16 found
Order:
  1.  14
    Revisiting Supplier Compliance with MNC Codes of Conduct: Recoupling Policy and Practice at Chinese Toy Suppliers.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):59-75.
    Does private regulation of workers’ rights in global value chains improve working conditions on the factory floor? Drawing on one of the first systematic longitudinal studies of supplier compliance with multinational corporation (MNC) codes of conduct, this paper finds—in contrast to previous research—substantial improvements over time. While in 2004, the four examined Chinese toy suppliers violated most of the evaluated code of conduct criteria and consciously decoupled the code of conduct policy from actual practices, by 2009 they had recoupled policy (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  2.  38
    Suppliers' Compliance with Mncs' Codes of Conduct: Behind the Scenes at Chinese Toy Suppliers. [REVIEW]Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):45 - 62.
    Despite increased academic and practitioner interest in codes of conduct, there has been little research into the actual compliance of suppliers in developing countries with the codes of conduct of multinational corporations (MNCs). This paper addresses this lack by analysing Chinese suppliers’ level of compliance with Swedish toy retailers’ codes of conduct. Based on unannounced and unofficial interviews with employees of Chinese suppliers, the study shows that all of the nine studied suppliers breached some of the standards in the toy (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  3.  9
    Suppliers’ Compliance with MNCs’ Codes of Conduct: Behind the Scenes at Chinese Toy Suppliers.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):45-62.
    Despite increased academic and practitioner interest in codes of conduct, there has been little research into the actual compliance of suppliers in developing countries with the codes of conduct of multinational corporations. This paper addresses this lack by analysing Chinese suppliers' level of compliance with Swedish toy retailers' codes of conduct. Based on unannounced and unofficial interviews with employees of Chinese suppliers, the study shows that all of the nine studied suppliers breached some of the standards in the toy retailers' (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  4.  31
    Evaluating Strategies for Negotiating Workers' Rights in Transnational Corporations: The Effects of Codes of Conduct and Global Agreements on Workplace Democracy. [REVIEW]Niklas Egels-Zandén & Peter Hyllman - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):207 - 223.
    Following the offshoring of production to developing countries by transnational corporations (TNCs), unions and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have criticised working conditions at TNCs' offshore factories. This has led to the emergence of two different approaches to operationalising TNC responsibilities for workers' rights in developing countries: codes of conduct and global agreements. Despite the importance of this development, few studies have systematically compared the effects of these two different ways of dealing with workers' rights. This article addresses this gap by analysing (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  5.  33
    Exploring the Effects of Union–NGO Relationships on Corporate Responsibility: The Case of the Swedish Clean Clothes Campaign.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Peter Hyllman - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):303-316.
    In the current era, governments are playing smaller roles in regulating workers’ rights internationally, and transnational corporations (TNCs), non-governmental organisations (NGOs) involved in the struggle for workers’ rights, and labour/trade unions have started to fill this governance gap. This paper focuses on the least researched of the relationships among these three actors, the union–NGO relationship, by analysing the ways in which it affects definitions of TNC responsibility for workers’ rights at their suppliers’ factories. Based on a qualitative study of the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  6.  12
    Evaluating Strategies for Negotiating Workers’ Rights in Transnational Corporations: The Effects of Codes of Conduct and Global Agreements on Workplace Democracy.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Peter Hyllman - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):207-223.
    Following the offshoring of production to developing countries by transnational corporations, unions and non-governmental organisations have criticised working conditions at TNCs' offshore factories. This has led to the emergence of two different approaches to operationalising TNC responsibilities for workers' rights in developing countries: codes of conduct and global agreements. Despite the importance of this development, few studies have systematically compared the effects of these two different ways of dealing with workers' rights. This article addresses this gap by analysing how codes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  7.  22
    Private Regulation and Trade Union Rights: Why Codes of Conduct Have Limited Impact on Trade Union Rights.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Jeroen Merk - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):1-13.
    Codes of conduct are the main tools to privately regulate worker rights in global value chains. Scholars have shown that while codes may improve outcome standards (such as occupational health and safety), they have had limited impact on process rights (such as freedom of association and collective bargaining). Scholars have, though, only provided vague or general explanations for this empirical finding. We address this shortcoming by providing a holistic and detailed explanation, and argue that codes, in their current form, have (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8.  95
    Post-Partnership Strategies for Defining Corporate Responsibility: The Business Social Compliance Initiative.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Evelina Wahlqvist - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):175-189.
    While cross-sectoral partnerships are frequently presented as a way to achieve sustainable development, some corporations that first tried using the strategy are now changing direction. Growing tired of what are, in their eyes, inefficient and unproductive cross-sectoral partnerships, firms are starting to form post-cross-sectoral partnerships (‚post-partnerships’) open exclusively to corporations. This paper examines one such post-partnership project, the Business Social Compliance Initiative (BSCI), to analyse the possibility of post-partnerships establishing stable definitions of ‚corporate responsibility’. We do this by creating a (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  9.  63
    Distinctions in Descriptive and Instrumental Stakeholder Theory: A Challenge for Empirical Research.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Joakim Sandberg - 2010 - Business Ethics: A European Review 19 (1):35-49.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  10.  5
    The Role of SMEs in Global Production Networks: A Swedish SME’s Payment of Living Wages at Its Indian Supplier.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (1):92-129.
    Anti-sweatshop activists have turned global production networks into contested organizational fields. Although this contest has triggered the growth of an extensive literature on contested GPNs, the scholarly conversation is still limited in two important ways: First, it ignores or dismisses the role of small and medium-sized enterprises in GPNs and, second, it assumes that firms are driven solely by rational profit-maximizing motives. Based on a study of a Swedish SME’s payment of living wages at its Indian supplier, this article addresses (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  27
    TNC Motives for Signing International Framework Agreements: A Continuous Bargaining Model of Stakeholder Pressure.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):529-547.
    Over the past decade, discussion has flourished among practitioners and academics regarding workers’ rights in developing countries. The lack of enforcement of national labour laws and the limited protection of workers’ rights in developing countries have led workers’ rights representatives to attempt to establish transnational industrial relations systems to complement existing national systems. In practice, these attempts have mainly been operationalised in unilateral codes of conduct; recently, however, negotiated international framework agreements (IFAs) have been proposed as an alternative. Despite their (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  12.  12
    Responsibility Boundaries in Global Value Chains: Supplier Audit Prioritizations and Moral Disengagement Among Swedish Firms.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):515-528.
    To address substandard working conditions in global value chains, companies have adopted private regulatory systems governing worker rights. Scholars agree that without onsite factory audits, this private regulation has limited impact at the point of production. Companies, however, audit only a subset of their suppliers, severely restricting their private regulatory attempts. Despite the significance of the placement of suppliers inside or outside firms’ “responsibility boundaries” and despite scholars’ having called for more research into how firms prioritize what suppliers to audit, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  29
    Transnational Governance of Workers' Rights: Outlining a Research Agenda. [REVIEW]Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):169 - 188.
    In twentieth century Europe and the USA, industrial relations, labour, and workers’ rights issues have been handled through collective bargaining and industrial agreements between firms and unions, with varying degrees of government intervention from country to country. This industrial relations landscape is currently undergoing fundamental change with the emergence of transnational industrial relations systems that complement existing national industrial relations systems. Despite the significance of this ongoing change, existing research has only started to explore the implications of this change for (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14.  9
    Transnational Governance of Workers’ Rights: Outlining a Research Agenda.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):169-188.
    In twentieth century Europe and the USA, industrial relations, labour, and workers' rights issues have been handled through collective bargaining and industrial agreements between firms and unions, with varying degrees of government intervention from country to country. This industrial relations landscape is currently undergoing fundamental change with the emergence of transnational industrial relations systems that complement existing national industrial relations systems. Despite the significance of this ongoing change, existing research has only started to explore the implications of this change for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  8
    Differences in Organizing Between Unions and NGOs: Conflict and Cooperation Among Swedish Unions and NGOs.Niklas Egels-Zandén & Peter Hyllman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):249-261.
    The protection of workers' rights is at the heart of the ongoing debate on business ethics. In balancing transnational corporations' (TNCs) influence in private regulatory systems intended to protect workers' rights in emerging economies, several authors have emphasized the importance of cooperative relationships between unions and NGOs. In practice, however, conflict has often entered into union-NGO relations, weakening the protection of workers' rights. We argue that cooperative union-NGO relationships are difficult to form in part because of the differences existing between (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  8
    Non Sibi, Sed Omnibus: Influence of Supplier Collective Behaviour on Corporate Social Responsibility in the Bangladeshi Apparel Supply Chain.Enrico Fontana & Niklas Egels-Zandén - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Local supplier corporate social responsibility in developing countries represents a powerful tool to improve labour conditions. This paper pursues an inter-organizational network approach to the global value chain literature to understand the influence of suppliers’ collective behaviour on their CSR engagement. This exploratory study of 30 export-oriented and first-tier apparel suppliers in Bangladesh, a developing country, makes three relevant contributions to GVC scholarship. First, we show that suppliers are interlinked in a horizontal network that restricts unilateral CSR engagement. This is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark