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  1.  7
    Natural Philosophy, Deduction, and Geometry in the Hobbes-Boyle Debate.Marcus P. Adams - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):83-107.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 83 - 107 This paper examines Hobbes’s criticisms of Robert Boyle’s air-pump experiments in light of Hobbes’s account in _De Corpore_ and _De Homine_ of the relationship of natural philosophy to geometry. I argue that Hobbes’s criticisms rely upon his understanding of what counts as “true physics.” Instead of seeing Hobbes as defending natural philosophy as “a causal enterprise … [that] as such, secured total and irrevocable assent,” 1 I argue that, in his (...)
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  2.  2
    An Early European Critic of Hobbes’s De Corpore.Stephen Clucas - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):4-27.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 4 - 27 The _Animadversiones in Elementorum Philosophiae_ by a little known Flemish scholar G. Moranus, published in Brussels in 1655 was an early European response to Hobbes’s _De Corpore_. Although it is has been referred to by various Hobbes scholars, such as Noel Malcolm, Doug Jesseph, and Alexander Bird it has been little studied. Previous scholarship has tended to focus on the mathematical criticisms of André Tacquet which Moranus included in the form (...)
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  3.  1
    De Corpore.Douglas Jesseph - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):1-3.
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  4.  2
    Hobbes on the Ratios of Motions and Magnitudes.Douglas Jesseph - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):58-82.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 58 - 82 Hobbes intended and expected _De Corpore_ to secure his place among the foremost mathematicians of his era. This is evident from the content of Part III of the work, which contains putative solutions to the most eagerly sought mathematical results of the seventeenth century. It is well known that Hobbes failed abysmally in his attempts to solve problems of this sort, but it is not generally understood that the mathematics of (...)
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  5. Reading Between the Lines- Leo Strauss and the History of Early Modern Philosophy_, _edited by Winfried Schroeder.Paipais Vassilios - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):116-120.
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  6.  3
    Hobbes’s De Corpore on Modalities and Its Contemporary Critiques.Martine Pécharman - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):28-57.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 28 - 57 Hobbes considered as unambiguous and unproblematic his demonstration in _De Corpore_ that every effect past, present or future is necessary, since it always requires a sufficient cause that cannot be sufficient without being necessary, so that nothing is possible which will not be actual at some time. Now, this approach to necessity and possibility was received by his contemporary readers as missing its aim. Two immediate criticisms of _De Corpore_ by (...)
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  7. Mortal Gods: Science, Politics, and the Humanist Ambitions of Thomas Hobbes_, _Written by Ted H. Miller.Timothy Raylor - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):109-115.
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