8 found
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  1.  38
    Is Nutritional Advocacy Morally Indigestible? A Critical Analysis of the Scientific and Ethical Implications of 'Healthy' Food Choice Discourse in Liberal Societies.Christopher Mayes & Donald B. Thompson - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):158-169.
    Medical and non-medical experts increasingly argue that individuals, whether they are diagnosed with a specific chronic disease or condition or not (and whether they are judged at minimal risk of these consequences or not), have an obligation to make ‘healthy’ food choices. We argue that this obligation is neither scientifically nor ethically justified at the level of the individual. Our intent in the article is not simply to argue against moralization of the value of prudential uses of food for nutritional (...)
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  2.  55
    What Should We Eat? Biopolitics, Ethics, and Nutritional Scientism.Christopher R. Mayes & Donald B. Thompson - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):587-599.
    Public health advocates, government agencies, and commercial organizations increasingly use nutritional science to guide food choice and diet as a way of promoting health, preventing disease, or marketing products. We argue that in many instances such references to nutritional science can be characterized as nutritional scientism. We examine three manifestations of nutritional scientism: the simplification of complex science to increase the persuasiveness of dietary guidance, superficial and honorific references to science in order to justify cultural or ideological views about food (...)
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  3.  34
    Shifting the focus: Conflict of interest and the food industry.Jonathan H. Marks & Donald B. Thompson - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):44 - 46.
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  4.  64
    What Food is “Good” for You? Toward a Pragmatic Consideration of Multiple Values Domains.Donald B. Thompson & Bryan McDonald - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):137-163.
    What makes a food good, for you? With respect to food, the expression “good for you” usually refers to the effect of the food on the nutritional health of the eater, but it can also pertain more broadly. The expression is often used by a person who is concerned with another person’s well-being, as part of an exhortation. But when framed as a question and addressed to you, as an individual, the question can require a response, calling for accountability beyond (...)
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  5.  12
    Solidarity and Public Health.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias & Donald B. Thompson - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (3):371-382.
    We argue that an unqualified use of the term solidarity in public health is not only equivocal but problematic toward the ends of public health. The term may be deployed normatively by public health advocates to strengthen the bonds among public health practitioners and refer to an ideal society in which the importance of interdependence among members ought to be acknowledged throughout the polity. We propose an important distinction between partisan solidarity and societal solidarity. Because any moralized belief in a (...)
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  6.  12
    Evaluating Public Health Effectiveness of Alcohol Label Warnings.Donald B. Thompson - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):23-24.
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  7.  6
    Healthy Eating Policy, Public Reason, and the Common Good.Donald B. Thompson - 2023 - Food Ethics 8 (2):1-20.
    The contribution of food and diet to health is much disputed in the background culture in the US. Many commercial or ideological advocates make claims, sometimes with health as a primary goal, but often accompanied by commercial or ideological interests. These compete culturally with authoritative recommendations made by publicly funded groups. For public policy concerning diet and health to be legitimate, not only should it not be inconsistent with the scientific evidence, but also it should not be inconsistent with the (...)
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  8.  42
    Natural Food and the Pastoral: A Sentimental Notion? [REVIEW]Donald B. Thompson - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (2):165-194.
    The term natural is effective in the marketing of a wide variety of foods. This ambiguous term carries important meaning in Western culture. To challenge an uncritical understanding of natural with respect to food and to explore the ambiguity of the term, the development of Western ideas of nature is first discussed. Personification and hypostasization of nature are given special emphasis. Leo Marx’s idea of the pastoral design in literature is then used to explore the meaning of natural as applied (...)
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