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  1.  22
    How Does Corporeality Inform Theorizing? Revisiting Hannah Arendt and the Banality of Evil.Paulina Segarra & Ajnesh Prasad - 2018 - Human Studies 41 (4):545-563.
    The perplexing relationship between two of the twentieth century’s most important philosophers, Hannah Arendt and Martin Heidegger, has been the subject of much speculation within academic circles. For Arendt, Heidegger was at once, her mentor, her lover, and her friend. In this paper, we juxtapose Arendt’s theory of the banality of evil against her relationship with Heidegger in an effort to consider the question: How does corporeality inform theorizing? In answering this question, we repudiate the conventional reading of the banality (...)
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  2.  12
    The Political Embeddedness of Entrepreneurship in Extreme Contexts: The Case of the West Bank.Farzad H. Alvi, Ajnesh Prasad & Paulina Segarra - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (1):279-292.
    This article underscores the need for entrepreneurship research in extreme contexts to conceptualize the idiosyncrasies of the geopolitical dynamics under which entrepreneurs operate, and to consider the ethical implications emanating thereof. Undertaking such a task will illuminate the contextual challenges that local entrepreneurs must routinely placate, or otherwise navigate, to survive. Drawing on rich qualitative data from the Occupied Palestinian Territory of the West Bank, this paper demonstrates one avenue by which to capture the nuances of an extreme context in (...)
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  3. Tolls, Schools, and Tips: The Reproduction of Social Inequality Through Day-to-Day Practices.Ajnesh Prasad & Paulina Segarra - forthcoming - Business and Society.
    How is social inequality reproduced through day-to-day practices? In this commentary, we use the geographical context of Mexico City to argue that social inequality is maintained by “class work” of elites. Specifically, we discuss how (1) urban planning crystallizes class boundaries, (2) private school education reproduces them, and (3) tipping prevents their disruption.
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