Year:

  1. Levinas's Reception of the Mythic.L. Biro Sasha - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):422-431.
    Levinas's project throughout Totality and Infinity and in his earlier works Existence and Existents and Time and the Other is to situate the primacy of the ethical as foundational first philosophy. For Levinas, myth is intimately connected to being, the being before reflection and thought. The entering into reflection and thought Levinas terms transcendence, the epoché, or first ethical gesture. In order to situate his ethics, Levinas turns to the Cartesian notion of infinity: the idea of infinity as an overflowing (...)
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  2.  4
    Initiating Life: Agamben and the Political Use of Intimacy.Erik Bordeleau - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):481-492.
    The form of life is a secret so secret.What does it mean to initiate life? For the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben, the question of initiating life concerns how we conceive of and experiment with the how of a form of life. In short, it involves ways of envisaging an absolutely immanent life on the threshold of its political and ethical intensification. Agamben's whole philosophical project can be described as radical mannerism that foregrounds the question of the way of living. To (...)
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  3.  4
    Habit and Freedom in Merleau-Ponty and Ricœur.Jakub Čapek - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):432-443.
    Philosophical views of habit were deeply influenced by Aristotle. If we understand habit in relation to hexis, to the acquired disposition to act in a certain way, then habit becomes a key phenomenon of ethics. According to the famous quotation, "It makes no small difference, whether we form habits of one kind or of another from our very youth; it makes a very great difference, or rather all the difference."1 And yet we can understand habit also as a dull and (...)
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  4.  6
    Born This Way?: Time and the Coloniality of Gender.Draz Marie - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):372-384.
    The "born this way" narrative remains a popular way to legitimate nonnormative genders and sexualities in the United States. To take just one example, a recent Gallup poll celebrated by the Human Rights Campaign found that the majority of Americans believe that sexuality is something one is born with.1 The hope seems to be that eventually we will see a similar poll about gender identity and we will have taken a giant step forward, reaching the next level of liberation. The (...)
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  5.  6
    The Problem of Forgiveness: Jankélévitch, Deleuze, and Spinoza.Russell Ford - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):409-421.
    The problem of forgiveness may rightly be regarded as a perennial philosophical problem. But of what sort? Introducing his 1973 contribution to the discussion, entitled simply "Forgiveness"—an essay that remains the standard reference for contemporary discussions of the problem, especially in the Anglo-American philosophical community—Aurel Kolnai writes that while the ethical nature of the problem is indisputable, he intends his argument "to be chiefly logical in nature: the central question I wish to discuss is … whether, and if so in (...)
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  6. Programmed to Fail?: On the Limits of Inscription and the Generality of Writing.Deborah Goldgaber - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):444-456.
    Concluding his reading of Saussure in Of Grammatology, Derrida seems to take a breathtaking leap. Asserting the absolute generality of the "written trace," he writes: "Articulating the living upon the nonliving, origin of all repetition, origin of ideality, the trace is not more ideal than real, not more intelligible than sensible, not more a transparent signification than an opaque energy and no concept of metaphysics can describe it."1 Appearing in the context of his reading of Saussure, the trace seemed to (...)
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  7.  7
    Ta-Nehisi Coates's Phenomenology of the Body.James B. Haile Iii - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):493-503.
    The publication of Ta-Nehisi Coates's "letter to his son," Between the World and Me,1 has been met with mixed and widespread reviews and reactions. Responses have ranged from a critique of his "pessimism" to a grand celebratory remark announcing him as the next great intellectual and social critic in the mold of James Baldwin.2 Yet there are few reviews that have acknowledged Coates's project as a materialist cosmology of the body. What does this mean? In short, it means that while (...)
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  8.  3
    Hospitality's Downfall: Kant, Cosmopolitanism, and Refugees.Adam Knowles - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):347-357.
    Neoliberal rationality eliminates what these thinkers termed the "good life" or the "true realm of freedom", by which they did not mean luxury, leisure, or indulgence, but rather the cultivation and expression of distinctly human capacities for ethical and political freedom, creativity, unbounded reflection, or invention.The legacy of Kant's political writings is uniquely duplicitous. This is because the space of the Kantian text is capable—as great philosophical works often are—of sustaining immense contradictions.1 On the one hand, as has long been (...)
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  9.  2
    Homo Sacer, Homo Magus, and the Ethics of Philosophical Archaeology.Robert S. Leib - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):358-371.
    In The Order of Things, Michel Foucault describes the task of the philosophical archaeologist: to study the incommensurable breaks and disruptions in a given history of systems of thought. Akin to the distinctive layers of soil one finds digging into the earth, Foucault analyzes what he calls an episteme: a distinctive cultural and intellectual order that shapes the character and limits of knowledge production and the parameters of experience as such.1 Where archaeology sees radical breaks between epistemes, Foucault's later genealogical (...)
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  10. Life and Sexual Difference in Hegel and Beauvoir.Shannon M. Mussett - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):396-408.
    Much maligned for deeply problematic language describing female physiology and its peculiar use of "data," Simone de Beauvoir's chapter on biology from The Second Sex appears to be an unusual entry point into the question of woman as Other. In "Biological Data," Beauvoir traces a relationship between the female animal and the species that becomes more alarming as she moves from unicellular organisms to complex mammalian life. By the time she reaches human beings, we are bombarded with passages emphasizing woman's (...)
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  11. Decolonial Woes and Practices of Un-Knowing.Mariana Ortega - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):504-516.
    It matters that we learn to walk our brave decolonizing talks. … Coalitions that are productive are based on principled associations of mutual understanding and respect, not just declarations of solidarity that mean well but because of privileges of class, "race" or ethnicity, gender, and sexuality do not engage the work of transforming such subjectivity.Silences, when heard, become the negotiating spaces for the decolonizing subject.In this article I reflect about "decolonial woes"—not the misfortunes and distress that are associated with expressions (...)
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  12.  1
    SPEP Co-Director's Address: The Basho of Transcontinental Philosophy.Brian Schroeder - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):319-334.
    The general topic of my remarks concerns the place, or basho in Japanese, of transcontinental philosophy within the context of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy and the philosophical profession in general. I introduced the term transcontinental when as director of the thirty-fifth Collegium Phaenomenologicum in 2010 I formulated the theme of that year's meeting: "Transcontinental Philosophy: Interpreting Philosophy Across Borders and Idioms." Marking what was a historic first for the Collegium Phaenomenologicum—namely, engaging non–North American and European perspectives on (...)
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  13. Introduction.Brian Schroeder & Alia Al-Saji - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):313-318.
    This special issue brings together some of the highlights from the fifty-fifth annual meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy. Utah Valley University hosted the conference on October 20–22, 2016, in Salt Lake City, Utah. The title of this issue, "Placing Transcontinental Philosophy," attempts to capture a sense of the expanding diversity and depth of continental philosophy in the new millennium as it is practiced and advanced by SPEP. The neologism transcontinental philosophy signifies not only the growing global (...)
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  14.  2
    The Existential and Semantic Truth of Religion in Jürgen Habermas's Political Philosophy and the Possibility of a Philosophy of Religion.Michael Schulz - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):457-467.
    The former president of the German Constitutional Court, Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde, coined the formulation, "The liberal, secularised state is nourished by presuppositions that it cannot itself guarantee."1 In the first part of this article I would like to discuss the deliberations of one who is considered the chief philosopher of the Federal Republic of Germany, Jürgen Habermas, in particular his thinking regarding the epistemological and existential status and role of religion in a modern democracy. I investigate Habermas's concept of philosophy with (...)
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  15.  1
    Celebrating Bimal Krishna Matilal: A Give and Take.Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):335-346.
    I have always admired the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy for its public commitment to intellectual equality. I will gloss it as a headnote for this article by way of some words from Mary Rawlinson's new book, Just Life: "Critical phenomenology starts from the idea that universality appears in multiplicity and difference. More than one narrative will be necessary to do justice to life. Women's experience is just as much an opportunity for the appearance of the universal as is (...)
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  16.  1
    Critical Theory in the Age of Knowledge Capitalism: Elusive Exploitation, Affects, and New Political Economies.Yannik Thiem - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):468-480.
    In recent years, after decades of largely avoiding engagements with political economy, discussions of the new forms of capitalism, neoliberalism, and the information society have become central again to critical theory. Following this recognition of the importance of political economy, this article aims at honing our conceptual tools to examine the political and social economies of contemporary capitalism, which I understand with Yann Moulier Boutang as "cognitive capitalism."1 I am particularly interested in how changing economic and social practices inflect our (...)
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  17.  2
    The Caprice of Being: Αἰών and Φύσις in Merleau-Ponty, Heraclitus, and Deleuze.Keith Whitmoyer - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):385-395.
    As he was drafting the manuscript for his unfinished work The Visible and the Invisible, Merleau-Ponty was concerned with the modern crisis of rationality expressed in our relationship to nature, a crisis that requires a revision and radicalization of our ontology, a radicalization that, as he says, entails the "rediscovery of φύσις, then of λόγος."1 In light of the incompleteness of this project, there has been some fruitful discussion of Merleau-Ponty's philosophy of nature at the end of his career and (...)
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  18.  3
    A Tale of Two Social Philosophies. Frega - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):260.
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  19.  5
    A Tale of Two Social Philosophies.Roberto Frega - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):260-272.
    The resurgence of pragmatism in political philosophy that has taken place in the last thirty years has been dominated by two main theoretical moves, the first consisting in reclaiming it as part of the liberal tradition, the second consisting in inscribing it within the broad camp of critical theories. Prominent in this second perspective have been the contributions of several representatives of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory. As is known, Jürgen Habermas’s theory of deliberative democracy depends heavily on John (...)
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  20.  2
    The Critical Nature of Gender: A Deweyan Approach to the Sex/Gender Distinction. Gregoratto - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):273.
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  21.  6
    The Critical Nature of Gender: A Deweyan Approach to the Sex/Gender Distinction.Gregoratto Federica - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):273-285.
    One of the most controversial questions in feminist philosophy, and maybe the most controversial of all, concerns our determination as sexual or gendered human beings: Is it nature or is it our culture, or society, that makes us what we are—women, men, other? And if it is both, to what extent and in which sense is it nature, and to what extent and in which sense is it social life? Whatever the answer may be, one widespread and allegedly useful modality (...)
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  22.  1
    Dewey's Progressive Historicism and the Problem of Determinate Oughts. Laitinen - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):245.
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  23.  5
    Dewey's Progressive Historicism and the Problem of Determinate Oughts.Arto Laitinen - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):245-259.
    This article has three sections. The first makes introductory notes invoking Dewey’s views of human agency stressing the notions of habits and practices. The second section suggests that Dewey’s general view on ethics, normativity, and the grounds of social criticism belongs to a “progressive historicist” camp, which tries to avoid appeals to universal Archimedean standpoints and avoid a collapse into unconstrained relativism.1 That section will introduce the notion of an “evaluative framework,” which can be embodied both implicitly in practice and (...)
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  24. Dewey's Critical Conception of Work. Renault - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):286.
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  25.  1
    Dewey's Critical Conception of Work.Emmanuel Renault - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):286-298.
    Contemporary scholarship generally underestimates the importance of the reference to work in Dewey’s social and political philosophy. This underestimation results mainly from two reasons. The first relates to a general marginalization of work issues in contemporary social and political philosophy. The second reason is that neopragmatist readings of Dewey usually depict his political philosophy as a deliberative theory of democracy, or as a democratic experimentalism, in which the work issue has no specific role to play, being one of many in (...)
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  26.  1
    Immanent Critique as Self-Transformative Practice: Hegel, Dewey, and Contemporary Critical Theory. Särkelä - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):218.
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  27.  2
    Immanent Critique as Self-Transformative Practice: Hegel, Dewey, and Contemporary Critical Theory.Arvi Särkelä - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):218-230.
    Every model of critique establishes a double bind to critical practice. On the one hand, it has to entail a normative conception of how to proceed in critical practice such that the practice counts as truly critical: the model gives authoritative directions for critical practice, and it evaluates specific practices as more or less critical. As the model is one of immanent critique, it does this by accounting for how the standard the critical procedure employs inheres in the object, social (...)
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  28. John Dewey and Social Criticism: An Introduction.Arvi Särkelä & Justo Serrano Zamora - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):213-217.
    Critical social theories are generally understood to be distinct from other normative theories by their explicit orientation toward emancipation: they not only present normative criteria for assessing the legitimacy or justification of social institutions or merely inquire into the actualized freedom of a given form of social life but claim to point toward a “freedom in view”—an end that might aid those participating in social struggles to overcome the pathological, alienated, or ideological social order of the present. John Dewey’s social (...)
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  29. John Dewey and Social Criticism: An Introduction. Särkelä & Zamora Serrano - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):213.
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  30.  1
    The Authority of Life: The Critical Task of Dewey's Social Ontology. Testa - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):231.
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  31.  9
    The Authority of Life: The Critical Task of Dewey's Social Ontology.Italo Testa - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):231-244.
    A peculiar socio-ontological approach is to be found in Dewey’s writings of the twenties—mainly in Human Nature and Conduct, Experience and Nature, and The Public and Its Problems. According to Dewey, it is proper of social and political facts to be dependent on human activity and still exhibit an “objective reality.” Such facts exist out there, have causal consequences, and have objectively knowable properties : they are, to use John Searle’s phrase, “epistemologically objective”.1 When it comes to understanding how social (...)
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  32.  3
    Overcoming Hermeneutical Injustice: Cultural Self-Appropriation and the Epistemic Practices of the Oppressed.Zamora Serrano - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):299.
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  33.  5
    Overcoming Hermeneutical Injustice: Cultural Self-Appropriation and the Epistemic Practices of the Oppressed.Justo Serrano Zamora - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (2):299-310.
    In the last three decades, ongoing debates on the epistemic features of democratic decision making have influenced the way we conceive the basic terms of democratic theory, such as inclusion, participation, public reason, and collective autonomy.1 Within these debates, attention has been given to the role played by mobilized collectives in the generation of the knowledge necessary for the enhancement of the epistemic quality of those processes. However, little attention has been given to a further epistemic function of mobilizations: the (...)
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  34.  4
    The Primordial Forms of Autopoiesis: It Is Self-Assemblage All the Way Down.Vincent Colapietro - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):190-206.
    Nature makes every creature do its own work and get its living [or being]. … The planet makes itself. The animal cell makes itself. … As soon as there is life, there is self-direction and absorbing and using of material. Life is freedom,—life in the direct ratio of its amount.In “A Sketch of the Past,” Virginia Woolf suggests: “Behind the cotton wool [of everyday life] is hidden a pattern.” She insists “that we—I mean all human beings—are connected with this; that (...)
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  35.  1
    America as Assemblage of Placeways: Toward a Meshwork of Lifelines.Robert E. Innis - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):40-62.
    John Brinckerhoff Jackson in his A Sense of Place, a Sense of Time writes, “Much of our contemporary American landscape can no longer be seen as a composition of well-defined individual spaces—farms, counties, states, territories, and ecological regions—but as zones of influence and control of roads, streets, highways: arteries which dominate and nourish and hold a landscape together and provide it with instant accessibility.”1 Jackson’s notion of zones has important experiential and semiotic consequences for the structures of experiencing. A zone (...)
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  36. The May Day Machine: Assemblages in Nineteenth-Century Chicago.Richard A. Lee - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):63-81.
    The conceptual ambiance, the assemblage of ideas, of A Thousand Plateaus enables a rich kind of tracing of the logic or set of logics related to desires and forces while it makes difficult, if not impossible, a certain form of understanding.2 The topic of “American assemblages” seemed as though it might be a useful figure under which to think through the coming together of labor and its dissolution at the end of the nineteenth century in Chicago. As I will argue (...)
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  37.  4
    Turning Listening Inside Out: Brian Eno's Ambient 1: Music for Airports.John Lysaker - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):155-176.
    The courage is in letting go of something old that has been successful and has its own momentum.“As an assemblage, a book has only itself,” say Deleuze and Guattari. It exists “in connection with other assemblages and in relation to other bodies without organs. We will never ask what a book means, as signified or signifier; we will not look for anything to understand in it. We will ask what it functions with, in connection with what other things it does (...)
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  38. He Saw What Was Going to Happen in the World and Put It on Stage.Mary Magada-Ward - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):177-189.
    I take as my title a claim made by Arthur Mitchell about George Balanchine’s 1957 ballet Agon. Mitchell, a MacArthur Fellow, U.S. Medal of Arts winner, and founder of the Dance Theatre of Harlem,1 was the first African American principal dancer in the history of the New York City Ballet. Most importantly for my purposes, he was also the premier danseur upon whom Balanchine choreographed the central pas de deux of Agon. Mitchell’s partner was the ballerina Diana Adams, whom Balanchine (...)
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  39.  6
    The U.S. Border and the Political Ontology of "Assassination Nation": Thanatological Dispositifs.Mendieta Eduardo - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):82-100.
    The U.S.-Mexican border es una herida abierta where the Third World grates against the first and bleeds. And before a scab forms it hemorrhages again, the lifeblood of two worlds merging to form a third country—a border culture. Borders are set up to define the places that are safe and unsafe, to distinguish us from them. A border is a dividing line, a narrow strip along a steep edge. A borderland is a vague and undetermined place created by the emotional (...)
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  40.  3
    Religion and the "Religious": Cormac McCarthy and John Dewey.Robert Metcalf - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):135-154.
    Once there were brook trout in the streams in the mountains. You could see them standing in the amber current where the white edges of their fins wimpled softly in the flow. They smelled of moss in your hand. Polished and muscular and torsional. On their backs were vermiculate patterns that were maps of the world in its becoming. Maps and mazes. Of a thing which could not be put back. Not be made right again. In the deep glens where (...)
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  41.  3
    Nepantla: Writing the In-Between.Charles Scott & Nancy Tuana - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):1-15.
    And I now call it Nepantla, which is a Nahuatl word for the space between two bodies of water, the space between two worlds. It is a limited space, a space where you are not this or that but where you are changing. You haven’t got into the new identity yet and haven’t left the old identity behind either—you are in a kind of transition. And that is what Nepantla stands for. It is very awkward, uncomfortable and frustrating to be (...)
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  42.  1
    The Idea of America.Jessica Wahman - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):16-39.
    An angel is just a belief, with wings […]Melting pot, multicultural mosaic, and welcoming recipient of the world’s tired, poor, huddled masses. Land of opportunity. Shining city on a hill, land of the free, and home of the brave. These are just some of the images of America that are supposed to represent its virtues or at least its aspirations.1 When treated as preordained truisms about what America is or means, these concepts can produce dogmatic, rigid, and reactionary attitudes toward (...)
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  43.  98
    The Job of Creating Desire: Propaganda as an Apparatus of Government and Subjectification.Cory Wimberly - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):101-118.
    Abstract: This article addresses shortcomings in the way that philosophers and cultural critics have considered propaganda by offering a new genealogical account. Looking at figures such as Marx, Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas, Bourdieu, and Stanley, this article finds that their consideration of propaganda has not necessarily been wrong but has missed some of the most significant and important functions of propaganda. This text draws on archival and published materials from propagandists, most notably Edward Bernays, to elaborate a new governmentality of propaganda (...)
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  44.  2
    Between Two Betweens: Hannah Arendt and the Politics of Education.Emily Zakin - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (1):119-134.
    It seems to me that conservatism, in the sense of conservation, is of the essence of the educational activity, whose task is always to cherish and protect something—the child against the world, the world against the child, the new against the old, the old against the new.Exactly for the sake of what is new and revolutionary in every child, education must be conservative; it must preserve this newness and introduce it as a new thing into an old world, which, however (...)
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