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  1. Medical and Midwifery Students’ Views on the Use of Conscientious Objection in Abortion Care, Following Legal Reform in Chile: A Cross-Sectional Study.M. Antonia Biggs, Lidia Casas, Alejandra Ramm, C. Finley Baba & Sara P. Correa - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1).
    BackgroundIn August 2017, Chile lifted its complete ban on abortion by permitting abortion in three limited circumstances: 1) to save a woman’s life, 2) lethal fetal anomaly, and 3) rape. The new law allows regulated use of conscientious objection in abortion care, including allowing institutions to register as objectors. This study assesses medical and midwifery students’ support for CO, following legal reform.MethodsFrom October 2017 to May 2018, we surveyed medical and midwifery students from seven universities located in Santiago, Chile. Universities (...)
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  2. Knowledge and Attitudes of Physicians Toward Research Ethics and Scientific Misconduct in Lebanon.Bilal Azakir, Hassan Mobarak, Sami Al Najjar, Azza Abou El Naga & Najlaa Mashaal - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1).
    BackgroundDespite the implementation of codes and declarations of medical research ethics, unethical behavior is still reported among researchers. Most of the medical faculties have included topics related to medical research ethics and developed ethical committees; yet, in some cases, unethical behaviors are still observed, and many obstacles are still conferring to applying these guidelines.MethodsThis cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted by interviewing randomly selected 331 Lebanese physicians across Lebanon, to assess their awareness, knowledge and attitudes on practice regarding international and national (...)
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  3. What Passive Euthanasia Is.Iain Brassington - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1).
    BackgroundEuthanasia can be thought of as being either active or passive; but the precise definition of “passive euthanasia” is not always clear. Though all passive euthanasia involves the withholding of life-sustaining treatment, there would appear to be some disagreement about whether all such withholding should be seen as passive euthanasia.Main textAt the core of the disagreement is the question of the importance of an intention to bring about death: must one intend to bring about the death of the patient in (...)
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  4. Ethical Issues and Practical Barriers in Internet-Based Suicide Prevention Research: A Review and Investigator Survey.Eleanor Bailey, Charlotte Mühlmann, Simon Rice, Maja Nedeljkovic, Mario Alvarez-Jimenez, Lasse Sander, Alison L. Calear, Philip J. Batterham & Jo Robinson - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1).
    BackgroundPeople who are at elevated risk of suicide stand to benefit from internet-based interventions; however, research in this area is likely impacted by a range of ethical and practical challenges. The aim of this study was to examine the ethical issues and practical barriers associated with clinical studies of internet-based interventions for suicide prevention.MethodThis was a mixed-methods study involving two phases. First, a systematic search was conducted to identify studies evaluating internet-based interventions for people at risk of suicide, and information (...)
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  5. Too Much Safety? Safeguards and Equal Access in the Context of Voluntary Assisted Dying Legislation.Rosalind McDougall & Bridget Pratt - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundIn June 2019, the Australian state of Victoria joined the growing number of jurisdictions around the world to have legalised some form of voluntary assisted dying. A discourse of safety was prominent during the implementation of the Victorian legislation.Main textIn this paper, we analyse the ethical relationship between legislative “safeguards” and equal access. Drawing primarily on Ruger’s model of equal access to health care services, we analyse the Victorian approach to voluntary assisted dying in terms of four dimensions: horizontal equity, (...)
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  6. How Do 66 European Institutional Review Boards Approve One Protocol for an International Prospective Observational Study on Traumatic Brain Injury? Experiences From the CENTER-TBI Study.Marjolein Timmers, Jeroen T. J. M. van Dijck, Roel P. J. van Wijk, Valerie Legrand, Ernest van Veen, Andrew I. R. Maas, David K. Menon, Giuseppe Citerio, Nino Stocchetti & Erwin J. O. Kompanje - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundThe European Union aims to optimize patient protection and efficiency of health-care research by harmonizing procedures across Member States. Nonetheless, further improvements are required to increase multicenter research efficiency. We investigated IRB procedures in a large prospective European multicenter study on traumatic brain injury, aiming to inform and stimulate initiatives to improve efficiency.MethodsWe reviewed relevant documents regarding IRB submission and IRB approval from European neurotrauma centers participating in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury. Documents included detailed (...)
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  7. Ethical Challenges Regarding the Use of Stem Cells: Interviews with Researchers From Saudi Arabia.Ghiath Alahmad, Sarah Aljohani & Muath Fahmi Najjar - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundWith the huge number of patients who suffer from chronic and incurable diseases, medical scientists continue to search for new curative methods for patients in dire need of treatment. Interest in stem cells is growing, generating high expectations in terms of the possible benefits that could be derived from stem cell research and therapy. However, regardless of the hope of stem cells changing and improving lives, there are many ethical, religious, and political challenges and controversies that affect the research, and (...)
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  8. Partnering with Patients in Healthcare Research: A Scoping Review of Ethical Issues, Challenges, and Recommendations for Practice.Joé T. Martineau, Asma Minyaoui & Antoine Boivin - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-20.
    BackgroundPartnering with patients in healthcare research now benefits from a strong rationale and is encouraged by funding agencies and research institutions. However, this new approach raises ethical issues for patients, researchers, research professionals and administrators. The main objective of this review is to map the literature related to the ethical issues associated with patient partnership in healthcare research, as well as the recommendations to address them. Our global aim is to help researchers, patients, research institutions and research ethics boards reflecting (...)
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  9. Exploring the Conceptualisation and Study of Freebirthing as a Historical and Social Phenomenon: A Meta-Narrative Review of Diverse Research Traditions.Gemma McKenzie, Glenn Robert & Elsa Montgomery - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011786.
    Freebirthing is a clandestine practice whereby women intentionally give birth without healthcare professionals present in countries where there are medical facilities available to assist them. Women who make this decision are frequently subjected to stigma and condemnation, yet research on the phenomenon suggests that women’s motivations are often complex. The aim of this review was to explore how freebirth has been conceptualised over time in the English-language academic and grey literature. The meta-narrative methodology employed enables a phenomenon to be understood (...)
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  10. Presentation of the Clothed Self on the Hospital Ward: An Ethnographic Account of Perceptual Attention and Implications for the Personhood of People Living with Dementia.Paula Boddington, Katie Featherstone & Andy Northcott - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011757.
    This study contributes to our understanding of the ‘medical gaze’ and its impact on the ways in which people living with dementia experience care during a hospital admission. Visual perception has a powerful effect on our emotional and moral reactions to others. One aspect of how we perceive and respond to others is through clothing, which relates strongly to class and social position. Our focus is on exploring the ways in which patient clothing may affect the perceptions and response of (...)
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  11. March Editorial.Brandy Schillace - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):1-1.
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  12. ‘Master My Demons’: Art Therapy Montage Paintings by Active-Duty Military Service Members with Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress.Marygrace Berberian, Melissa S. Walker & Girija Kaimal - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):353-360.
    This study involved a thematic analysis of montage paintings and of related clinical records of 240 active-duty military service members collected during their art therapy treatment for traumatic brain injury and underlying psychological health concerns, including post-traumatic stress, at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Congruent with other research findings, the qualitative analyses of this study suggest that the group art therapy experiences fostered improvement in interpersonal relatedness, hopefulness and gratification for (...)
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  13. Hearing and the Medical Humanities: The Human Auditory Experience.Bonnie Millar - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):406-407.
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  14. ‘The World is Full of Magic Things, Patiently Waiting for Our Senses to Grow Sharper’ (WB Yeats): Enhancing Resilience Among Deaf Young People in South Africa Through Photography and Filmmaking.Alys Young, Lorenzo Ferrarini, Andrew Irving, Claudine Storbeck, Robyn Swannack, Alexandra Tomkins & Shirley Wilson - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):416-427.
    This article concerns deaf children and young people living in South Africa who are South African Sign Language users and who participated in an interdisciplinary research project using the medium of teaching film and photography with the goal of enhancing resilience. Specifically, this paper explores three questions that emerged from the deaf young people’s experience and involvement with the project: What is disclosed about deaf young people’s worldmaking through the filmic and photographic modality? What specific impacts do deaf young people’s (...)
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  15. Soldiering On: A Survey on the Lived Experience of Tinnitus in Aged Military Veterans in the UK.Georgina Burns-O'Connell, David Stockdale & Derek James Hoare - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):408-415.
    Tinnitus has long been interrogated as a medical conundrum, with little discourse between medicine and other disciplines. It involves the perception of sound in the ears or head without any external sound source, most likely a natural consequence of some form of hearing loss. For many people, tinnitus is bothersome and associated with various problems such as insomnia, difficulty concentrating and impaired listening ability. Nevertheless, with little attention from humanities or the social sciences, our understanding of the wider perspectives and (...)
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  16. Ferments and the AIDS Virus: Interspecies Counter-Conduct in the History of AIDS.Justin Abraham Linds - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):435-442.
    In the first three decades after AIDS started infecting people in the USA and Canada, before, during and after the emergence of anti-retroviral therapies, numerous “alternative and holistic treatments” for AIDS were debated, tested, circulated, written about and taught. This paper, taking a narrow focus, examines documents that reveal how some people with AIDS developed a logic of care predicated on intimate interactions with microscopic lifeforms—the AIDS virus and the bacteria involved in fermentation, in particular. Focusing on the writings of (...)
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  17. Health at the Writing Desk of John Ruskin: A Study of Handwriting and Illness.Deborah E. Thorpe, Jane E. Alty & Peter A. Kempster - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):31-45.
    Though John Ruskin is remembered principally for his work as a theorist, art critic and historian of visual culture, he wrote exhaustively about his health in his correspondence and diaries. Ruskin was prone to recurring depressive and hypochondriacal feelings in his youth and adulthood. In 1871, at the age of 52 years, he developed an illness with relapsing psychiatric and neurological features. He had a series of attacks of brain disturbance, and a deterioration of his mental faculties affected his writing (...)
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  18. Estranged Relations: Coercion and Care in Narratives of Supported Decision-Making in Mental Healthcare.Meredith Stone, Renata Kokanovic, Felicity Callard & Alex F. Broom - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):62-72.
    Supported decision-making has become popular among policymakers and mental health advocates as a means of reducing coercion in mental healthcare. Nevertheless, users of psychiatric services often seem equivocal about the value of supported decision-making initiatives. In this paper we explore why such initiatives might be rejected or ignored by the would-be beneficiaries, and we reflect on broader implications for care and coercion. We take a critical medical humanities approach, particularly through the lens of entanglement. We analyse the narratives of 29 (...)
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  19. Lifeworld Interpretation of Tinnitus.Helen Pryce & Rachel Shaw - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):428-433.
    Lifeworld-led care provides a route through which research and practice can navigate the ‘biopsychosocial’ allowing us to overcome the shortfalls of the medical model and enabling us to prioritise humanity in the care of people living with tinnitus. In this article, we sought to explore qualitative descriptions of life with tinnitus. We aimed to address the question ‘what it is like to live with tinnitus?’ In doing so we examined qualitative studies and provide suggestions about key themes that seem consistent. (...)
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  20. Beyond Messiaen’s Birds: The Post-Verbal World of Dementia.Stuart Wood - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):73-83.
    This paper investigates the use of verbatim musical transcription as a research method in dementia care. It reports on an art-based ethnographic study ) in which verbatim transcription was applied to everyday interactions in dementia care, making use of musical—instead of verbal—notation. Starting from the notion that medical and healthcare settings can be sites of ‘found performance’, the paper reviews literature relating to artistic methodologies within medical humanities, music, ethnography and dementia care. From this review, it proposes a research design (...)
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  21. Corporate Medical Cultures: MD Anderson as a Case Study in American Corporate Medical Values.John Mulligan & Bilal Rehman - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):84-92.
    This paper contributes to the evolving body of literature diagnosing the ‘business-like’ transformation of American medicine by historicising and recuperating the concepts of medical leadership and the corporation. In an analysis of the evolving uses of ‘leadership’ in medical literature, we argue that the term’s appeal derives from its ability to productively articulate the inevitable conflicts that arise between competing values in corporations, and so should be understood as a response to the neoliberal corporation’s false resolutions of conflict according to (...)
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  22. Ethics in Cross-Cultural Encounters: A Medical Concern?Arild Kjell Aambø - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):22-30.
    Modern medicine’s investment in the disembodied, objective ‘science’ of biomedicine, where patients are transformed from suffering subjects to objects of investigation, calls for heightened ethical awareness. Around the world, ethical codes of conduct emphasise beneficence and non-maleficence. Lately, we have also seen a quest for autonomy and equitable healthcare for diverse populations. However, these tenets alone do not effectively address the problems which regularly occur in transcultural consultations. By developing a ’space for reflection' based on selected writings of the moral (...)
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  23. Prosthesis and the Engineered Imagination: Reading Augmentation and Disability Across Cultural Theory, Representation and Product Design.Raymond Holt & Stuart Murray - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):55-61.
    This article argues for the value of considering the interaction of literary/cultural studies, disability studies and engineering/design studies in the ongoing development of a critical medical humanities research frame. With a specific focus on prosthesis, but also considerations of embodiment, technology and augmentation as concepts in both cultural/disability theory and engineering/design, we note how the shifting and plastic ideas of ‘the prosthetic’ as used within cultural studies have never been in conversation with scholars who work on prostheses in engineering design (...)
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  24. How Sociophenomenology of the Body Problematises the ‘Problem-Oriented Approach’ to Growth Hormone Treatment.Maria Cristina Murano, Jenny Slatman & Kristin Zeiler - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):2-11.
    This article examines how people who are shorter than average make sense of their lived experience of embodiment. It offers a sociophenomenological analysis of 10 semistructured interviews conducted in the Netherlands, focusing on if, how, and why height matters to them. It draws theoretically on phenomenological discussions of lived and objective space, intercorporeality and norms about bodies. The analysis shows that height as a lived phenomenon is active engagement in space, coshapes habituated ways of behaving and is shaped by gendered (...)
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  25. Using Graphic Illustrations to Uncover How a Community of Practice Can Influence the Delivery of Compassionate Healthcare.Trisha Parsons, Deborah Tregunno, Mala Joneja, Nancy Dalgarno & Leslie Flynn - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):381-387.
    Our modern-day frenetic healthcare culture has progressed to a state where healthcare professionals tend to detach themselves from the emotions of their patients/clients, rather than embed compassion into their daily practice. The AMS Phoenix Project: A Call to Caring was implemented with the goal to instil and sustain empathy and compassion in environments where clinicians learn and work. The purpose of this study is to report on how an interprofessional community of practice of healthcare educators can contribute to a cultural (...)
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  26. Graphic Illustration of Impairment: Science Fiction, Transmetropolitan and the Social Model of Disability.Richard Gibson - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):12-21.
    The following paper examines the cyberpunk transhumanist graphic novel Transmetropolitan through the theoretical lens of disability studies to demonstrate how science fiction, and in particular this series, illustrate and can influence how we think about disability, impairment and difference. While Transmetropolitan is most often read as a scathing political and social satire about abuse of power and the danger of political apathy, the comic series also provides readers with representations of impairment and the source of disability as understood by the (...)
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  27. Exploring Gendered Leadership Stereotypes in a Shared Leadership Model in Healthcare: A Case Study.Saam Idelji-Tehrani & Muna Al-Jawad - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):388-398.
    The existing literature on leadership often describes it within fairly rigid gender roles. Entire models of leadership have been ascribed gendered labels. Shared leadership is, in traditional leadership theory, a feminine model. After observing a National Health Service department enacting a shared leadership model, and using ethnography, grounded theory and comics-based research, we decided to explore the relationship between shared leadership and gender stereotypes. We realised our hope was to see a subversion of traditional stereotypes. Our data showed shared leadership (...)
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  28. Epilepsy, Literature and Linguistics: Spotlighting Subjective Symptoms.Jennifer Sanchez-Davies - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):371-380.
    Literature can offer a wealth of information about epilepsy: from complex narratives to children’s picture books, it can help broaden people’s understanding, show what it is like to live with epilepsy and provide a medium to which people with epilepsy can relate. The latter being particularly important in such cases where seizure experiences are highly subjective, such as those associated with ‘focal seizures’, a common seizure type, which are known for their variable and hard-to-describe symptoms, causing complications with diagnosis as (...)
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  29. Sharing a Vision: Conversation, Global Outreach and Public Engagement.Brandy Schillace - 2018 - Medical Humanities 44 (3):145-145.
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  30. Phenomenology and its Relevance to Medical Humanities: The Example of Hermann Schmitz’s Theory of Feelings as Half-Things.Mathias Wirth - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):346-352.
    One leitmotif that medical humanities shares with phenomenology and most contemporary medical ethics is emphasising the importance of appreciating the patient as a whole person and not merely as an object. With this also comes a focus on marginalisation and invisibility. However, it is not entirely clear what exactly patient-centred care means. What both phenomenology and medical humanities contribute to a ‘more humane health-care encounter’ is offering not only a first-person perspective, but a dialogue between the third-person perspective and evidence-based (...)
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  31. Putting the ‘Me’ in Mechanical: Lessons From the Mechanical Men of Health 1928–1948.Catherine Stones - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):361-370.
    During the interwar years, health exhibitions and pavilions were commonplace in Europe and the USA. Within these exhibitions were a small number of life-sized or oversized mechanical men used to represent physiological processes. Although they received significant press attention at the time, little academic analysis exists to date. These mechanical men, I argue, all provide important insights regarding the way design could be used to heighten the appeal of physiology and crucially, in the formation of a new term—the Accessible Body.First, (...)
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  32. Culturally Shared Metaphors Expand Contemporary Concepts of Resilience and Post-Traumatic Growth: Contrasting an Indigenous Brazilian Community and a Swiss Rural Community.Iara Meili, Eva Heim & Andreas Maercker - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):335-345.
    The metaphorical concepts resilience and post-traumatic growth reflect the contemporary Western understanding of overcoming highly challenging life events. However, it is known that across different cultures, a broad range of metaphorical idioms for describing adaptive responses to severe adversity exists. This study aimed to explore and contrast two distinct cultural groups’ culturally shared metaphors for overcoming severe adversities. Fieldwork was conducted in two rural communities: an indigenous Brazilian community that has experienced severe collective adversity and a mountain village in Switzerland (...)
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  33. Towards a Translational Medical Humanities: Introducing the Cultural Crossings of Care.Eivind Engebretsen, Gina Fraas Henrichsen & John Ødemark - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011751.
    In this introductory essay, we will present a translational medical humanities approach where the humanities are not only an auxiliary to medical science and practice, but also an interdisciplinary space where both medicine and the humanities mutually challenge and inform each other. First, we explore how medicine’s attempt to tackle the nature–culture divide is emblematically expressed in the concept and practice of knowledge translation. Second, we compare and contrast KT as an epistemic ideology and a socio-medical practice, with concepts and (...)
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  34. ‘Between-Time Stories’: Waiting, War and the Temporalities of Care.Laura Salisbury - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011810.
    This article analyses how World War II shifted and contained embodied experiences of waiting in relation to broader ideas of lived time in modernity. The trench warfare of World War I has often been imagined as a limit experience of anxious waiting, but World War II produced compelling accounts of experiences of suspended time in civilian populations exposed to the threat and anticipation of ‘total war’. This article analyses representations of this suspended present drawn from Elizabeth Bowen and Virginia Woolf, (...)
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  35. Eggs, Sugar, Grated Bones: Colour-Based Food Preferences in Autism, Eating Disorders, and Beyond.Mattias Strand - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011811.
    In 1913, eccentric French composer Erik Satie wrote a fragmentary, diary-like essay where he depicted a strikingly rigid diet consisting solely of white foods: eggs, sugar, coconuts, rice, cream cheese, fuchsia juice and so on. Satie’s brief essay has later been used as one of many puzzle pieces in attempts to retrospectively diagnose him with autism spectrum disorder. With Satie’s white meal as a starting point, this paper explores colour-based food preferences and selective eating in clinical and non-clinical populations, with (...)
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  36. Autonomous Decisions by Couples in Reproductive Care.Amal Matar, Anna T. Höglund, Pär Segerdahl & Ulrik Kihlbom - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundPreconception Expanded Carrier Screening is a genetic test offered to a general population or to couples who have no known risk of recessive and X-linked genetic diseases and are interested in becoming parents. A test may screen for carrier status of several autosomal recessive diseases at one go. Such a program has been piloted in the Netherlands and may become a reality in more European countries in the future. The ethical rationale for such tests is that they enhance reproductive autonomy. (...)
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  37. ‘Never Forget’: Fictionalising the Holocaust Survivor with Dementia.Sue Vice - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011782.
    This article asks what the reasons are for the frequent linking of the image of the Holocaust with that of dementia in contemporary discursive and representational practice. In doing so, it analyses some of the numerous 21st-century examples of fiction, drama and film in which the figure of a Holocaust survivor living with dementia takes centre stage. It explores the contradictory cultural effects that arise from making such a connection, in contexts that include expressions of fear at the spectacle of (...)
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  38. Recognition, Collaboration and Community: Science Fiction Representations of Robot Carers in Robot & Frank, Big Hero 6 and Humans.Yugin Teo - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011744.
    In the 2010s, a small number of science fiction films and television series exploring the theme of the robot carer and how humans respond to them were released. This paper explores three works in this regard: the films Robot & Frank, Big Hero 6 and the television series Humans. Examining these works with some of the ethical issues currently being discussed in the use of robot technology in care work, this paper demonstrates how they align themselves with, but also challenge (...)
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  39. A Critique of Paulo Freire’s Perspective on Human Nature to Inform the Construction of Theoretical Underpinnings for Research.Kate Sanders - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  40. A Palliative Care Approach in Psychiatry: Clinical Implications.Mattias Strand, Manne Sjöstrand & Anna Lindblad - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundTraditionally, palliative care has focused on patients suffering from life-threatening somatic diseases such as cancer or progressive neurological disorders. In contrast, despite the often chronic, severely disabling, and potentially life-threatening nature of psychiatric disorders, there are neither palliative care units nor clinical guidelines on palliative measures for patients in psychiatry.Main textThis paper contributes to the growing literature on a palliative approach in psychiatry and is based on the assumption that a change of perspective from a curative to a palliative approach (...)
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  41. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Tool for Measuring the Attitudes of Patients with Progressive Neurological Diseases to Ethical Aspects of End-of-Life Care.Radka Bužgová & Radka Kozáková - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundKnowing the opinions of patients with Progressive Neurological Diseases and their family members on end-of-life care can help initiate communication and the drawing up of a care plan. The aim of this paper is to describe the creation and psychometric properties of the newly developed APND-EoLC questionnaire.MethodsFollowing focus group discussion, four main areas of interest were identified: patients’ and family members’ attitudes towards end-of-life care, factors influencing decisions about treatment to prolong patients’ life, concerns and fears regarding dying, and opinions (...)
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  42. Perspectives Regarding Privacy in Clinical Research Among Research Professionals From the Arab Region: An Exploratory Qualitative Study.Latifa Adarmouch, Marwan Felaefel, Robert Wachbroit & Henry Silverman - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-16.
    BackgroundProtecting the privacy of research participants is widely recognized as one of the standard ethical requirements for clinical research. It is unknown, however, how research professionals regard concepts of privacy as well as the situations in the research setting that require privacy protections. The aim of this study was to explore the views of research professionals from Arab countries regarding concepts and scope of privacy that occur in clinical research.MethodsWe adopted an exploratory qualitative approach by the use of focus group (...)
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  43. An Interprofessional Cohort Analysis of Student Interest in Medical Ethics Education: A Survey-Based Quantitative Study.Mikalyn T. DeFoor, Yunmi Chung, Julie K. Zadinsky, Jeffrey Dowling & Richard W. Sams - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundThere is continued need for enhanced medical ethics education across the United States. In an effort to guide medical ethics education reform, we report the first interprofessional survey of a cohort of graduate medical, nursing and allied health professional students that examined perceived student need for more formalized medical ethics education and assessed preferences for teaching methods in a graduate level medical ethics curriculum.MethodsIn January 2018, following the successful implementation of a peer-led, grassroots medical ethics curriculum, student leaders under faculty (...)
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  44. Editorial Paper.Jan Dewing - 2020 - Nursing Philosophy 21 (2).
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  45. Getting Into It in the Wrong Way: Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis and the Hermeneutic Circle.Daniel Gyollai - 2020 - Nursing Philosophy 21 (2).
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  46. To Dwell Within: Bridging the Theory–Practice Gap.Mark Zieber & Bernadine Wojtowicz - 2020 - Nursing Philosophy 21 (2).
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  47. Albert Mieczysław Krąpiec’s Theory of the Person for Professional Nursing Practice.Marcin Paweł Ferdynus - 2020 - Nursing Philosophy 21 (2).
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  48. Exploring a Hermeneutic Perspective of Nursing Through Revisiting Nursing Health History.Julie Frechette & Franco A. Carnevale - 2020 - Nursing Philosophy 21 (2).
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  49. Psychiatry, Risk and Vulnerability: The Significance of Robert Castel’s Work for Nursing.Etienne Paradis‐Gagné & Pierre Pariseau‐Legault - 2020 - Nursing Philosophy 21 (2).
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  50. Habermas and the Therapeutic Function of Language.Krzysztof Pezdek, Robert Dobrowolski & Tomasz Michaluk - 2020 - Nursing Philosophy 21 (2).
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