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  1.  67
    On Preferring God's Non-Existence.Klaas J. Kraay & Chris Dragos - 2013 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):157-178.
    For many centuries, philosophers have debated this question: “Does God exist?” Surprisingly, they have paid rather less attention to this distinct – but also very important – question: “Would God’s existence be a good thing?” The latter is an axiological question about the difference in value that God’s existence would make (or does make) in the actual world. Perhaps the most natural position to take, whether or not one believes in God, is to hold that it would be a very (...)
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  2.  29
    The No-Minimum Argument, Satisficing, and No-Best-World: A Reply to Jeff Jordan.Chris Dragos - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (3):421-429.
  3.  21
    Epistemic Autonomy and Group Knowledge.Chris Dragos - forthcoming - Synthese:1-21.
    I connect two increasingly popular ideas in social epistemology—group knowledge and epistemic extension—both departures from mainstream epistemological tradition. In doing so, I generate a framework for conceptualizing and organizing contemporary epistemology along several core axes. This, in turn, allows me to delineate a largely unexplored frontier in group epistemology. The bulk of extant work in group epistemology can be dubbed intra-group epistemology: the study of epistemically salient happenings within groups. I delineate and attempt to motivate what I dub inter-group epistemology: (...)
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  4.  27
    Which Groups Have Scientific Knowledge? Wray Vs. Rolin.Chris Dragos - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (5-6):611-623.
    Kristina Rolin and Brad Wray agree with an increasing number of epistemologists that knowledge can sometimes be attributed to a group and to none of its individual members. That is, collective knowledge sometimes obtains. However, Rolin charges Wray with being too restrictive about the kinds of groups to which he attributes collective knowledge. She rejects Wray’s claim that only scientific research teams can know while the general scientific community cannot. Rolin forwards a ‘default and challenge’ account of epistemic justification toward (...)
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  5.  9
    Changing Your Mind, Closing Your Mind: Menachem Fisch: Creatively Undecided: Towards a History and Philosophy of Scientific Agency. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017, 295pp, $37.50 PB.Chris Dragos - 2019 - Metascience 28 (1):33-35.
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  6.  25
    Epistemic Authority: A Theory of Trust, Autonomy, and Authority in Belief, by Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski.Chris Dragos - 2015 - Faith and Philosophy 32 (2):211-219.
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  7.  25
    Groups Can Know How.Chris Dragos - 2019 - American Philosophical Quarterly 56 (3):265-276.
    One can know how to ride a bicycle, play the cello, or collect experimental data. But who can know how to properly ride a tandem bicycle, perform a symphony, or run a high-energy physics experiment? Reductionist analyses fail to account for these cases strictly in terms of the individual know-how involved. Nevertheless, it doesn't follow from non-reductionism that groups possess this know-how. One must first show that epistemic extension cannot obtain. This is the idea that individuals can possess knowledge even (...)
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  8.  14
    Knowledge and Groups: Michael S. Brady and Miranda Fricker : The Epistemic Life of Groups: Essays in the Epistemology of Collectives. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2016, $74.00 HB.Chris Dragos - 2017 - Metascience 26 (2):215-218.
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  9.  2
    Social Epistemology: What’s in a Name?: Miranda Fricker, Peter J. Graham, David Henderson, and Nikolaj J.L.L. Pederson (Eds): The Routledge Handbook of Social Epistemology. London: Routledge, 2019, 490 Pp, £190.00 HB.Chris Dragos - 2020 - Metascience 29 (3):399-401.
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