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David M. Craig [13]David Melville Craig [1]
  1.  8
    Religious Values in the Health Care Market.David M. Craig - 2008 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 28 (2):223-243.
    USING QUALITATIVE INTERVIEWS AT CATHOLIC AND JEWISH HOSPITAL organizations, this essay contrasts the market-driven reforms of consumer-directed health care and physician entrepreneurship with the mission-driven structures of religious nonprofits. A structural analysis of values in health care makes a convoluted system more transparent. It also demonstrates the limitations of market reforms to the extent that they erode organizational structures of solidarity, which are needed to pool risks, shift costs, and maintain safety nets in a complex and expensive health economy.
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  2.  35
    Religious Health Care as Community Benefit: Social Contract, Covenant, or Common Good?David M. Craig - 2008 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (4):pp. 301-330.
    The public responsibilities of nonprofit hospitals have been contested since the advent of the 1969 community benefit standard. The distance between the standard's legal language and its implementation has grown so large that the Internal Revenue Service issued a new reporting form for 2008 that is modeled on the Catholic Health Association's guidelines for its member hospitals. This article analyzes the appearance of an emerging moral consensus about community benefits to argue against a strict charity care mandate and in favor (...)
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  3.  11
    Naves and Nukes: John Ruskin as "Augustinian" Social Theorist?David M. Craig - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (2):325 - 356.
    John Milbank appropriates John Ruskin as part of his "Augustinian" tradition. Milbank's selective reading, however, omits Ruskin's fixed hierarchies as well as his acknowledgment of conflict in economic life. Neither of these ideas fits the social aesthetics of harmony and difference that Milbank claims is unique to Christian theology. While Milbank's strictly theoretical portrait of theology gains critical force from Ruskin's robust account of social practices and just exchange, Milbank lacks effective historical and institutional responses to the problems in Ruskin's (...)
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  4.  21
    By Author.David M. Craig, Robert I. Field, Ar Caplan, John P. Gluck, Mark T. Holdsworth, Bert Gordijn, L. Norbert, Henk A. M. J. ten Have, Norbert L. Steinkamp & Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2008 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (4):405-407.
  5. Comment [on Hicks (2002) and Beckley].David M. Craig - 2003 - Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (1):153-8.
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  6.  13
    Debating Desire.David M. Craig - 2007 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 27 (1):157-182.
    THE CIVIL RIGHTS PROTESTS OF THE 1950S AND 1960S WERE AS MUCH about challenging normative conceptions of good desire as they were about claiming individual rights. Staged as rituals, these protests dramatized the social borders and sentiments existing in American society, and they performed a transforming vision of the desires and purposes appropriate to democratic citizens and institutions. This analysis of the reason-giving potential of ritual challenges John Rawls's criterion of "reciprocity" as the constraint on public reason and democratic legitimacy. (...)
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  7. Everyone at the Table: Religious Activism and Health Care Reform in Massachusetts.David M. Craig - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):335-358.
    Using interviews with activists and Lisa Sowle Cahill's concept of participatory discourse, this article examines how the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization (GBIO) built solidarity for the 2006 Massachusetts health care reform law. The analysis explores the morally formative connections between GBIO's activist strategies and its public liturgy for reform. The solidarity generated through this interfaith coalition's activities and religious arguments contrasts with two standard types of policy discourse, economics and liberalism. Arguments for health care reform based on economic efficiency or (...)
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  8.  14
    First Page Preview.David M. Craig - 2003 - History of European Ideas 29 (4).
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  9.  1
    M. Therese Lysaught and Michael McCarthy : Catholic Bioethics and Social Justice: The Praxis of US Health Care in a Globalized World: Liturgical Press, Collegeville, MN, 2018. [REVIEW]David M. Craig - 2019 - Monash Bioethics Review 37 (3-4):136-138.
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  10.  29
    Comment by David M. Craig.David M. Craig - 2003 - Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (1):153-158.
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