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  1. added 2020-06-30
    A Concerning Display of Medical Indifference: Reply to ‘Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and an Illness-Focused Approach to Care: Controversy, Morality and Paradox’.Diane O'Leary - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011743.
    In ‘Chronic fatigue syndrome and an illness-focused approach to care: controversy, morality and paradox’, authors Michael Sharpe and Monica Greco begin by characterising myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome as illness-without-disease. On that basis they ask why patients reject treatments for illness-without-disease, and they answer with a philosophical idea. Whitehead’s ‘bifurcation of nature’, they suggest, still dominates public and professional thinking, and that conceptual confusion leads patients to reject the treatment they need. A great deal has occurred, however, since Whitehead characterised his (...)
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  2. added 2020-06-23
    Historical relations between Internal Medicine and Pathological Anatomy.Junior Vega Jiménez, Yailin Cabrera Hernández, Dalia García Cuervo, Leydiana Trimiño Galindo & Daylin González González - 2017 - Humanidades Médicas 17 (1):237-248.
    La relación de discrepancia y coincidencia de las causas de muerte entre el diagnóstico clínico y anatomopatológico constituye de forma indirecta un indicador de calidad de la atención médica. Son múltiples los ejemplos de enfermedades descubiertas o esclarecidas gracias a la autopsia, que tiene en la correlación clinicopatológica un basamento fundamental. Se estableció como objetivo de investigación describir los principales vínculos históricos entre las especialidades de medicina interna y anatomía patológica, que tienen como enlace esencial la correlación clínico patológica, atendiendo (...)
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  3. added 2020-06-18
    The Obesity Epidemic: Medical and Ethical Considerations. [REVIEW]Jantina de Vries - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):55-67.
    Obesity is increasingly becoming a problem for Western societies, to the extent that politicians, scientists, patient organisations and the media now refer to it as ‘the obesity epidemic’. Concerns about the damaging effect of increasing body weight on public health has led to a strong growth in the amount of scientific work on the condition, with the medical professions leading the way. This article discusses that, first of all, scientific evidence for obesity-associated mortality is at best ambiguous, and proposes that (...)
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  4. added 2020-06-15
    The Nature of Hysteria.Niel Micklem - 1995 - Routledge.
    Hysteria was a frequently diagnosed illness in the West through the nineteenth and much of the twentieth century. Today the medical profession has virtually abandoned the diagnosis altogether. However, this does not mean that hysteria has ceased to exist. In _The Nature of Hysteria_, Niel Micklem argues that the disease has merely shifted into other personal and collective forms. He traces the history of hysteria from ancient Egyptian times to the present and examines its mythic background. He also describes the (...)
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  5. added 2020-06-15
    The Nature of Hysteria.Niel Micklem - 1995 - Routledge.
    Hysteria was a frequently diagnosed illness in the West through the nineteenth and much of the twentieth century. Today the medical profession has virtually abandoned the diagnosis altogether. However, this does not mean that hysteria has ceased to exist. In _The Nature of Hysteria_, Niel Micklem argues that the disease has merely shifted into other personal and collective forms. He traces the history of hysteria from ancient Egyptian times to the present and examines its mythic background. He also describes the (...)
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  6. added 2020-06-12
    Poison and Disease in Anglo-Saxon Medicine and Metaphor.Claire Whitenack - 2019 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    Poison and Disease in Anglo-Saxon Medicine and Metaphor bridges a gap between scholarship on medieval medicine and literary analysis of Anglo-Saxon literature by examining the relationship between beliefs about disease causation in medical recipe-books and the use of extended metaphors of illness in Old English poetry and other non-medical works. Chapter 1 takes a novel approach to identifying beliefs about the causes of disease by analyzing preventive prescriptions in the Old English Herbarium and Medicina de Quadrupedibus, two recipe-books that have (...)
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  7. added 2020-06-08
    The Concept of ‘Illness Without Disease’ Impedes Understanding of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Response to Sharpe and Greco.Steven Lubet & David Tuller - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011807.
    In a recent article in Medical Humanities, Sharpe and Greco characterise myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome as an ‘illness without disease’, citing the absence of identified diagnostic markers. They attribute patients’ rejection of psychological and behavioural interventions, such as cognitive–behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy, to a ‘paradox’ resulting from a supposed failure to acknowledge that ‘there is no good objective evidence of bodily disease’. In response, we explain that understandings about the causes of and treatments for medical complaints have shifted (...)
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  8. added 2020-06-08
    Rethinking the History of Peptic Ulcer Disease: From Digital Textual Analysis to Declining Research Programs.Bartosz Radomski, Dunja Šešelja & Naumann Kim - unknown
    The history of the research on peptic ulcer disease is characterized by a premature abandonment of the bacterial hypothesis, which subsequently had its comeback, leading to the discovery of Helicobacter pylori -- the major cause of the disease. In this paper we examine the received view on this case, according to which the primary reason for the abandonment of the bacterial hypothesis of PUD in the mid-twentieth century was a large-scale study by a prominent gastroenterologist Palmer, which suggested no bacteria (...)
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  9. added 2020-06-08
    Moral Descriptors and the Assessment of Children.Joan F. Goodman - 1998 - Journal of Moral Education 27 (4):475-487.
    Abstract In the world outside schools, the public clamours for more character education; inside schools, psychologists, responsible for evaluating children, neither assess the moral domain nor use moral terminology to describe children. There are powerful reasons to resist the reintroduction of moral language into psychological assessments: such inclusion could promote invidious labelling, burden children with shame and guilt and open the diagnostic system to increased subjectivity, capriciousness and stigmatization??the substitution of ?illness? for what is mere social and cultural difference. Despite (...)
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  10. added 2020-06-08
    Medical and Neuropsychiatric Aspects of Lycanthropy.Miles E. Drake - 1992 - Journal of Medical Humanities 13 (1):5-15.
    The metamorphosis of human beings into wolves is well known in mythology, legend, and scripture, and has been extensively surveyed in history, theology, and literature. Werewolf cases have attracted the attention of both ancient and modern physicians, particularly during the development of modern psychiatry and behavioral neurology. Some writers have suggested that lycanthropes suffered from schizophrenia or had intentionally or involuntarily ingested hallucinogens. Hysteria and affective disorder, either mania or intense depression, could also be invoked as causes. Lycanthropy has often (...)
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  11. added 2020-06-08
    Modern Medicine's Shortcomings: Can We Really Conquer Disease?David P. Goldblatt - 1977 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 20 (3):450-456.
  12. added 2020-06-08
    The Conquest of Scurvy.C. C. Lloyd - 1963 - British Journal for the History of Science 1 (4):357-363.
    Scurvy is now almost a forgotten disease, but it would be difficult to exaggerate its importance in the history of a maritime nation such as our own. To the historian of medical science it is equally interesting, because the various and extraordinary variety of theories concerning it reflect in themselves the intellectual climate of the past. By their repeated refusal to accept the conclusions of an experimental method, by their pedantic reliance on a priori reasoning or antiquated prejudices, the medical (...)
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  13. added 2020-05-26
    Disease: The Phenomenological and Conceptual Center of Practical-Clinical Medicine.Per Sundström - 2001 - In Kay Toombs (ed.), Handbook of Phenomenology and Medicine. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 109--126.
  14. added 2020-05-21
    We Need to Talk About Epizelus: ‘PTSD’ and the Ancient World.Owen Rees - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):46-54.
    In the pursuit to offer validity and lineage to the modern diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder, non-historical scholars often remove ancient episodes from their social context and retrospectively diagnose them based on our modern diagnostic criteria. This approach reinforces our pre-existing ideas, and form a confirmation bias that does not help to grow our understanding of these injuries. As this article argues, the use of ancient precedents would offer greater benefit to the psychological and medical profession when used to ask (...)
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  15. added 2020-05-20
    The Product Guides the Process: Discovering Disease Mechanisms.Lindley Darden, Lipika R. Pal, Kunal Kundu & John Moult - 2018 - In David Danks & Emiliano Ippoliti (eds.), Building Theories: Heuristics and Hypotheses in Sciences. Springer International Publishing.
    The nature of the product to be discovered guides the reasoning to discover it. Biologists and medical researchers often search for mechanisms. The "new mechanistic philosophy of science" provides resources about the nature of biological mechanisms that aid the discovery of mechanisms. Here, we apply these resources to the discovery of mechanisms in medicine. A new diagrammatic representation of a disease mechanism chain indicates both what is known and, most significantly, what is not known at a given time, thereby guiding (...)
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  16. added 2020-05-20
    Ontologies for the Study of Neurological Disease.Alexander P. Cox, Mark Jensen, William Duncan, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Kinga Szigeti, Alan Ruttenberg, Barry Smith & Alexander D. Diehl - 2012 - In Towards an Ontology of Mental Functioning (ICBO Workshop), Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology. Graz:
    We have begun work on two separate but related ontologies for the study of neurological diseases. The first, the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND), is intended to provide a set of controlled, logically connected classes to describe the range of neurological diseases and their associated signs and symptoms, assessments, diagnoses, and interventions that are encountered in the course of clinical practice. ND is built as an extension of the Ontology for General Medical Sciences — a high-level candidate OBO Foundry ontology that (...)
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  17. added 2020-05-20
    An Examination of the Aesthetic Qualities of Medical Science : Simplicity, Elegance and the One Gene-One Disease Assumption.Michael John Taylor - unknown
    This thesis is an examination of how the ideal of scientific unity and consilience, paradigms in which all knowledge is interconnected and relatable, manifests itself within the field of genetics. The primarily philosophical tool by which such unity is achieved is reductionism, and this research explores a very particular form of reductionism applied to genetics: the one gene – one disease assumption. The OGOD assumption links complex human diseases and behaviours to their perceived ultimate, knowable cause – a gene. While (...)
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  18. added 2020-05-20
    Natural History Of Parasitic Disease: Patrick Manson's Philosophical Method.Shang-Jen Li - 2002 - Isis 93 (2):206-228.
    A distinct British approach to disease in the tropics has been identified in the recent historiography of colonial medicine: Mansonian tropical medicine, named after Sir Patrick Manson , the founder of the London School of Tropical Medicine. This essay examines Manson's study of filariasis and argues that his conceptual tools and research framework were derived from contemporary natural history. It investigates Manson's training in natural history at the University of Aberdeen, where some of his teachers were closely associated with transcendental (...)
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  19. added 2020-05-18
    Screening for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders by Nonmedical Community Workers.M. J. O'Connor, M. J. A. Rotheram-Borus, M. Tomlinson, C. Bill, I. M. LeRoux & J. Stewart - unknown
    BACKGROUND: South Africa has the highest prevalence of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in the world yet many women have no access to clinic care or to physicians in their communities. The shortage of physicians trained in the diagnosis of FASD is even more severe. Thus there is a need to train community workers to assist in the delivery of health care.OBJECTIVES: This study reports on the effectiveness of training community workers to screen for a possible diagnosis of a FASD.METHODS: Community (...)
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  20. added 2020-05-18
    Systematic Validation of Disease Models for Pharmacoeconomic Evaluations.Peter P. Sendi, Bruce A. Craig, Dominik Pfluger, Amiram Gafni & Heiner C. Bucher - 1999 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 5 (3):283-295.
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  21. added 2020-05-15
    Why Have Non-Communicable Diseases Been Left Behind?Florencia Luna & Valerie A. Luyckx - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (1):5-25.
    Non-communicable diseases are no longer largely limited to high-income countries and the elderly. The burden of non-communicable diseases is rising across all country income categories, in part because these diseases have been relatively overlooked on the global health agenda. Historically, communicable diseases have been prioritized in many countries as they were perceived to constitute the greatest disease burden, especially among vulnerable and poor populations, and strategies for prevention and treatment, which had been successful in high-income settings, were considered feasible and (...)
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  22. added 2020-05-15
    Frailty and Fragility: Framing a Diagnostic Category.Ruth Groenhaut - 2019 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 12 (2):1-17.
    Frailty has recently become a diagnostic category for older adults in the United States. Although one may have spoken colloquially of an individual as frail in years past, it was not considered a medical condition with a specific and quantifiable definition. Currently, the generally cited medical definition of frailty is “a biologic syndrome of decreased reserve and resistance to stressors, resulting from cumulative decline across multiple physiologic systems, and causing vulnerability to adverse outcomes”. The core elements of frailty are: “weakness, (...)
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  23. added 2020-05-15
    Defining Metabolic Syndrome: Which Kind of Causality, If Any, is Required?Margherita Benzi - 2017 - Disputatio 9 (47):553-580.
    The definition of metabolic syndrome has been, and still is, extremely controversial. My purpose is not to give a solution to the associated debate but to argue that the controversy is at least partially due to the different ‘causal content’ of the various definitions: their theoretical validity and practical utility can be evaluated by reconstructing or making explicit the underlying causal structure. I will therefore propose to distinguish the alternative definitions according to the kinds of causal content they carry: definitions (...)
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  24. added 2020-05-15
    A Concise History of Asperger Syndrome: The Short Reign of a Troublesome Diagnosis.J. B. Barahona-Corrêa & Carlos N. Filipe - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  25. added 2020-05-15
    A Public Health Ethics Approach to Non-Communicable Diseases.Stacy M. Carter & Lucie Rychetnik - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):17-18.
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  26. added 2020-05-15
    The Biomedical Standardization of Premenstrual Syndrome.Loes Knaapen & George Weisz - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (1):120-134.
    This essay traces the history of premenstrual syndrome in French, British, and American medical literature from 1950 to 2004. Aetiological theories, treatments and diagnostic criteria have varied over time and place, reflecting local conditions and changing notions of objectivity and evidence. During the 1970s researchers in each nation utilised different research strategies to overcome variation and contradictory results characteristic of PMS research. Since the 1980s, attempts have been made to standardise research internationally through prospective daily rating questionnaires that diagnose and (...)
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  27. added 2020-05-15
    Mothers on Trial: Discourses of Cot Death and Munchausen’s Syndrome by Proxy. [REVIEW]Fiona E. Raitt & M. Suzanne Zeedyk - 2004 - Feminist Legal Studies 12 (3):257-278.
    This article explores some of the issues raised by Munchausen’s Syndrome by Proxy (MSbP) and the relationship between medicine and law, specifically the discourses which feature in the courtroom portraying motherhood and expectations of parenting. These discourses are often hidden yet play a determining role in prosecutions for alleged maltreatment of children involving medically unexplained infant death syndrome. We offer a critique of MSbP and seek to unveil the assumptions about mothers, the parent predominantly affected by the ‘diagnosis’, and mothering (...)
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  28. added 2020-05-15
    The Idea of a Germ - Spreading Germs: Disease Theories and Medical Practice in Britain, 1865-1900 Michael Worboys, Cambridge Studies in the History of Medicine, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000, Pp. XVI+327, Price £45 Hardback, ISBN 0-521-77302-. [REVIEW]C. D. - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (2):367-373.
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  29. added 2020-05-15
    The Idea of a Germ: Spreading Germs: Disease Theories and Medical Practice in Britain, 1865–1900 Michael Worboys, Cambridge Studies in the History of Medicine, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000, Pp. Xvi+ 327, Price£ 45 Hardback, ISBN 0-521-77302-4. [REVIEW]Deborah C. Brunton - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (2):367-373.
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  30. added 2020-05-15
    The Epidemiology of “Regrettable Kinship”: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain. [REVIEW]Lisa Lynch - 2002 - Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (3-4):203-219.
    In “The Epidemiology of ‘Regrettable Kinship’: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain,” the author analyzes two contemporary cultural texts about women and environmentally-linked illnesses to rethink commonplace understandings of the relationship between gender, disease, and community formation. By reading these narratives side by side, Lynch is able to address difficult issues about gendered subjectivity and the fragile construction of collective political identity. While the female protagonists in the texts Lynch examines relate differently to their (...)
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  31. added 2020-05-15
    Michael Worboys. Spreading Germs: Disease Theories and Medical Practice in Britain, 1865–1900. Xvi + 327 Pp., Illus., Tables, Bibl., Index.Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000. $59.95. [REVIEW]William H. Brock - 2002 - Isis 93 (1):140-141.
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  32. added 2020-05-15
    On Values, Professionalism and Nosology: An Essay with Late Commentary on Essays by DeVito and Rudnick.Edmund L. Erde - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (5):581 – 603.
    The essays by Scott DeVito and Abraham Rudnick are on largely the same topics - the meanings of health(y), normal, disease, pathological, diagnosis , etc., and they contain compatible conclusions - that medical precepts are value-laden and less objective than some na?ve model of scientific objectivity would suggest. This commentary opens with a brief critique of each and ends with a more in-depth account, one complaint being how lacking in weight the analyses are. In the middle portion of this commentary, (...)
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  33. added 2020-05-15
    Explaining Disease: Correlations, Causes, and Mechanisms. [REVIEW]Paul Thagard - 1998 - Minds and Machines 8 (1):61-78.
    Why do people get sick? I argue that a disease explanation is best thought of as causal network instantiation, where a causal network describes the interrelations among multiple factors, and instantiation consists of observational or hypothetical assignment of factors to the patient whose disease is being explained. This paper first discusses inference from correlation to causation, integrating recent psychological discussions of causal reasoning with epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation, particularly concerning ulcers and lung cancer. It then shows how causal (...)
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  34. added 2020-05-15
    Maternal Education and Family Income as Determinants of Severe Disease Following Acute Diarrhoea in Children: A Case Control Study.Dilip Mahalanabis, Abu S. G. Faruque, Asma Islam & Syed S. Hoque - 1996 - Journal of Biosocial Science 28 (2):129-139.
  35. added 2020-05-15
    The Doctor-Patient Encounter and its Relationship to Theories of Health and Disease.Mark Siegler - 1981 - In Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt & James J. McCartney (eds.), Concepts of Health and Disease: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Addison-Wesley, Advanced Book Program/World Science Division. pp. 627--44.
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  36. added 2020-05-14
    Philosophy of Immunology.Bartlomiej Swiatczak & Alfred I. Tauber - 2020 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2020.
    Philosophy of immunology is a subfield of philosophy of biology dealing with ontological and epistemological issues related to the studies of the immune system. While speculative investigations and abstract analyses have always been part of immune theorizing, until recently philosophers have largely ignored immunology. Yet the implications for understanding the philosophical basis of organismal functions framed by immunity offer new perspectives on fundamental questions of biology and medicine. Developed in the context of history of medicine, theoretical biology, and medical anthropology, (...)
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  37. added 2020-05-13
    Art in the Time of Disease.Srajana Kaikini - 2014 - Journal for Cancer Research and Therapeutics 10 (1):229 -231.
    An invited editorial on the depiction of disease in art history which would then become the symbol of this redemptive philosophy.
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  38. added 2020-04-30
    4 What is a Medical Theory?Paul Thagard - unknown
    Modern medicine has produced many successful theories concerning the causes of diseases. For example, we know that tuberculosis is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and that scurvy is caused by a deficiency of vitamin C. This chapter discusses the nature of medical theories from the perspective of the philosophy, history, and psychology of science. I will review prominent philosophical accounts of what constitutes a scientific theory, and develop a new account of medical theories as representations of mechanisms that explain (...)
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  39. added 2020-04-30
    Foucault on Freud.Andrew Howard - manuscript
    Despite being what is commonly regarded as major influence on Michel Foucault, Freud and psychoanalysis are rarely directly addressed in his works. A notable exception, often cited, is towards the very end of ‘Madness & Civilization’ . Where the early Foucault ends his thesis proposing the conception of madness as social structure with back handed praise by of Freud’s re-engagement with madness via dialogue. Madness, from the mid 1600’s onwards was ignored or 'silenced’ from its ‘zero-point’ of separation as a (...)
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  40. added 2020-04-30
    Classifying Unknowns: The Idiopathic Problem.Thomas Beaney - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (2):126-130.
    The term, idiopathic, emerged as a key concept in the classification of disease in the 18th century and has become ingrained in our terminology in defining diseases and their aetiologies throughout all fields of medicine. Despite, or perhaps because of this, little has been written about the meaning or meanings of the word itself. Although most medical professionals will be able to offer a definition of idiopathic, different definitions of the word are in use and are often confused or used (...)
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  41. added 2020-04-30
    The Neurological Disease Ontology.Mark Jensen, Alexander P. Cox, Naveed Chaudhry, Marcus Ng, Donat Sule, William Duncan, Patrick Ray, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Barry Smith, Alan Ruttenberg, Kinga Szigeti & Alexander D. Diehl - 2013 - Journal of Biomedical Semantics 4 (42):42.
    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) (...)
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  42. added 2020-04-30
    Towards an Ontological Representation of Resistance: The Case of MRSA.Albert Goldfain, Barry Smith & Lindsay G. Cowell - 2011 - Journal of Biomedical Informatics 44 (1):35-41.
    This paper addresses a family of issues surrounding the biological phenomenon of resistance and its representation in realist ontologies. The treatments of resistance terms in various existing ontologies are examined and found to be either overly narrow, internally inconsistent, or otherwise problematic. We propose a more coherent characterization of resistance in terms of what we shall call blocking dispositions, which are collections of mutually coordinated dispositions which are of such a sort that they cannot undergo simultaneous realization within a single (...)
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  43. added 2020-04-30
    The Mystery of the Mystery of Common Genetic Diseases.Sean A. Valles - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (2):183-201.
    Common monogenic genetic diseases, ones that have unexpectedly high frequencies in certain populations, have attracted a great number of conflicting evolutionary explanations. This paper will attempt to explain the mystery of why two particularly extensively studied common genetic diseases, Tay Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis, remain evolutionary mysteries despite decades of research. I review the most commonly cited evolutionary processes used to explain common genetic diseases: reproductive compensation, random genetic drift (in the context of founder effect), and especially heterozygote advantage. (...)
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  44. added 2020-04-30
    The Missing Developmental Dimension in the Network Perspective.Sam Wass & Annette Karmiloff-Smith - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):175-176.
    We welcome network theory as a tool for modelling the multi-directional interactions that characterise disease. However, we feel that Cramer et al. have neglected one important aspect: how diseases change over developmental time. We discuss principles such as fan in, fan out, bottlenecks, and common pathways, and argue that modelling these developmental aspects can be vital, particularly in deriving properly targeted treatments.
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  45. added 2020-04-30
    Conversion Gait Disorder—Meeting Patients in Behaviour, Reuniting Body and Mind.Ejgil Jespersen, Anika A. Jordbru & Egil Martinsen - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):185-199.
    The Hospital for Rehabilitation, Stavern, in Norway has treated patients with physical symptoms with no organic cause, so called conversion disorder patients, for over a decade. For four years research on the treatment has been carried out. Patients with conversion disorder seem not to fit in traditional somatic hospitals because their patienthood depends upon psychiatric diagnosis. Ironically, they appear not to belong in psychiatric hospitals because of their physical symptoms. The treatment offered these patients at hospitals for rehabilitation is adapted (...)
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  46. added 2020-04-30
    History of Disease and the Longue Durée.Jon Arrizabalaga - 2005 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 27 (1):41 - 56.
    This paper summarizes Grmek's theoretical contribution to history of disease and explores to what extent the longue durée could still be a useful concept in order to better understand past perceptions of, and reactions to, diseases. The case of the medical responses to epidemic disease in pre-industrial Europe is synthetically expounded in order to illustrate this issue.
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  47. added 2020-04-30
    A Strategy for Improving and Integrating Biomedical Ontologies.Cornelius Rosse, Anand Kumar, Jose L. V. Mejino, Daniel L. Cook, Landon T. Detwiler & Barry Smith - 2005 - In Proceedings of the Annual Symposium of the American Medical Informatics Association. AMIA. pp. 639-643.
    The integration of biomedical terminologies is indispensable to the process of information integration. When terminologies are linked merely through the alignment of their leaf terms, however, differences in context and ontological structure are ignored. Making use of the SNAP and SPAN ontologies, we show how three reference domain ontologies can be integrated at a higher level, through what we shall call the OBR framework (for: Ontology of Biomedical Reality). OBR is designed to facilitate inference across the boundaries of domain ontologies (...)
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  48. added 2020-04-30
    The Human Body as Field of Conflict Between Discourses.Gerrit K. Kimsma & Evert van Leeuwen - 2005 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):559-574.
    The approach to AIDS as a disease and a threat for social discrimination is used as an example to illustrate a conceptual thesis. This thesis is a claim that concerns what we call a medical issue or not, what is medicalised or needs to be demedicalised. In the friction between medicalisation and demedicalisation as discursive strategies the latter approach can only be effected through the employment of discourses or discursive strategies other than medicine, such as those of the law and (...)
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  49. added 2020-04-30
    Does Hiv or Poverty Cause Aids? Biomedical and Epidemiological Perspectives.Albert Mosley - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (5-6):399-421.
    This paper contrasts biomedical and epidemiological approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of disease, and uses Collingwoods principle of the relativity of causes to show how different approaches focus on different causal factors reflecting different interests. By distinguishing between the etiology of a disease and an epidemic, the paper argues that, from an epidemiological perspective, poverty is an important causal factor in the African AIDS epidemic and that emphasizing this should not be considered incompatible with recognizing the causal necessity of (...)
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  50. added 2020-04-30
    On the Zoosemiotics of Health and Disease.Aleksei Turovski - 2002 - Sign Systems Studies 30 (1):213-218.
    The main feature of the signs of health in the animal habitus and behaviour can be characterised as the readiness to adequately (for a species) serve the need for impression (in animalistic elements of the Umwelt). The signs of disease, however multifarious and diverse, generally display certain lack of Umwelt-oriented attentiveness, alertness. Attention of deeply afflicted animals is strongly Innenwelt-oriented; and in some species a set of such signs, suggesting sickness or mortal disease is used as a set of traits (...)
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