9 found
Order:
  1.  16
    Placebo Treatments, Informed Consent and ‘the Grip of a False Picture’.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):669-672.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  25
    Back to Bundles: Deflating Property Rights, Again.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2014 - Legal Theory 20 (1):1-24.
    Following Wesley Hohfeld's pioneering analyses, which demonstrated that the concept of ownership conflated a variety of distinct legal relations, a deflationary regarding those relations as essentially unconnected held sway for much of the subsequent century. In recent decades, this theory has been thought too diffuse; it seems counterintuitive to insist, for instance, that rights of possession and alienation over a property are associated only contingently. Accordingly, scholars such as James Penner and James Harris have advanced theories that revive the concept (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  71
    Universal Grammar and the Baldwin Effect: A Hypothesis and Some Philosophical Consequences.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (2):201-222.
    Grammar is now widely regarded as a substantially biological phenomenon, yet the problem of language evolution remains a matter of controversy among Linguists, Cognitive Scientists, and Evolutionary Theorists alike. In this paper, I present a new theoretical argument for one particular hypothesis—that a Language Acquisition Device of the sort first posited by Noam Chomsky might have evolved via the so-called Baldwin Effect . Close attention to the workings of that mechanism, I argue, helps to explain a previously mysterious feature of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  4
    Parsing Placebo Treatments: A Response to Barnhill and Miller.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (10):687-689.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  43
    Kind-Making, Objectivity, and Political Neutrality; the Case of Solastalgia.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):209-218.
  6.  7
    Dolphin Natures, Human Virtues: MacIntyre and Ethical Naturalism.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (3):292-297.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7. Dolphin Natures, Human Virtues: Macintyre and Ethical Naturalism.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (3):292-297.
    Can biological facts explain human morality? Aristotelian ‘virtue’ ethics has traditionally assumed so. In recent years Alasdair MacIntyre has reintroduced a form of Aristotle’s ‘metaphysical biology’ into his ethics. He argues that the ethological study of dependence and rationality in other species—dolphins in particular—sheds light on how those same traits in the typical lives of humans give rise to the moral virtues. However, some goal-oriented dolphin behaviour appears both dependent and rational in the precise manner which impresses MacIntyre, yet anything (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Lewis.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2011 - Philosophical Forum 42 (3):328-329.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. So Language. Very Prescribe. Wow.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2019 - Sofia 8 (1):108-123.
    The philosophical dispute about linguistic normativity is one battlefield in a larger war over the nature of language as an object of scientific study. For those influenced by Wittgenstein, language involves following — or failing to follow — public, prescriptive rules; for Chomsky and his followers, language is a property of individual minds and brains, and the grammatical judgements of any mature individual speaker — her competence — cannot be, in any linguistic sense, “wrong”. As I argue here, the recent (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark