Ratio Juris 24 (1):49-58 (2011)

Authors
Eva Kittay
State University of New York, Stony Brook
Abstract
According to the most important theories of justice, personal dignity is closely related to independence, and the care that people with disabilities receive is seen as a way for them to achieve the greatest possible autonomy. However, human beings are naturally subject to periods of dependency, and people without disabilities are only “temporarily abled.” Instead of seeing assistance as a limitation, we consider it to be a resource at the basis of a vision of society that is able to account for inevitable dependency relationships between “unequals” ensuring a fulfilling life both for the carer and the cared for.**
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DOI 10.1111/j.1467-9337.2010.00473.x
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Morals From Motives.Michael Slote - 2001 - Oxford University Press.

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