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  1.  44
    Practical Dignity in Caring.Leila Shotton & David Seedhouse - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (3):246-255.
    It is difficult to understand the meaning of ‘dignity’ in human rights, bioethics and nursing literature because the word is used so vaguely. Unless dignity’s meaning is spelt out it can disappear beneath more tangible priorities. In this article we define dignity and show how this can help health workers to maintain the dignity of people in their care.
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  2.  12
    Practical Dignity in Caring Leila Shotton Address for Correspondence: Leila Shotton, Lecturer in Bioethics, Department of Philosophy, University of Tasmania at Hobart, Gpo Box 252c-41, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia. [REVIEW]Leila Shotton & David Seedhouse - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (3):246-255.
    It is difficult to understand the meaning of ‘dignity’ in human rights, bioethics and nursing literature because the word is used so vaguely. Unless dignity’s meaning is spelt out it can disappear beneath more tangible priorities. In this article we define dignity and show how this can help health workers to maintain the dignity of people in their care.
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  3.  30
    Book Review: Philosophy for Nursing by Jan Reed and Ian Ground, 1997, Arnold, 165 Pages, £14.99, ISBN 0‐340‐61028‐X. [REVIEW]Leila Shotton - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (3):268-269.
  4.  17
    Teaching Analysis: The Ethics of Teaching Nursing Ethics.Leila Shotton - 1997 - Health Care Analysis 5 (3):259-263.
  5.  11
    Can Nurses Contribute to Better End-of-Life Care?Leila Shotton - 2000 - Nursing Ethics 7 (2):134-140.
    In this article I will argue that futile medical and nursing care is not only inefficacious but that it may be harmful to the patient and also to health professionals, who may be diminished both as clinicians and as persons if they are not able to give appropriate care to dying patients and their families. I discuss futile care in intensive care units because the opportunities and the temptation to provide futile care in these settings is higher than, for instance, (...)
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  6.  10
    Editorial Comment.Leila Shotton - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (5):460-461.
  7.  7
    Conference Report.Leila Shotton - 1997 - Health Care Analysis 5 (4):337-338.
  8.  7
    The Role of Older People in Our Communities.Leila Shotton - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (1):4-17.
    The proportion of older people in the total population is increasing in most countries because of advances in medical technology and resulting longer life expectancy. The role that older people play in our communities does not reflect this. Sometimes they are reduced to mere statistics and stereotypes in economic and political discussions on the financial burdens of care for older people. I argue that we need to rebuild inclusive communities in which older people are respected as valuable members. I suggest (...)
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  9.  10
    The Ethics of Teaching Nursing Ethics.Leila Shotton - 1997 - Health Care Analysis 5 (3):259-263.