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  1.  3
    Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Thomas Hobbes by Timothy Raylor.Arthur E. Walzer - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (4):477-481.
    In Reason and Rhetoric in the Philosophy of Hobbes, Quentin Skinner argued, first, that Thomas Hobbes’s philosophy is best understood when placed within the context of the study of rhetoric in Early Modern England and, second, that Hobbes’s attitude toward rhetoric changed in the course of his career: that he passed from a period in which he embraced civic humanism, with its emphasis on rhetoric to one of adamantly rejecting rhetoric in the late 1630s and 1640s, only to reembrace rhetoric (...)
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    The Rhetoric of Counsel and Thomas Elyot's Of the Knowledge Which Maketh a Wise Man.Arthur E. Walzer - 2012 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 45 (1):24.
    In his life of Plato, Diogenes Laertius describes a confrontation between Plato and the emperor of Sicily, Dionysius I (ca. 430–367 BCE). According to Diogenes, Plato was visiting Sicily when he was summoned by Dionysius to discuss political philosophy—the different types of constitutions and governments. Diogenes reports that Plato told the emperor, known as the “tyrant of Sicily,” that tyranny is not the best form of government unless the tyrant is preeminent in virtue; otherwise, tyranny works to the advantage of (...)
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    The Rhetoric of Plato's "Republic": Democracy and the Philosophical Problem of Persuasion by James L. Kastely.Arthur E. Walzer - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (2):228-232.
    In chapters on the Gorgias and the Meno in his 1997 From Plato to Postmodernism, James Kasterly argues that an important point made in the Gorgias is that Socrates fails to persuade Callicles. Its lesson is that philosophers will never succeed in persuading nonphilosophers if they rely on dialectic, with its premises grounded in epistemology, and in the Meno, he finds a type of dialectic that functions rhetorically. In this new book, The Rhetoric of Plato's "Republic": Democracy and the Philosophical (...)
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