13 found

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  1. The Books of Tho. Hobbes.Auger Peter - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (2):236-253.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 236 - 253 There are four books that have been advertised in sales catalogues as possessing the inscription ‘Tho. Hobbes’ and having once been owned by Thomas Hobbes. But how confident can we be that they belonged to the famous philosopher? This research note gathers evidence for assessing whether or not this quartet of books were once in the possession of Hobbes of Malmesbury, with particular attention given to a previously undiscussed edition of (...)
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  2.  2
    Duty Without Obligation.S. A. Lloyd - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (2):202-221.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 202 - 221 There is ongoing scholarly debate over the role that Hobbes’s laws of nature play in grounding the moral requirement that subjects obey the government under which they live. This essay demonstrates how the laws of nature, when understood as natural duties, may directly ground a moral duty to obey one’s sovereign without positing that subjects have undertaken any covenant of subjection. Such a grounding avoids the problems that attend accounts that (...)
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  3. Conditioned to Believe: Hobbes on Religion, Education, and Social Context.MacMillan Alissa - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (2):156-177.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 156 - 177 Using the example of ghosts and religion, this paper argues for the importance of social context and background operative in Hobbes’s account of social life and, in particular, the role of environment, education, and language in explaining much of what we think we know, and much of what we believe. The paper looks to aspects of Hobbes’s epistemology and his account of belief, to make the case that he recognizes how (...)
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  4. I Professed to Write Not All to All.Eva Helene Odzuck - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (2):123-155.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 123 - 155 While there are old questions in research on Hobbes regarding which audience he addressed in each of his different works – e.g. there are speculations that _De Cive_ is addressed to scientists and _Leviathan_ to the English people – another question has rarely been discussed and only recently reconsidered: Might Hobbes have addressed different audiences also _within_ one and the same text, and if so, might he have intended to communicate (...)
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  5.  1
    That Giant Monster Call’D a Multitude.Tootalian Jacob - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (2):223-235.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 223 - 235 Scholarship on _Leviathan_ has not fully explored the distinctive pattern of language that Hobbes used to invoke the central conceit of the treatise—“that great LEVIATHAN called a COMMONWEALTH.” This note highlights an earlier instance of that rare linguistic construction, one that presented a similar image of political monstrosity several years before Hobbes’s metaphor was published. _Verses in Honour of the Reverend and Learned Judge of the Law, Judge Jenkin_ celebrated the (...)
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  6.  1
    The Problem of the Unity of the Representative Assembly in Hobbes’s Leviathan.Douglas C. Wadle - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (2):178-201.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 178 - 201 In _Leviathan_, Hobbes embraces three seemingly inconsistent claims: the unity of a multitude is secured only by the unity of its representer, assemblies can represent other multitudes, and assemblies are, or are constituted by, multitudes. Together these claims require that a representative assembly, itself, be represented. If that representer is another assembly, it too will need a unifying representer, and so on. To stop a regress, we will need an already (...)
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  7.  30
    Natural Philosophy, Deduction, and Geometry in the Hobbes-Boyle Debate.Marcus P. Adams - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):83-107.
    This paper examines Hobbes’s criticisms of Robert Boyle’s air-pump experiments in light of Hobbes’s account in _De Corpore_ and _De Homine_ of the relationship of natural philosophy to geometry. I argue that Hobbes’s criticisms rely upon his understanding of what counts as “true physics.” Instead of seeing Hobbes as defending natural philosophy as “a causal enterprise … [that] as such, secured total and irrevocable assent,” 1 I argue that, in his disagreement with Boyle, Hobbes relied upon his understanding of natural (...)
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  8.  4
    An Early European Critic of Hobbes’s De Corpore.Stephen Clucas - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):4-27.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 4 - 27 The _Animadversiones in Elementorum Philosophiae_ by a little known Flemish scholar G. Moranus, published in Brussels in 1655 was an early European response to Hobbes’s _De Corpore_. Although it is has been referred to by various Hobbes scholars, such as Noel Malcolm, Doug Jesseph, and Alexander Bird it has been little studied. Previous scholarship has tended to focus on the mathematical criticisms of André Tacquet which Moranus included in the form (...)
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  9.  2
    De Corpore.Douglas Jesseph - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):1-3.
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  10.  9
    Hobbes on the Ratios of Motions and Magnitudes.Douglas Jesseph - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):58-82.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 58 - 82 Hobbes intended and expected _De Corpore_ to secure his place among the foremost mathematicians of his era. This is evident from the content of Part III of the work, which contains putative solutions to the most eagerly sought mathematical results of the seventeenth century. It is well known that Hobbes failed abysmally in his attempts to solve problems of this sort, but it is not generally understood that the mathematics of (...)
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  11.  1
    Reading Between the Lines- Leo Strauss and the History of Early Modern Philosophy_, _edited by Winfried Schroeder.Paipais Vassilios - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):116-120.
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  12.  6
    Hobbes’s De Corpore on Modalities and Its Contemporary Critiques.Martine Pécharman - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):28-57.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 28 - 57 Hobbes considered as unambiguous and unproblematic his demonstration in _De Corpore_ that every effect past, present or future is necessary, since it always requires a sufficient cause that cannot be sufficient without being necessary, so that nothing is possible which will not be actual at some time. Now, this approach to necessity and possibility was received by his contemporary readers as missing its aim. Two immediate criticisms of _De Corpore_ by (...)
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  13.  1
    Mortal Gods: Science, Politics, and the Humanist Ambitions of Thomas Hobbes_, _Written by Ted H. Miller.Timothy Raylor - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):109-115.
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