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  1.  9
    AHoY Award Presentation to Dr Rodney Syme.Allison Lyn - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:4.
    Rodney Syme, retired medical doctor, urologist and advocate for medically assisted dying for 20 years, has helped scores of people die peacefully - people whose suffering has become unbearable to them. He takes on governments, the law and the medical profession. Most recently he won his challenge of an order by the Medical Board of Australia to prohibit him from doing anything that has the primary purpose of ending a person's life. The case in question was a 71-year-old man dying (...)
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  2.  3
    Growing for Broke: How the Government has Sold Out to Private Interests [Book Review].Alm Margit - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:23.
    Alm, Margit Review of: Growing for broke: How the government has sold out to private interests, by Peter North, Published in 2016 by Tomorrow Press, PO Box 238, Berwick, Vic. 3806 ISBN 978-168418977-9.
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  3.  18
    The Neuron Dance.Rudi Anders - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:16.
    Anders, Rudi They dance in view, they dance in secret. And yet they dance together...
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  4.  9
    Run, Spot, Run: The Ethics of Keeping Pets [Book Review].Bender Robert - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:23.
    Bender, Robert Review of: Run, spot, run: The ethics of keeping pets, by Jessica Pierce, Uni of Chicago Press, 2016, 264 pages.
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  5.  8
    Immigration Detention, Australia's Response to a Humanitarian Problem.Brown Pauline - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:12.
    Brown, Pauline I recently came across an article by Meg Keneally in The Guardian. I can think of no better description of our policies and practices on immigration detention than the following extract: It's a well-worn solution to an intractable human problem involving a large group of inconvenient people - ship them off somewhere, put a wall around them, and try to forget about the whole thing. You could argue that our country was founded as a result of this approach. (...)
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  6.  6
    Child Abuse Royal Commission - a Personal Perspective.Bryce Ian - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:20.
    Bryce, Ian The following are my personal observations based on several visits to public hearings of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. I've also included media reports, and what I've learnt from contacts with interest groups. I recommend others sit in a public hearing for a day, to see the system in action.
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  7.  3
    Darwin the Humanitarian.Colin Groves - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:9.
    Groves, Colin The year was 1825. The 16-year-old Charles Darwin, regarded as a wastrel, interested only in beetle collecting and shooting, was sent by his father to Edinburgh to study medicine. As might have been expected, Charles had many other interests well beyond his course of study. He wrote excitedly to his sisters, 'I am to be taught stuffing by a blackamoor!'.
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  8.  26
    Public Ethics in the Era of Trump.Peter Singer - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:5.
    Singer, Peter As someone who has been involved in contemporary ethics and political philosophy, what public ethics suggests to me is a concept that was put forward by the late twentieth-century American philosopher John Rawls. He wrote a famous book, A Theory of Justice, in which he talked about what he called 'public reason'. His idea is that in a pluralist society that does not have any established religion, when citizens argue about ethical issues they should do so in a (...)
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  9.  5
    Incoming President's Message.Storey Lyndon - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:11.
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  10.  2
    Time to Die: A Critique of Palliative Care.Rodney Syme - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:17.
    Syme, Rodney Palliative care, founded by Cicely Saunders, a devout Christian, has grown from a single London hospice to a world-wide specialty with strong government support. It is one of the most important developments in modern medicine. It aims to provide compassionate and holistic care for the terminally ill. Nevertheless opposition on religious grounds to assisted-dying or hastening of death has been a core principle of palliative care from its origin, and persists today.
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  11.  3
    Images From the Australian Humanist Convention, 7-9 April 2017.Vickers Mal & Ford - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 126:14.
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  12.  9
    Pat-a-Cake: Should Bakers Bake Me a 'Gay' Cake?Wallace Meg - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:16.
    Wallace, Meg A Northern Ireland Court recently held that a baker's refusal to provide a cake with same-sex decoration is discrimination. Here are the reasons why the judgment is right.
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  13.  5
    Bad Science [Book Review].Robert Bender - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:23.
    Bender, Robert Review of: Bad science, by Ben Goldacre, 2008, Harper/Collins 370 pages.
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  14.  27
    What Exactly is the Scientific Method and Why Do so Many People Get It Wrong?Peter Ellerton - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:14.
    Ellerton, Peter So what is the scientific method, and why do so many people, sometimes including those trained in science, get it so wrong? The first thing to understand is that there is no one method in science, no one way of doing things. This is intimately connected with how we reason in general.
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  15.  7
    Reimagining Humanism.Rosslyn Ives - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:1.
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  16.  10
    Vale: Alan Peter McPhate 9 February 1929 - 19 October 2016.Rosslyn Ives - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:13.
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  17.  4
    Sustainable Development, Are We the Lucky Country?Lowe Ian - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:18.
    Lowe, Ian The late Donald Horne was a truly important Australian intellectual. His 1964 book The Lucky Country caused a sensation and was a runaway bestseller. As the cover of the sixth edition published in 2008 says, 'the book was a wake-up call to an unimaginative nation, an indictment of a country mired in mediocrity and manacled to its past'. The title came from the introduction to the book's final chapter. It described Australia as 'a lucky country run mainly by (...)
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  18.  8
    The Best Country in the World?: India, Where the Cow is the Holy Mother.Sangeeta Mall - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:5.
    Mall, Sangeeta The most popular Indian street food is the pani puri. The snack is a combination of solid and liquid, a watery bomb of sweet, sour and tangy flavours, a complete sensory delight, much like Indian society, though 'delight' might not be the right descriptor at times. Freedom of expression, individual rights, civil liberties, equality before law, all the cornerstones of a democracy, have been given to the Indian people by the founding fathers in the form of a robust (...)
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  19.  15
    A Humanist Future is Technoprogressive.Lawson Reagan - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:2.
    Reagan, Lawson This article will argue that a Humanist future is a technoprogressive one. It will first give an overview of the emerging third dimension of 21st century politics, that of biopolitics. It will define the broad differences between the transhumanist and bioconservative movements. Then it will turn to the two main ideologically competing strands of the transhumanist movement: that of right wing 'Libertarian Transhumanism' and left wing 'Technoprogressivism'.
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  20.  1
    'Humanist Community Workers': A Project for Australian Humanism.Storey Lyndon - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:9.
    Storey, Lyndon Humanism is an approach to life in its own right: it is not simply the rejection of religion. Nor is it just the continuing on of religiously inspired values without an accompanying belief in God. Humanism relies on exploring human potential, including our potential for such things as compassion, love, and to find a path to a fulfilling and meaningful life. Humanism is an essentially social set of beliefs with its emphasis on common humanity and it can inspire (...)
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  21.  5
    My Year Without Meat [Book Review].Stuart Jennie - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:21.
    Stuart, Jennie Review of: My year without meat, by Richard Cornish, Melbourne University Press 2016, 185 pp.
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  22.  7
    Religion's Dying Swan Act: Secularism is Banishing It From the Public Square.Max Wallace - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:7.
    Wallace, Max It is an often-heard claim, expressed in newspaper articles, academia, and on-line public forums, that religion is being banished from the public square.
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  23.  6
    Matter and What Matters: Some Science for the Religious and Some Religion for Scientists [Book Review].Ken Wright - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:22.
    Wright, Ken Review of: Matter and what matters: Some science for the religious and some religion for scientists, Lionel Sharman, Steele Roberts, Wellington, 2013, 116 pp., NZD 24.99.
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