26 found
Order:
See also
Alex Broadbent
University of Johannesburg
  1. Inferring Causation in Epidemiology: Mechanisms, Black Boxes, and Contrasts.Alex Broadbent - 2011 - In Phyllis McKay Illari, Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (eds.), Causality in the Sciences. Oxford University Press. pp. 45--69.
    This chapter explores the idea that causal inference is warranted if and only if the mechanism underlying the inferred causal association is identified. This mechanistic stance is discernible in the epidemiological literature, and in the strategies adopted by epidemiologists seeking to establish causal hypotheses. But the exact opposite methodology is also discernible, the black box stance, which asserts that epidemiologists can and should make causal inferences on the basis of their evidence, without worrying about the mechanisms that might underlie their (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  2. Causes of Causes.Alex Broadbent - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 158 (3):457-476.
    When is a cause of a cause of an effect also a cause of that effect? The right answer is either Sometimes or Always . In favour of Always , transitivity is considered by some to be necessary for distinguishing causes from redundant non-causal events. Moreover transitivity may be motivated by an interest in an unselective notion of causation, untroubled by principles of invidious discrimination. And causal relations appear to add up like transitive relations, so that the obtaining of the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  3.  80
    Causation and Models of Disease in Epidemiology.Alex Broadbent - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 40 (4):302-311.
    Nineteenth-century medical advances were entwined with a conceptual innovation: the idea that many cases of disease which were previously thought to have diverse causes could be explained by the action of a single kind of cause, for example a certain bacterial or parasitic infestation. The focus of modern epidemiology, however, is on chronic non-communicable diseases, which frequently do not seem to be attributable to any single causal factor. This paper is an effort to resolve the resulting tension. The paper criticises (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  4. Fact and Law in the Causal Inquiry.Alex Broadbent - 2009 - Legal Theory 15 (3):173-191.
    This paper takes it as a premise that a distinction between matters of fact and of law is important in the causal inquiry. But it argues that separating factual and legal causation as different elements of liability is not the best way to implement the fact/law distinction. What counts as a cause-in-fact is partly a legal question; and certain liability-limiting doctrines under the umbrella of “legal causation” depend on the application of factual-causal concepts. The contrastive account of factual causation proposed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  5. Prediction in Epidemiology and Medicine.Jonathan Fuller, Alex Broadbent & Luis J. Flores - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C.
  6.  43
    Evolution and Epistemic Justification.Michael Vlerick & Alex Broadbent - 2015 - Dialectica 69 (2):185-203.
    According to the evolutionary sceptic, the fact that our cognitive faculties evolved radically undermines their reliability. A number of evolutionary epistemologists have sought to refute this kind of scepticism. This paper accepts the success of these attempts, yet argues that refuting the evolutionary sceptic is not enough to put any particular domain of beliefs – notably scientific beliefs, which include belief in Darwinian evolution – on a firm footing. The paper thus sets out to contribute to this positive justificatory project, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  7. Defining Neglected Disease.Alex Broadbent - 2011 - Biosocieties 6 (1):51-70.
    In this article I seek to say what it is for something to count as a neglected disease. I argue that neglect should be defined in terms of efforts at prevention, mitigation and cure, and not solely in terms of research dollars per disability-adjusted life-year. I further argue that the trend towards multifactorialism and risk factor thinking in modern epidemiology has lent credibility to the erroneous view that the primary problem with neglected diseases is a lack of research. A more (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. The New Riddle of Causation.Alex Broadbent - unknown
    We commonly distinguish causes from mere conditions, for example by saying that the strike caused the match to light but by failing to mention the presence of oxygen. Philosophers from Mill to Lewis have dismissed this common practice as irrelevant to the philosophical analysis of causation. In this paper, however, I argue that causal selection poses a puzzle of just the same form as Hume's sceptical challenge to the notion of necessary connection. I then propose a solution in terms of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  72
    The Difference Between Cause and Condition.Alex Broadbent - 2008 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):355-364.
    Commonly we distinguish the strike of a match, as a cause of the match lighting, from the presence of oxygen, as a mere condition. In this paper I propose an account of this phenomenon, which I call causal selection. I suggest some reasons for taking causal selection seriously, and indicate some shortcomings of the popular contrastive approach. Chief among these is the lack of an account of contrast choice. I propose that contrast choice is often just the counterfactual scenario in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  10.  14
    Disease as a Theoretical Concept: The Case of “HPV-Itis”.Alex Broadbent - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48:250-257.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11. Reversing the Counterfactual Analysis of Causation.Alex Broadbent - 2007 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (2):169 – 189.
    The counterfactual analysis of causation has focused on one particular counterfactual conditional, taking as its starting-point the suggestion that C causes E iff (C E). In this paper, some consequences are explored of reversing this counterfactual, and developing an account starting with the idea that C causes E iff (E C). This suggestion is discussed in relation to the problem of pre-emption. It is found that the 'reversed' counterfactual analysis can handle even the most difficult cases of pre-emption with only (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12.  18
    Causation and Prediction in Epidemiology: A Guide to the “Methodological Revolution”.Alex Broadbent - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 54:72-80.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  19
    Moore , Michael S. Causation and Responsibility: An Essay in Law, Morals, and Metaphysics .Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. 605. $50.00 (Paper). [REVIEW]Alex Broadbent - 2011 - Ethics 121 (3):669-674.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  10
    Epidemiological Evidence in Proof of Specific Causation.Alex Broadbent - 2011 - Legal Theory 17 (4):237-278.
    This paper seeks to determine the significance, if any, of epidemiological evidence to prove the specific causation element of liability in negligence or other relevant torts—in particular, what importance can be attached to a relative risk > 2, where that figure represents a sound causal inference at the general level. The paper discusses increased risk approaches to epidemiological evidence and concludes that they are a last resort. The paper also criticizes the proposal that the probability of causation can be estimated (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  9
    Health as a Secondary Property.Alex Broadbent - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    In the literature on health, naturalism and normativism are typically characterized as espousing and rejecting, respectively, the view that health is objective and value-free. This article points out that there are two distinct dimensions of disagreement, regarding objectivity and value-ladenness, and thus arranges naturalism and normativism as diagonal opposites on a two-by-two matrix of possible positions. One of the remaining quadrants is occupied by value-dependent realism, holding that health facts are value-laden and objective. The remaining quadrant, which holds that they (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. A Reverse Counterfactual Analysis of Causation.Alex Broadbent - 2007 - Dissertation, University of Cambridge
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  1
    Prediction, Understanding, and Medicine.Alex Broadbent - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine 43 (3):289-305.
    What is medicine? One obvious answer in the context of the contemporary clinical tradition is that medicine is the process of curing sick people. However, this “curative thesis” is not satisfactory, even when “cure” is defined generously and even when exceptions such as cosmetic surgery are set aside. Historian of medicine Roy Porter argues that the position of medicine in society has had, and still has, little to do with its ability to make people better. Moreover, the efficacy of medicine (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  27
    Beyond Bioethics: The 5th International Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable.Jeremy R. Simon, Alex Broadbent & Fred Gifford - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (1):1-5.
    We are pleased to once again present to the readers of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics papers from the Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable. Previous issues have followed the 3rd and 4th Roundtables, and the current issue presents a selection from the more than 20 papers presented at the 5th Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable, which took place in New York, at Columbia University, in November 2013. Like its predecessors, held in Birmingham, AL, Rotterdam, and San Sebastian, this Roundtable attracted speakers from around (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  13
    Prediction in Epidemiology and Medicine.Jonathan Fuller, Alex Broadbent & Luis J. Flores - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 54:45-48.
  20.  1
    Moore, Michael S. Causation and Responsibility: An Essay in Law, Morals, and Metaphysics.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. 605. $50.00. [REVIEW]Alex Broadbent - 2011 - Ethics 121 (3):669-674.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  11
    Book Review Jeremy Howick , The Philosophy of Evidence-Based Medicine . Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell (2011), 248 Pp., $61.95 (Paper). [REVIEW]Alex Broadbent - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (1):165-168.
  22.  4
    Explanation and Responsibility.Alex Broadbent - 2013 - In Markus Stepanians & Benedikt Kahmen (eds.), Critical Essays on "Causation and Responsibility". De Gruyter. pp. 239-252.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Book ReviewJeremy Howick, The Philosophy of Evidence-Based Medicine. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell , 248 Pp., $61.95.Alex Broadbent - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (1):165-168.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Intellectualizing Medicine: A Reply to Commentaries on “Prediction, Understanding, and Medicine”.Alex Broadbent - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine 43 (3):325-341.
    This article is a reply to two critics of my “Prediction, Understanding, and Medicine,” published elsewhere in this journal issue. In that essay, I argued that medicine is best understood not as essentially a curative enterprise, but rather as one essentially oriented towards prediction and understanding. Here, I defend this position from several criticisms made of it.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Philosophy for Graduate Students: Metaphysics and Epistemology.Alex Broadbent - 2016 - Routledge.
    When graduate students start their studies, they usually have sound knowledge of some areas of philosophy, but the overall map of their knowledge is often patchy and disjointed. There are a number of topics that any contemporary philosopher working in any part of the analytic tradition needs to grasp, and to grasp as a coherent whole rather than a rag-bag of interesting but isolated discussions. This book answers this need, by providing a overview of core topics in metaphysics and epistemology (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Public Health.Alex Broadbent & Sridhar Venkatapuram (eds.) - 2018 - Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography