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  1.  27
    Challenging the Moral Status of Blood Donation.Paul C. Snelling - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (4):340-365.
    The World Health Organisation encourages that blood donation becomes voluntary and unremunerated, a system already operated in the UK. Drawing on public documents and videos, this paper argues that blood donation is regarded and presented as altruistic and supererogatory. In advertisements, donation is presented as something undertaken for the benefit of others, a matter attracting considerable gratitude from recipients and the collecting organisation. It is argued that regarding blood donation as an act of supererogation is wrongheaded, and an alternative account (...)
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  2.  18
    Can the Revised UK Code Direct Practice?Paul C. Snelling - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (4):392-407.
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  3.  31
    Saying Something Interesting About Responsibility for Health.Paul C. Snelling - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (3):161-178.
    The concept of responsibility for health is a significant feature of health discourse and public health policy, but application of the concept is poorly understood. This paper offers an analysis of the concept in two ways. Following an examination of the use of the word ‘responsibility’ in the nursing and wider health literature using three examples, the concept of ‘responsibility for health’ as fulfilling a social function is discussed with reference to policy documents from the UK. The philosophical literature on (...)
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  4.  10
    The Metaethics of Nursing Codes of Ethics and Conduct.Paul C. Snelling - 2016 - Nursing Philosophy 17 (4):229-249.
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  5.  15
    What's Wrong with Tombstoning and What Does This Tell Us About Responsibility for Health?Paul C. Snelling - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):144-157.
    Using tombstoning (jumping from a height into water) as an example, this article claims that public health policies and health promotion tend to assess the moral status of activities following a version of health maximizing rule utilitarianism, but this does not represent common moral experience, not least because it fails to take into account the enjoyment that various health effecting habits brings and the contribution that this makes to a good life, variously defined. It is proposed that the moral status (...)
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  6.  27
    Ethical and Professional Concerns in Research Utilisation: Intentional Rounding in the United Kingdom.Paul C. Snelling - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (7):0969733013478306.
    Intentional rounding, a process involving the performance of regular checks on all patients following a standardised protocol, is being introduced widely in the United Kingdom. The process has been promoted by the Prime Minister and publicised by the Chief Nursing Officer at the Department of Health as well as by influential think tanks and individual National Health Service organisations. An evidence base is offered in justification. This article subjects the evidence base to critical scrutiny concluding that it consists of poor (...)
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  7.  21
    Who Can Blame Who for What and How in Responsibility for Health?Paul C. Snelling - 2015 - Nursing Philosophy 16 (1):3-18.
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  8.  15
    The Subversion of Mill and the Ultimate Aim of Nursing.Paul C. Snelling - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (1):e12201.
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