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  1.  31
    Familial Patterns and the Origins of Individual Differences in Synaesthesia.Kylie J. Barnett, Ciara Finucane, Julian E. Asher, Gary Bargary, Aiden P. Corvin, Fiona N. Newell & Kevin J. Mitchell - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):871-893.
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  2.  47
    Synaesthesia is Associated with Enhanced, Self-Rated Visual Imagery.Kylie J. Barnett & Fiona N. Newell - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):1032-1039.
    Although the condition known as synaesthesia is currently undergoing a scientific resurgence, to date the literature has largely focused on the heterogeneous nature of synaesthesia across individuals. In order to provide a better understanding of synaesthesia, however, general characteristics need to be investigated. Synaesthetic experiences are often described as occurring ‘internally’ or in the ‘mind’s eye’, which is remarkably similar to how we would describe our experience of visual mental imagery. We assessed the role of visual imagery in synaesthesia by (...)
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  3. Cosmelli, Diego, 623 Costantini, Marcello, 229 Cressman, Erin K., 265.Matthew J. C. Crump, Elisabeth Bacon, Kylie J. Barnett, Paolo Bartolomeo, Melissa R. Beck, Jesse J. Bengson, Derek Besner, Victoria Bird, Sylvie Blairy & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):1005-1006.
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  4.  18
    Bilateral Disadvantage: Lack of Interhemispheric Cooperation in Schizophrenia.Kylie J. Barnett, Ian J. Kirk & Michael C. Corballis - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):436-444.
    Language anomalies and left-hemisphere dysfunction are commonly reported in schizophrenia. Additional evidence also suggests differences in the integration of information between the hemispheres. Bilateral gain is the increase in accuracy and decrease in latency that occurs when identical information is presented simultaneously to both hemispheres. This study measured bilateral gain in controls and individuals with schizophrenia using a lexical-decision task where word or non-word judgements were made to letter strings presented in the left visual field , right visual field or (...)
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