4 found
Order:
  1.  11
    Reflections on the Future University: Introduction.Evy Varsamopoulou - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (1):1-6.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  28
    The Fate of the Humanities, the Fate of the University.Evy Varsamopoulou - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (1):59-73.
    The aim of this article is to analyze the current crisis of higher education and to propose a new model to counter the threat this crisis poses to the arts and humanities. The crisis of the university is presented through a comparison with two earlier crises: the first occurring in the seventeenth century and the second in the early nineteenth century. I argue that as an institution and a culture the mission of the university is to uphold the value of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  7
    The Idea of Europe and the Ideal of Cosmopolitanism in the Work of Julia Kristeva.Evy Varsamopoulou - 2009 - Theory, Culture and Society 26 (1):24-44.
    This article puts forward a critical investigation and comparative assessment of Julia Kristeva's political writing on Europe and cosmopolitanism. Kristeva's reflections on the status of the stranger in the European religious and secular traditions, and her persistent argument on the need to constructively reformulate what is most conducive to a present and future cosmopolitanism from within those traditions and discourses, have already been recognized. What this article addresses is the need for a constructive critical dialogue with the themes and arguments (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  19
    Three Movements of Life: Jan Patočka's Philosophy of Personal Being.Evy Varsamopoulou - 2007 - The European Legacy 12 (5):577-588.
    This article offers a critical presentation of Jan Patočka's philosophy by focusing mainly on his lecture series published as Body, Community, Language, World, where he outlined his phenomenological project of re-instating the body in philosophy. Taking the body and its invariable situatedness as a starting point and identifying useful precursors in European philosophy, Patočka delineates three movements of human life: an affective movement consisting of creating roots, identified as primarily aesthetic and interested in the past; an ascetic movement consisting of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark