8 found
Order:
  1.  41
    Challenging the Moral Status of Blood Donation.Paul C. Snelling - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (4):340-365.
    The World Health Organisation encourages that blood donation becomes voluntary and unremunerated, a system already operated in the UK. Drawing on public documents and videos, this paper argues that blood donation is regarded and presented as altruistic and supererogatory. In advertisements, donation is presented as something undertaken for the benefit of others, a matter attracting considerable gratitude from recipients and the collecting organisation. It is argued that regarding blood donation as an act of supererogation is wrongheaded, and an alternative account (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  2.  30
    Can the revised UK code direct practice?Paul C. Snelling - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (4):392-407.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3.  46
    Saying something interesting about responsibility for health.Paul C. Snelling - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (3):161-178.
    The concept of responsibility for health is a significant feature of health discourse and public health policy, but application of the concept is poorly understood. This paper offers an analysis of the concept in two ways. Following an examination of the use of the word ‘responsibility’ in the nursing and wider health literature using three examples, the concept of ‘responsibility for health’ as fulfilling a social function is discussed with reference to policy documents from the UK. The philosophical literature on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4.  31
    What's Wrong with Tombstoning and What Does This Tell Us About Responsibility for Health?Paul C. Snelling - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):144-157.
    Using tombstoning (jumping from a height into water) as an example, this article claims that public health policies and health promotion tend to assess the moral status of activities following a version of health maximizing rule utilitarianism, but this does not represent common moral experience, not least because it fails to take into account the enjoyment that various health effecting habits brings and the contribution that this makes to a good life, variously defined. It is proposed that the moral status (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5.  26
    The metaethics of nursing codes of ethics and conduct.Paul C. Snelling - 2016 - Nursing Philosophy 17 (4):229-249.
    Nursing codes of ethics and conduct are features of professional practice across the world, and in the UK, the regulator has recently consulted on and published a new code. Initially part of a professionalising agenda, nursing codes have recently come to represent a managerialist and disciplinary agenda and nursing can no longer be regarded as a self‐regulating profession. This paper argues that codes of ethics and codes of conduct are significantly different in form and function similar to the difference between (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  35
    Ethical and professional concerns in research utilisation: Intentional rounding in the United Kingdom.Paul C. Snelling - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (7):0969733013478306.
    Intentional rounding, a process involving the performance of regular checks on all patients following a standardised protocol, is being introduced widely in the United Kingdom. The process has been promoted by the Prime Minister and publicised by the Chief Nursing Officer at the Department of Health as well as by influential think tanks and individual National Health Service organisations. An evidence base is offered in justification. This article subjects the evidence base to critical scrutiny concluding that it consists of poor (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  26
    Who can blame who for what and how in responsibility for health?Paul C. Snelling - 2015 - Nursing Philosophy 16 (1):3-18.
    This paper starts by introducing a tripartite conception of responsibility for health consisting of a moral agent having moral responsibilities and being held responsible, that is blamed, for failing to meet them and proceeds to a brief discussion of the nature of the blame, noting difficulties in agency and obligation when the concept is applied to health‐threatening behaviours. Insights about the obligations that we hold people to and the extent of their moral agency are revealed by interrogating our blaming behavior, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  27
    The subversion of Mill and the ultimate aim of nursing.Paul C. Snelling - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (1):e12201.
    This is lightly edited and referenced version of a presentation given at the 20th International Philosophy of Nursing conference in Quebec on 23rd August 2016. Philosophical texts are not given the same prominence in nurse education as their more valued younger sibling, primary research evidence, but they can influence practice through guidelines, codes and espoused values. John Stuart Mill’s harm principle, found in On Liberty, is not a universal law, and only a thoroughgoing libertarian would defend it as such, though (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation