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  1. Judging the morality of business practices: The influence of personal moral philosophies. [REVIEW]Donelson R. Forsyth - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (5-6):461 - 470.
    Individuals'' moral judgments of certain business practices and their decisions to engage in those practices are influenced by their personal moral philosophies: (a) situationists advocate striving for the best consequences possible irrespective of moral maxims; (b) subjectivists reject moral guidelines and base judgments on personal values and practical concerns; (c) absolutists assume that actions are moral, provided they yield positive consequences and conform to moral rules; (d) exceptionists prefer to follow moral dictates but allow for exceptions for practical reasons. These (...)
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  2. East Meets West: A Meta-Analytic Investigation of Cultural Variations in Idealism and Relativism.Donelson R. Forsyth, Ernest H. O’Boyle & Michael A. McDaniel - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):813-833.
    Ethics position theory (EPT) maintains that individuals’ personal moral philosophies influence their judgments, actions, and emotions in ethically intense situations. The theory, when describing these moral viewpoints, stresses two dimensions: idealism (concern for benign outcomes) and relativism (skepticism with regards to inviolate moral principles). Variations in idealism and relativism across countries were examined via a meta-analysis of studies that assessed these two aspects of moral thought using the ethics position questionnaire (EPQ; Forsyth, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 39, 175–184, (...)
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  3.  12
    Sexual attitudes and moral values: The importance of idealism and relativism.Betsy Singh & Donelson R. Forsyth - 1989 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (2):160-162.
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  4.  15
    Attributions and moral judgments: Kohlberg’s stage theory as a taxonomy of moral attributions.Donelson R. Forsyth & William L. Scott - 1984 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (4):321-323.
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  5.  31
    The effects of social context and size of injury on perceptions of a harm-doer and victim.Donelson R. Forsyth, Eddie Albritton & Barry R. Schlenker - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (1):37-39.
  6.  1
    Prologue for the special issue on “business ethics in the virtual work environment: Challenges to educators and practitioners”.Venkatesha Murthy, Ananda Das Gupta, Georges Enderle, Samir Chatterjee, Wim Vandekerckhove, Donelson R. Forsyth & Sonali Bhattacharya - 2022 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 11 (Suppl 1):1-5.
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  7.  15
    Judgments of deceptive communications: A multidimensional analysis.William R. Pope & Donelson R. Forsyth - 1986 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (6):435-436.
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  8.  13
    Opinion conformity as an impression management tactic following performance of an unpleasant task.Marc Riess, Donelson R. Forsyth, Barry R. Schlenker & Susan Freed - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (3):211-213.
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  9.  18
    Scientific and common sense reasoning: A comparison. [REVIEW]Donelson R. Forsyth - 1979 - Human Studies 2 (1):159 - 170.
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  10.  6
    The attribution cube and moral evaluations.Donelson R. Forsyth & William R. Pope - 1983 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 21 (2):117-118.
  11.  1
    Humans are not the Borg: Personal and social selves function as components in a unified self-system.Donelson R. Forsyth - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    Does joining groups trigger a cascade of psychological processes that can result in a loss of individuality and lead to such outcomes as social loafing and poor decision-making? Rather than privileging the self comprising primarily individual qualities as the “true self,” a multilevel, multicomponent approach suggests that, in most cases, personal and collective identities are integrated and mutually sustaining.
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