Epistemic Vigilance

Mind and Language 25 (4):359-393 (2010)
Abstract
Humans massively depend on communication with others, but this leaves them open to the risk of being accidentally or intentionally misinformed. To ensure that, despite this risk, communication remains advantageous, humans have, we claim, a suite of cognitive mechanisms for epistemic vigilance. Here we outline this claim and consider some of the ways in which epistemic vigilance works in mental and social life by surveying issues, research and theories in different domains of philosophy, linguistics, cognitive psychology and the social sciences
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DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0017.2010.01394.x
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References found in this work BETA
Belief's Own Ethics.J. Adler - 2002 - MIT Press.
Relevance.D. Sperber & D. Wilson - 1995 - Blackwell.
Studies in the Way of Words.H. P. Grice - 1989 - Harvard University Press.

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Why Do Humans Reason? Arguments for an Argumentative Theory.Dan Sperber - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):57.
Where Philosophical Intuitions Come From.Helen De Cruz - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (2):233-249.

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