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  1. Professional Responsibility: The Role of the Engineer in Society.Steven P. Nichols - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (3):327-337.
    We argue that the practice of engineering does not exist outside the domain of societal interests. That is, the practice of engineering has an inherent (and unavoidable) impact on society. Engineering is based upon that relationship with society (inter alia). An engineer’s conduct (as captured in professional codes of conduct) toward other engineers, toward employers, toward clients, and toward the public is an essential part of the life of a professional engineer, yet the education process and professional societies pay inadequate (...)
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    PRiME: Integrating Professional Responsibility Into the Engineering Curriculum. [REVIEW]Christy Moore, Hillary Hart, D’Arcy Randall & Steven P. Nichols - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):273-289.
    Engineering educators have long discussed the need to teach professional responsibility and the social context of engineering without adding to overcrowded curricula. One difficulty we face is the lack of appropriate teaching materials that can fit into existing courses. The PRiME (Professional Responsibility Modules for Engineering) Project (http://www.engr.utexas.edu/ethics/primeModules.cfm) described in this paper was initiated at the University of Texas, Austin to provide web-based modules that could be integrated into any undergraduate engineering class. Using HPL (How People Learn) theory, PRiME developed (...)
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    An Approach to Integrating “Professional Responsibility” in Engineering Into the Capstone Design Experience.Steven P. Nichols - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):399-412.
    ABET 2000 Criteria encourages development of proficiency in professional responsibility in engineering as part of the undergraduate curriculum. This paper discusses the use of industrially sponsored capstone design projects to encourage active discussion of professional responsibility in engineering that naturally occurs during the engineering design process. The paper also discusses student participation in designing responses and approaches to issues such as engineering ethics. The paper includes specific examples of topics addressed by students and the approaches developed (by students) in addressing (...)
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