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Anne L. Bezuidenhout [5]Anne Louise Bezuidenhout [1]
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Anne Louise Bezuidenhout
University of South Carolina
  1. The Communication of de Re Thoughts.Anne L. Bezuidenhout - 1997 - Noûs 31 (2):197-225.
  2. The Philosophy of P. F. Strawson.Anne L. Bezuidenhout, L. E. Hahn & P. F. Strawson - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (3):460.
    This is the twenty-sixth volume in the Library of Living Philosophers, a series founded by Paul A. Schilpp in 1939 and edited by him until 1981, when the editorship was taken over by Lewis E. Hahn. This volume follows the design of previous volumes. As Schilpp conceived this series, every volume would have the following elements: an intellectual autobiography of the philosopher, a series of expository and critical articles written by exponents and opponents of the philosopher's thought, replies to these (...)
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  3.  43
    Language as Internal.Anne L. Bezuidenhout - 2006 - In Barry C. Smith (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press. pp. 127--139.
    According to internalist conceptions of language, languages are properties of the mind/brains of individuals and supervene entirely on the internal states of these mind/brains. Hence, languages are primarily to be studied by the mind and/or brain sciences — psychology, neuroscience, and the cognitive sciences more generally. This is not to deny that other sciences may contribute to our understanding too. The internalist conception of language is most associated with Chomsky, who has argued for it in many of his writings. Chomsky (...)
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  4.  19
    Holism: A Consumer Update.Anne L. Bezuidenhout (ed.) - 1993 - Amsterdam: Rodopi.
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  5. The Cognitive Constraints on Singular Thought.Anne Louise Bezuidenhout - 1990 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    An initial distinction is made between two ways of referring in thought to a particular object. One can think of an object in virtue of having a descriptive condition in mind which uniquely denotes that object. Alternatively, one can think about a particular in a more direct way. It is with the nature of this more direct sort of reference that the subsequent discussion is primarily concerned. ;It has been argued that the relation of direct reference is purely causal in (...)
     
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  6.  46
    The Impossibility of Punctate Mental Representations.Anne L. Bezuidenhout - 1993 - In Grazer Philosophische Studien. Amsterdam: Rodopi. pp. 197-212.
    In Holism: A Shopper's Guide Fodor and LePore contend that there could be punctate minds; minds capable of being in only a single type of representational state. The Kantian idea that the construction of perceptual representations requires the synthesizing activity of the mind is invoked to argue against the possibility of punctate minds. Fodor's commitment to an inferential theory of perception is shown to share crucial assumptions with the Kantian view and hence to lead to the same conclusion. The argument (...)
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