Hobbes Studies

ISSN: 0921-5891

16 found

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  1.  27
    The Intersections of Knowledge: Hobbes, Mersenne, Descartes.Roger Ariew - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):197-212.
    Gregorio Baldin’s book, La croisée des savoirs, concerns the intellectual relations among Hobbes, Mersenne, and Descartes. The study is limited to the time between 1634 and 1648, starting when Hobbes first met Mersenne in Paris and ending when Mersenne died. It covers three main topics. Part i is devoted to the relations maintained by Hobbes with the circle of Mersenne during 1634–1636, which Baldin thinks are essential for the development of Hobbes’ scientific thought. Part ii develops the theme of the (...)
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  2.  10
    A Note from the Editor.Deborah Baumgold - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):123-124.
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  3.  13
    Hobbes and the Democratic Imaginary, written by Holman, Christopher.Cesare Cuttica - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):244-251.
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  4.  7
    Plague and the Leviathan.Daniel J. Kapust - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):221-233.
    Building on a number of recent studies that have turned to Hobbes in light of covid-19, I explore the context of Hobbes’ own encounters with plague while at Oxford, along with efforts to mitigate plague by the regime of James I. I then explore what role his encounters with plague may have played as he wrote his philosophical masterpiece, Leviathan.
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  5.  7
    A Hobbesian Method for Establishing the Absurdity of Injustice Without Reliance on Hobbes’s Temporal Arguments.S. A. Lloyd - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):141-155.
    The paper investigates Hobbes’s arguments that injustice is a kind of absurdity involving a “contradiction properly so called,” concluding that although those arguments are undermined by their reliance on a mistaken temporality assumption, Hobbes’s philosophy provides other means for establishing his desired conclusion.
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  6.  25
    Current Scholarship and Future Directions in Hobbes Studies.S. A. Lloyd - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):213-220.
    Today the study of Hobbes is both reputable and flourishing, to judge by the numbers in recent years of publications, submissions, conferences, workshops, and sessions at professional meetings devoted to Hobbes, along with growing interest from scholars in China and Latin America. I recently conducted a survey of colleagues working on Hobbes; a non-scientific survey, it included scholars working in a variety of departments. This research note reports the views of more than three dozen respondents, who answered three questions: (1) (...)
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  7.  13
    Civilization and Its Others: American Imaginaries, State of Nature, and Civility in Hobbes.Stephanie B. Martens - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):175-196.
    Critical approaches to the canon of Western political and legal thought from the point of view of race or gender have developed in recent years, as have studies highlighting the connections between supposedly universalist philosophies and their role in sustaining or legitimizing imperial and colonial conquests. On social contract theory in particular, seminal works include Charles Mills’ The Racial Contract and Carole Pateman’s The Sexual Contract. The importance of this type of work cannot be understated, and Mills is right to (...)
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  8.  7
    Dictionnaire des philosophes français du XVIIe siècle: Acteurs et réseaux du savoir, written by Foisneau, Luc, et al.José Médina - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):252-257.
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  9.  20
    Hobbes on the Cause of Action: How to Rethink Practical Reasoning.Martine Pécharman - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):125-140.
    In the free-will discussion between Hobbes and Bramhall, Hobbes’s principle that actions are necessary is not immediately action-theoretic. The fundamental theoretical context of Hobbes’s explanation of action lies in an understanding of causation more generally. However, Hobbes’s action theory is not simply modeled after the account of cause and effect in his First Philosophy. It introduces a temporal qualification which ranks necessitarianism higher than First Philosophy does: not only a voluntary action, but also the determinate moment when the mental act (...)
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  10.  9
    Thomas Hobbes’ Invisible Things.Allan Gabriel Cardoso dos Santos - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):156-174.
    Hobbes argues that among the reasons for the Catholic Church’s power is the difficulty for ignorant people to understand the causes of natural phenomena. They take the motion of invisible bodies for the intervention of incorporeal agents. For Hobbes, the Church tries to perpetuate this profitable misunderstanding by spreading Scholastic doctrines supporting this idea in the sermons of all the parishes of the Christian world. Existing literature, thus far, focused almost exclusively on Hobbes’ negative claim concerning incorporeal substances, i.e., that (...)
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  11.  12
    The Long Arc of Legality: Hobbes, Kelsen, Hart, written by Dyzenhaus, David.Rosemarie Wagner - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (2):235-243.
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  12.  21
    Thomas Hobbes in Racist Context.Adrian Blau - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (1):9-27.
    Is it anachronistic to talk about racism in Hobbes? After all, racism is usually seen as biological: the disliked group must have innate characteristics which are inherited biologically. This is mostly said to be a modern idea. Yet biological racism can be found in medieval and early modern times, as with the Spanish doctrine of limpieza de sangre (cleanliness/purity of blood). Racism, including biological racism, was much more common in Hobbes’s England than we might think, including in texts he may (...)
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  13.  36
    Hobbes Among the Savages: Politics, War, and Enmity in the So-called State of Nature.Allan M. Hillani - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (1):97-121.
    In this article I argue that Thomas Hobbes’s theory of the “state of nature” should be understood as describing a thoroughly political situation. Hobbes’s exemplification of the state of nature by resorting to the “savages” of America should be taken in its ultimately paradoxical character, one that puts in question the stark opposition between a prepolitical natural state and the properly political state resulting from the “social contract.” Through the lenses of ethnographic studies and anthropological theory, I propose a reinterpretation (...)
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  14.  19
    Is the Hobbesian State of Nature Racialized?Susanne Sreedhar - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (1):28-50.
    Thomas Hobbes, like other early modern social contract theorists, has been accused of promoting racist views in his philosophy – ideas used to justify European imperialism and the devastation of Indigenous peoples. I argue that his philosophy does not assume or promote a naturalized racial hierarchy. I demonstrate that the logic of Hobbes’s project requires rejecting a racially essentialist conception of human nature. His is a thoroughgoing and unrepentant anti-essentialism; he claims that there are no objective, immutable, necessary differences between (...)
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  15.  26
    Hobbes and Leibniz on the Nature and Grounds of Slavery.Iziah C. Topete - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (1):51-73.
    During a period when transatlantic slavery was still being racialized, Hobbes and Leibniz represent stark alternatives on the nature and justification of slavery. This article investigates Leibniz’s encounter with the Hobbesian position on slavery (servitus), drawing out the racial implications. Throughout his political works, Hobbes defended voluntary servitude by transforming a legacy of Roman jurisprudence that had come to be encapsulated in the law of nations (jus gentium). Hobbes defended the justification that a master could possess slaves as de jure (...)
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  16.  10
    Hobbesian Diffidence, Second-Order Discrimination, and Racial Profiling.Yolonda Y. Wilson - 2023 - Hobbes Studies 36 (1):74-96.
    Taking Hobbesian logic as my starting point, I argue that Hobbesian diffidence, one of the causes of quarrel in the state of nature, does not disappear once the citizens enter civil society. Rather, diffidence is merely contained by the sovereign. Following Alice Ristroph, I argue that diffidence comes to shape what citizens demand of the state/sovereign in the criminal law. However, I show that Ristroph does not fully appreciate that the concept of diffidence is a racialized one, and as such, (...)
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