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  1.  10
    The Philosophy of Luck.Duncan Pritchard & Lee John Whittington (eds.) - 2015 - Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell.
    "First published as Metaphilosophy volume 45, nos. 4-5, except for 'Luck as risk and the lack of control account of luck,' first published in Metaphilosophy volume 46, no. 2 "--Title page vers.
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  2.  71
    Luck, knowledge and value.Lee John Whittington - 2016 - Synthese 193 (6):1615-1633.
    In a recent set of publications Ballantyne :485–503, 2011, Synthese 185:319–334, 2012, Synthese 91:1391–1407, 2013) argues that luck does not have a significant role in understanding the concept of knowledge. The problem, Ballantyne argues, lies in what is commonly thought to be a necessary condition for luck—a significance or value condition :385–398, 2007; Lackey, in Austral J Philos 86:255–267, 2008, Ballantyne, in Can J Philos 41:485–503, 2011). For an event, like forming a true belief, to be lucky then it must (...)
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  3. Getting Moral Luck Right.Lee John Whittington - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):654-667.
    Moral luck, until recently, has been understood either explicitly or implicitly through using a lack of control account of luck. For example, a case of resultant moral luck is a case where an agent is morally blameworthy or more morally blameworthy or praiseworthy for an outcome despite that outcome being significantly beyond that agent's control . Due to a shift in understanding the concept of luck itself in terms of modal robustness, however, other accounts of moral luck have surfaced. Both (...)
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  4.  7
    Getting Moral Luck Right.Lee John Whittington - 2015 - In Duncan Pritchard & Lee John Whittington (eds.), The Philosophy of Luck. Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 205–218.
    Moral luck, until recently, has been understood either explicitly or implicitly through using a lack of control account of luck. For example, a case of resultant moral luck is a case where an agent is morally blameworthy or more morally blameworthy or praiseworthy for an outcome despite that outcome being significantly beyond that agent's control (Nagel ). Due to a shift in understanding the concept of luck itself in terms of modal robustness, however, other accounts of moral luck have surfaced. (...)
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  5.  10
    Metaphysics of luck.Lee John Whittington - unknown
    Clare, the titular character of The Time Traveller's Wife, reflects that "Everything seems simple until you think about it." This might well be a mantra for the whole of philosophy, but a fair few terms tend to stick out. "Knowledge", "goodness" and "happiness" for example, are all pervasive everyday terms that undergo significant philosophical analysis. "Luck", I think, is another one of these terms. Wishing someone good luck in their projects, and cursing our bad luck when success seems so close (...)
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  6.  25
    Introductory Note.Duncan Pritchard & Lee John Whittington - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):475-476.
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    Introductory Note.Duncan Pritchard & Lee John Whittington - 2015 - In Duncan Pritchard & Lee John Whittington (eds.), The Philosophy of Luck. Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1–2.
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  8.  29
    'The harvest of despair': Catastrophic fear and the understanding of risk in the shadow of Mount Etna.L. Ware & Lee John Whittington - forthcoming - In C. Gerrard (ed.), Waiting for the End of the World: The Archaeology of Risk and its Perception in the Middle Ages. Routledge.
    In this chapter, we offer an account of fear and risk in anticipation of catastrophe. We draw on the narrative response to the Mount Enta volcano in medieval Sicily to frame an evaluation of how fear can be seen to impact the understanding of risk when the event of that risk is the catastrophic suffering of an entire community. We aim to demonstrate how an exploration of the philosophical questions surrounding the emotion of fear and the understanding of risk can (...)
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