philosophy to overturn Platonism, as put forth in Difference and Repetition (1968), this article worms its way in, seeking to unearth not merely what Deleuze’s differential repetition signifies, but also what such gestures generate in (re)turn. By considering Deleuze’s intervention as a manifold performance of (re)purposeful gestures that put the notion of reversal itself into question, and after providing a brief, Deleuzian, exposition of Platonism, this article not (...)
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  6.  35
    Intimacy and Imagination.Alain Beauclair - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):15-30.
    ABSTRACT This article offers an analysis of the concept of intimacy, arguing that it concerns moments of mutual imaginings generative of desire. As a peculiar mode of shared conduct, it is difficult to categorize the value of such actions insofar as they fall outside our ordinary conception of the public and private spheres. Nonetheless, when achieved, intimacy is not only an expansion of the private and a realization of a good-in-itself, but also has a bearing on our orientation to the (...)
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  7.  19
    Relation and Rupture at the End of Life.Megan Craig - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):31-46.
    ABSTRACT This article considers three kinds of relations: being-there-alongside, waiting, and staying, that come into focus at or after the end of life. The first relation is explored in light of Heidegger’s and Levinas’s contrasting accounts of responsibility, the second in terms of Bergson’s notion of hesitation, and the third in relation to Winnicott’s description of a “holding environment.” The work serves as a plea for spaces and practices that support more generous, open-ended, and nuanced relations among those who are (...)
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  8.  7
    Poetry and Well-Patterned Language (in Philosophy).I. I. I. Lee A. McBride - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):1-14.
    Toni Morrison suggests that storytelling is a highly effective way of structuring knowledge, and that the harnessing of a clever allegory, the search for well-patterned language is a constant, provocative engagement with the contemporary world. This article considers the ways poetry, imagination, and well-patterned language are utilized in the philosophies of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Richard Rorty, and Leonard Harris. The author notes that there are apparent similarities between Rorty and Harris, but one should also notice that there are significant differences (...)
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  9.  20
    Beginning AI Phenomenology.Robert S. Leib - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):62-82.
    ABSTRACT This dialogue with GPT-3 took place in November 2022, several weeks before ChatGPT was released to the public. The article’s aim is to find out whether natural language processors can participate in phenomenology at some level by asking about its basic concepts. In the discussion, the dialogue covers questions about phenomenology’s definition and distinction from other subbranches like metaphysics and epistemology. The dialogue discusses the nature of Kermit’s environment and self-conception. The dialogue also establishes some of the basic conditions (...)
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  10.  42
    Poetry and Well-Patterned Language (in Philosophy).Lee A. Mcbride Iii - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):1-14.
    ABSTRACT Toni Morrison suggests that storytelling is a highly effective way of structuring knowledge, and that the harnessing of a clever allegory, the search for well-patterned language is a constant, provocative engagement with the contemporary world. This article considers the ways poetry, imagination, and well-patterned language are utilized in the philosophies of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Richard Rorty, and Leonard Harris. The author notes that there are apparent similarities between Rorty and Harris, but one should also notice that there are significant (...)
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  11.  12
    Earth Art in the Great Acceleration: Times/Counter-Times, Monuments/Counter-Monuments.Gary Shapiro - 2024 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 38 (1):47-61.
    ABSTRACT This article attempts to situate land art in the deserts of the US Southwest in terms of the works’ relation to and rupture with more traditional genres (seventeenth to twentieth centuries) of parks, gardens, and landscape architecture. It argues that the earlier works provide implicit answers to questions concerning Earth’s meaning and offer models of flourishing habitation. In contrast, the more recent works, all constructed in the era of the great acceleration (the Anthropocene), pose questions having to do with (...)
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