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  1.  30
    A Genealogy of Business Ethics: A Nietzschean Perspective.Skip Worden - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):427-456.
    This article approaches the field of business ethics from a Nietzschean vantage point, which means explaining the weakness of the field by means of providing an etiological account of the values esteemed by the decadent business ethicists therein. I argue that such business ethicists have wandered from their immanent philosophical ground to act as scientists, business persons, and preaching-moralists as a way of evading their human self-contradictions. In actuality, this fleeing exacerbates them into a sickness of self-idolatry and selfloathing. I (...)
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  2.  43
    Religion in Strategic Leadership: A Positivistic, Normative/Theological, and Strategic Analysis.Skip Worden - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (3):221-239.
    This paper presents positivistic, normative/theological, and strategic analyses of the application of religion to the practice of strategic leadership in business. It is argued that elements of religion can enrich several components of strategic leadership. Furthermore, it is argued that the question of whether religion ought to be applied involves the more basic question of whether there is a common basis or a meta-framework relating theological and normative analyses. Finally, because the strategic value of religion in strategic leadership involves varying (...)
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  3.  22
    The Role of Integrity as a Mediator in Strategic Leadership: A Recipe for Reputational Capital. [REVIEW]Skip Worden - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):31 - 44.
    In the context of a crisis of confidence in executive leadership in corporate America, this paper examines the role of integrity as a mediator within strategic leadership and its impact on credibility in reputational capital. A tension can occur within strategic leadership between the elements of strategic planning and leadership vision. This tension can destroy the credibility of reputational capital unless strategic leadership is managed effectively. Integrity can be used as the glue providing for credible leadership vision amid a strategic (...)
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  4.  19
    The Role of Religious and Nationalist Ethics in Strategic Leadership: The Case of J. N. Tata. [REVIEW]Skip Worden - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 47 (2):147 - 164.
    This paper examines the role that religious ethics, complemented by a nationalist principle, can play in a sustained exercise of strategic leadership, hypothesizing a positive association with a societal reputation for credibility or integrity. The key to this relation is the constraining effect on strategic or financial pressures, even if there is coherence in the long-term. J. N. Tata, the founder of Tata Industries who lived in British India, was a Parsee priest and an advocate for Indian national self-reliance and (...)
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  5.  46
    Aristotle’s Natural Wealth: The Role of Limitation in Thwarting Misordered Concupiscence. [REVIEW]Skip Worden - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):209 - 219.
    I argue that Aristotle's approach to the proper type of acquisition, use-value, want, and accumulation/storage of wealth is oriented less to excluding commercial activity, such as that of Aristotle's Athens, than to forestalling misordered concupiscence – the taking of an inherendy limited good for the unlimited, or highest, good. That is, his moral aversion to taking a means for an end lies behind his rendering of the sort of wealth that is natural. By stressing the limited nature of natural wealth, (...)
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  6.  10
    Aristotle’s Natural Wealth: The Role of Limitation in Thwarting Misordered Concupiscence.Skip Worden - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):209-219.
    I argue that Aristotle's approach to the proper type of acquisition, use-value, want, and accumulation/storage of wealth is oriented less to excluding commercial activity, such as that of Aristotle's Athens, than to forestalling misordered concupiscence – the taking of an inherendy limited good for the unlimited, or highest, good. That is, his moral aversion to taking a means for an end lies behind his rendering of the sort of wealth that is natural. By stressing the limited nature of natural wealth, (...)
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