'Trouble from within': Allergy, autoimmunity, and pathology in the first half of the twentieth century

Abstract
Traditionally, autoimmune disease has been considered to be a case of false recognition; the immune system mistakenly identifies 'self' tissues as foreign, attacking them thus causing damage and malady. Accordingly, the history of autoimmunity is usually told as part ot the history of immunology, that is, of theories and experiments relating to the ability of the immune system to discriminate between self and nonself. This paper challenges this view, claiming that the emergence of the notion of autoimmunity in the 1950s must be considered as part of a long develolpment in thought about pathology throughout the twentieth century, namely the conceptualisaiton of disease as a reactive and self-destructive process. During the first part of the twentieth century this notion became one of the cornerstones of pathology and was increasingly employed for the explanation of the non-infections, slow-burning diseases. Thus, the category of chronic disease had been defined anew, now encompassing all those diseases characterised by a persistent inflammatory process. Inflammation, in turn, was conceived as double-eged physiological mechanism, which was usually the direct mediator of damage, of the essence of disease. The paper also shows how this kind of analysis could emable a unified historical discussion of autoimmunity and allergy, hitherto considered to have distinct conceptual origins.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1016/S1369-8486(03)00052-9
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history
Request removal from index
Download options
Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 28,208
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA
Immunity and its Other: The Anaphylactic Selves of Charles Richet.K. Kroker - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (3):273-296.
The Causes of Infectious Disease.Ferdinand Hueppe - 1898 - The Monist 8 (3):384-414.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA
Biotherapies of Chronic Diseases in the Inter-War Period: From Witte's Peptone to Penicillium Extract.Ilana Löwy - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (4):675-695.
Imagining 'Reactivity': Allergy Within the History of Immunology.Michelle Jamieson - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):356-366.
Imagining ‘Reactivity’: Allergy Within the History of Immunology.Michelle Jamieson - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (4):356-366.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles
Johnny Wilkinson's Addiction.Malcolm Horne - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):31-34.
Natural History and the Clinic: The Regional Ecology of Allergy in America.G. Mitman - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (3):491-510.
Terrorism and Trauma: Negotiating Derridean 'Autoimmunity'.M. la Caze - 2011 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (5):605-619.
A Pathological View of Disease.William E. Stempsey - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (4):321-330.
John Freeman, Hay Fever and the Origins of Clinical Allergy in Britain, 1900-1950.M. Jackson - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (3):473-490.

Monthly downloads

Added to index

2009-01-28

Total downloads

21 ( #238,244 of 2,172,866 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

1 ( #324,901 of 2,172,866 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.

Other forums