22 found
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  1.  12
    The Influence of Social Category Cues on the Happy Categorisation Advantage Depends on Expression Valence.Belinda M. Craig, Severine Koch & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1493-1501.
    Facial race and sex cues can influence the magnitude of the happy categorisation advantage. It has been proposed that implicit race or sex based evaluations drive this influence. Within this account a uniform influence of social category cues on the happy categorisation advantage should be observed for all negative expressions. Support has been shown with angry and sad expressions but evidence to the contrary has been found for fearful expressions. To determine the generality of the evaluative congruence account, participants categorised (...)
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  2.  8
    The Spider Does Not Always Win the Fight for Attention: Disengagement From Threat is Modulated by Goal Set.Joyce M. G. Vromen, Ottmar V. Lipp & Roger W. Remington - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (7):1185-1196.
  3.  6
    Slithering Snakes, Angry Men and Out-Group Members: What and Whom Are We Evolved to Fear?Kimberley M. Mallan, Ottmar V. Lipp & Benjamin Cochrane - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (7):1168-1180.
  4.  24
    Understanding Recovery From Object Substitution Masking.Stephanie C. Goodhew, Paul E. Dux, Ottmar V. Lipp & Troy A. W. Visser - 2012 - Cognition 122 (3):405-415.
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  5.  14
    The Effect of Face Inversion on the Detection of Emotional Faces in Visual Search.Ruth A. Savage & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (6):972-991.
  6.  18
    Facial Age Cues and Emotional Expression Interact Asymmetrically: Age Cues Moderate Emotion Categorisation.Belinda M. Craig & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (2):350-362.
    Facial attributes such as race, sex, and age can interact with emotional expressions; however, only a couple of studies have investigated the nature of the interaction between facial age cues and emotional expressions and these have produced inconsistent results. Additionally, these studies have not addressed the mechanism/s driving the influence of facial age cues on emotional expression or vice versa. In the current study, participants categorised young and older adult faces expressing happiness and anger or sadness by their age and (...)
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  7.  14
    Visual Search for Schematic Emotional Faces: Angry Faces Are More Than Crosses.Daina S. E. Dickins & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2014 - Cognition and Emotion 28 (1):98-114.
  8.  11
    Individual Differences in Higher-Level Cognitive Abilities Do Not Predict Overconfidence in Complex Task Performance.Troy A. W. Visser, Angela D. Bender, Vanessa K. Bowden, Stephanie C. Black, Jayden Greenwell-Barnden, Shayne Loft & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 74:102777.
  9.  8
    No Support for Dual Process Accounts of Human Affective Learning in Simple Pavlovian Conditioning.Ottmar V. Lipp & Helena M. Purkis - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (2):269-282.
    Dual process accounts of affective learning state that the learning of likes and dislikes reflects a learning mechanism that is distinct from the one reflected in expectancy learning, the learning of signal relationships, and has different empirical characteristics. Affective learning, for example, is said not to be affected by: (a) extinction training; (b) occasion setting; (c) cue competition; and (d) awareness of the CS-US contingencies. These predictions were tested in a series of experiments that employed simple Pavlovian conditioning procedures. Neutral (...)
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  10.  7
    Better Safe Than Sorry: Simplistic Fear-Relevant Stimuli Capture Attention.Sarah J. Forbes, Helena M. Purkis & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (5):794-804.
    It has been consistently demonstrated that fear-relevant images capture attention preferentially over fear-irrelevant images. Current theory suggests that this faster processing could be mediated by an evolved module that allows certain stimulus features to attract attention automatically, prior to the detailed processing of the image. The present research investigated whether simplified images of fear-relevant stimuli would produce interference with target detection in a visual search task. In Experiment 1, silhouettes and degraded silhouettes of fear-relevant animals produced more interference than did (...)
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  11.  5
    Temporal Contexts: Filling the Gap Between Episodic Memory and Associative Learning.Helena Matute, Ottmar V. Lipp, Miguel A. Vadillo & Michael S. Humphreys - 2011 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 140 (4):660-673.
  12. Does Affective Learning Exist in the Absence of Contingency Awareness?Helena M. Purkis & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2001 - Learning and Motivation 32 (1):84-99.
  13.  6
    Selective Processing of Masked and Unmasked Verbal Threat Material in Anxiety: Influence of an Immediate Acute Stressor.Mark S. Edwards, Jennifer S. Burt & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2006 - Cognition and Emotion 20 (6):812-835.
  14.  26
    Searching for Emotion or Race: Task-Irrelevant Facial Cues Have Asymmetrical Effects.Ottmar V. Lipp, Belinda M. Craig, Mareka J. Frost, Deborah J. Terry & Joanne R. Smith - 2014 - Cognition and Emotion 28 (6):1100-1109.
  15.  18
    Implicit Semantic Perception in Object Substitution Masking.Stephanie C. Goodhew, Troy A. W. Visser, Ottmar V. Lipp & Paul E. Dux - 2011 - Cognition 118 (1):130-134.
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  16.  19
    Visual Search for Emotional Faces in Children.Allison M. Waters & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (7):1306-1326.
    The ability to rapidly detect facial expressions of anger and threat over other salient expressions has adaptive value across the lifespan. Although studies have demonstrated this threat superiority effect in adults, surprisingly little research has examined the development of this process over the childhood period. In this study, we examined the efficiency of children's facial processing in visual search tasks. In Experiment 1, children (N=49) aged 8 to 11 years were faster and more accurate in detecting angry target faces embedded (...)
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  17.  14
    Are Snakes and Spiders Special? Acquisition of Negative Valence and Modified Attentional Processing by Non-Fear-Relevant Animal Stimuli.Helena M. Purkis & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (3):430-452.
  18.  18
    Emotional Responding in NSSI: Examinations of Appraisals of Positive and Negative Emotional Stimuli, with and Without Acute Stress.Ruth Tatnell, Penelope Hasking, Ottmar V. Lipp, Mark Boyes & Jessica Dawkins - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (6):1304-1316.
    ABSTRACTNon-suicidal self-injury is commonly used by young adults to regulate emotional responses. Yet, experimental examination of how people who self-injure appraise and respond to emotional stimuli is limited. We examined appraisals of, and responses to, emotive images in young adults who did and did not self-injure, and assessed whether these were impacted by exposure to a stressor. Study 1 examined whether participants differed in their appraisals of emotional images. Study 2 assessed whether appraisals of images changed after exposure to the (...)
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  19.  17
    Is the Devil in the Detail? Evidence for S-S Learning After Unconditional Stimulus Revaluation in Human Evaluative Conditioning Under a Broader Set of Experimental Conditions.Hannah Jensen-Fielding, Camilla C. Luck & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (6):1275-1290.
    ABSTRACTWhether valence change during evaluative conditioning is mediated by a link between the conditional stimulus and the unconditional stimulus or between the CS and the unconditional response is a matter of continued debate. Changing the valence of the US after conditioning, known as US revaluation, can be used to dissociate these accounts. Changes in CS valence after US revaluation provide evidence for S-S learning but if CS valence does not change, evidence for S-R learning is found. Support for S-S learning (...)
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  20.  17
    Verbal Instructions Targeting Valence Alter Negative Conditional Stimulus Evaluations.Camilla C. Luck & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):61-80.
    Negative conditional stimulus valence acquired during fear conditioning may enhance fear relapse and is difficult to remove as it extinguishes slowly and does not respond to the instruction that unconditional stimulus presentations will cease. We examined whether instructions targeting CS valence would be more effective. In Experiment 1, an image of one person was paired with an aversive US, while another was presented alone. After acquisition, participants were given positive information about the CS+ poser and negative information about the CS− (...)
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  21.  8
    “It's a Bit More Complicated Than That”: A Broader Perspective on Determinants of Obesity.Barbara Mullan, Nikos Ntoumanis, Cecilie Thøgersen-Ntoumani & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  22.  12
    Visual Search for Emotional Expressions: Effect of Stimulus Set on Anger and Happiness Superiority.Ruth A. Savage, Stefanie I. Becker & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (4).