8 found
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  1.  37
    Wordform Similarity Increases With Semantic Similarity: An Analysis of 100 Languages.Isabelle Dautriche, Kyle Mahowald, Edward Gibson & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2017 - Cognitive Science:2149-2169.
    Although the mapping between form and meaning is often regarded as arbitrary, there are in fact well-known constraints on words which are the result of functional pressures associated with language use and its acquisition. In particular, languages have been shown to encode meaning distinctions in their sound properties, which may be important for language learning. Here, we investigate the relationship between semantic distance and phonological distance in the large-scale structure of the lexicon. We show evidence in 100 languages from a (...)
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  2.  24
    Words cluster phonetically beyond phonotactic regularities.Isabelle Dautriche, Kyle Mahowald, Edward Gibson, Anne Christophe & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2017 - Cognition 163 (C):128-145.
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  3.  44
    Word Forms Are Structured for Efficient Use.Kyle Mahowald, Isabelle Dautriche, Edward Gibson & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):3116-3134.
    Zipf famously stated that, if natural language lexicons are structured for efficient communication, the words that are used the most frequently should require the least effort. This observation explains the famous finding that the most frequent words in a language tend to be short. A related prediction is that, even within words of the same length, the most frequent word forms should be the ones that are easiest to produce and understand. Using orthographics as a proxy for phonetics, we test (...)
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  4.  35
    Learning novel phonological neighbors: Syntactic category matters.Isabelle Dautriche, Daniel Swingley & Anne Christophe - 2015 - Cognition 143 (C):77-86.
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  5.  24
    Formal Models at the Core.Emmanuel Chemla, Isabelle Charnavel, Isabelle Dautriche, David Embick, Fred Lerdahl, Pritty Patel-Grosz, David Poeppel & Philippe Schlenker - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (3):e13267.
    The grammatical paradigm used to be a model for entire areas of cognitive science. Its primary tenet was that theories are axiomatic-like systems. A secondary tenet was that their predictions should be tested quickly and in great detail with introspective judgments. While the grammatical paradigm now often seems passé, we argue that in fact it continues to be as efficient as ever. Formal models are essential because they are explicit, highly predictive, and typically modular. They make numerous critical predictions, which (...)
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  6.  20
    Phrasal prosody constrains syntactic analysis in toddlers.Alex de Carvalho, Isabelle Dautriche, Isabelle Lin & Anne Christophe - 2017 - Cognition 163 (C):67-79.
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  7.  12
    Competition and Symmetry in an Artificial Word Learning Task.Brian Buccola, Isabelle Dautriche & Emmanuel Chemla - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  8.  7
    Do Backward Associations Have Anything to Say About Language?Thomas F. Chartier & Isabelle Dautriche - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (4):e13282.
    In this letter, we argue against a recurring idea that early word learning in infants is related to the low-level capacity for backward associations—a notion that suggests a cognitive gap with other animal species. Because backward associations entail the formation of bidirectional associations between sequentially perceived stimulus pairs, they seemingly mirror the label-referent bidirectional mental relations underlying the lexicon of natural language. This appealing but spurious resemblance has led to various speculations on language acquisition, in particular regarding early word learning, (...)
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