Year:

  1.  2
    Religiosity, Spirituality and Work: A Systematic Literature Review and Research Directions.Sandra Leonara Obregon, Luis Felipe Dias Lopes, Fabiola Kaczam, Claudimar Pereira da Veiga & Wesley Vieira da Silva - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (2):573-595.
    This article presents the results of a systematic literature review on religiosity and spirituality, particularly in the work context. We aimed to verify the state-of-the-art of scientific production related to these themes. To achieve the proposed objective, we identified 312 articles published in journals in the period between 1960 and 2018 using a rigourous method of analysis and sorting, which resulted in 52 appropriate studies. The analyses presented are based on the three bibliometric laws: those of Lotka, Bradford and Zipf. (...)
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  2.  4
    Mapping Ethics Education in Accounting Research: A Bibliometric Analysis.Tamara Poje & Maja Zaman Groff - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (2):451-472.
    The attention being paid to ethics education in accounting has been increasing, especially after the corporate accounting scandals at the turn of the century. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the existing research in the field of ethics education in accounting. To synthesize past research, a bibliometric analysis that references 134 primary studies is performed and three bibliometric methods are applied. First, we visualize the historical evolution of ethics education in accounting research through historiography. Second, we use bibliographic coupling (...)
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  3.  2
    The Role of Compassion in Shaping Social Entrepreneurs’ Prosocial Opportunity Recognition.Ronit Yitshaki, Fredric Kropp & Benson Honig - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (2):617-647.
    Compassion is acknowledged as a key motivational source of prosocial opportunity recognition. This study examines the underlying processes of different types of compassion that lead to prosocial OR interventions designed to solve or ameliorate social problems. Self-compassion is associated with intimate personal experiences of suffering and encompasses a desire to alleviate the distress of others based on common humanity, mental distance and mindfulness. Other-regarding compassion is associated with value structures and social awareness and is based on a desire to help (...)
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  4.  10
    Virtue and Risk Culture in Finance.Anthony Asher & Tracy Wilcox - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):223-236.
    This article considers financial risk management practice using a virtue ethics lens, in response to ongoing critiques of risk management from within business ethics. Risk management should be seen as embedded within a complex system of cultures, organizations and regulations that are underpinned by a quantitatively reductive or ‘mechanistic’ economic paradigm, where dominant logics of self-interest, profit maximization and short-termism prevail. Building on recent work applying virtue ethics in finance, an alternative to the values, normative expectations and priorities in financial (...)
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  5.  4
    Religion and Mortgage Misrepresentation.James Conklin, Moussa Diop & Mingming Qiu - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):273-295.
    We investigate whether religion acts as a deterrent to the types of mortgage misrepresentation that played a significant role in the recent housing boom and bust. Using a large sample of mortgages originated from 2000 to 2007, we provide evidence that local religious adherence is associated with a lower likelihood of home appraisal overstatement and owner occupancy misreporting. The evidence on borrower income misrepresentation is mixed. Religiosity does not appear to reduce the incidence of income misrepresentation; however, it seems to (...)
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  6.  6
    “Make an Effort and Show Me the Love!” Effects of Indexical and Iconic Authenticity on Perceived Brand Ethicality.Gwarlann de Kerviler, Nico Heuvinck & Elodie Gentina - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):89-110.
    This article uncovers an important yet overlooked antecedent of brand ethicality that lies beyond the predominant focus on environmental and social actions in the literature: perceived brand authenticity. Perceived authenticity and brand ethicality strongly drive consumer decision making, but the link between the two has not been closely scrutinized. This article examines how two types of authenticity cues differently influence consumers’ perceptions of brand ethicality. Across five studies and four different product categories, the findings show that indexical authenticity cues lead (...)
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  7.  2
    Consequences of Ethical and Audit Violations: Evidence from the PCAOB Settled Disciplinary Orders.Prabashi Dharmasiri, Soon-Yeow Phang, Ashna Prasad & John Webster - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):179-203.
    We investigate the justifications provided by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board when sanctioning audit firms and individual auditors, as disclosed in the publicly released Settled Disciplinary Orders. Employing responsive regulation theory, we seek to gain an understanding of violating behaviors by audit firms and individual auditors that attract regulatory responses ranging in nature from persuasive to punitive sanctions. Using 298 SDOs issued by the PCAOB from 2005 to 2020, we find that the frequency and severity of PCAOB sanctions at (...)
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  8.  9
    Leveraging Artificial Intelligence in Marketing for Social Good—An Ethical Perspective.Erik Hermann - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):43-61.
    Artificial intelligence is shaping strategy, activities, interactions, and relationships in business and specifically in marketing. The drawback of the substantial opportunities AI systems and applications provide in marketing are ethical controversies. Building on the literature on AI ethics, the authors systematically scrutinize the ethical challenges of deploying AI in marketing from a multi-stakeholder perspective. By revealing interdependencies and tensions between ethical principles, the authors shed light on the applicability of a purely principled, deontological approach to AI ethics in marketing. To (...)
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  9.  3
    How to Deter Financial Misconduct If Crime Pays?Karol Marek Klimczak, Alejo José G. Sison, Maria Prats & Maximilian B. Torres - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):205-222.
    Financial misconduct has come into the spotlight in recent years, causing market regulators to increase the reach and severity of interventions. We show that at times the economic benefits of illicit financial activity outweigh the costs of litigation. We illustrate our argument with data from the US Securities and Exchanges Commission and a case of investment misconduct. From the neoclassical economic paradigm, which follows utilitarian thinking, it is rational to engage in misconduct. Still, the majority of professionals refrain from misconduct, (...)
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  10.  3
    Could You Ever Forget Me? Why People Want to Be Forgotten Online.Chanhee Kwak, Junyeong Lee & Heeseok Lee - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):25-42.
    The concept of people’s memory maintains the finiteness of time and capacity. However, with the advancement in technology, the amount of storage memory a person can use has increased dramatically. Given that digital traces can hardly be erased or forgotten, individuals have begun to express their desire to be forgotten in the digital world, and governments and academia are considering methods to fulfill such wishes. Capturing the difficulties in terms of a cultural lag between technological advancements and regulations on individuals’ (...)
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  11.  3
    When Supervisor Support Backfires: The Link Between Perceived Supervisor Support and Unethical Pro-Supervisor Behavior.Shike Li, Kriti Jain & Konstantina Tzini - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):133-151.
    Perceived supervisor support is widely studied in terms of its positive outcomes. This paper, in contrast, investigates employees’ unethical pro-supervisor behavior as a negative consequence of perceived supervisor support. Drawing upon the multifoci approach of social exchange theory and the reciprocity principle, we hypothesized that perceived supervisor support can engender unethical pro-supervisor behavior via employees’ feelings of reciprocity towards the supervisor. Building on the instrumental reasons that underlie social exchanges, we further hypothesized that this mediation relationship is stronger for employees (...)
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  12.  1
    The Effect of Gender on Investors’ Judgments and Decision-Making.Yi Luo & Steven E. Salterio - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):237-258.
    We examine whether an unsophisticated investor’s own gender interacts with gender of a sell-side equity analyst to affect the investor’s judgment. Prior research shows two potential sources of gender-based discrimination that affect female investors. First, female investors’ advisors offer less risky hence lower return portfolios to female investors than to male investors with similar risk preferences as female investors are perceived as more risk adverse. Second, female equity analysts are subject to greater barriers to enter and advance in investment firms (...)
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  13.  3
    Supporting Creativity or Creative Unethicality? Empowering Leadership and the Role of Performance Pressure.Ke Michael Mai, David T. Welsh, Fuxi Wang, John Bush & Kaifeng Jiang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):111-131.
    Organizational leaders are eager to unlock the creative potential of followers. Yet, there is growing evidence that creativity can also have a dark side within organizations. Building on research linking creativity and unethical behavior, we develop the construct of creative unethicality—behavior that is both unethical and novel. We draw on social exchange theory to develop a model that identifies both why and when creative unethicality emerges within organizations. Specifically, we investigate the exchange dynamics through which creative support provided by empowering (...)
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  14.  17
    Unethical Pro-organizational Behavior: A Systematic Review and Future Research Agenda.Madhurima Mishra, Koustab Ghosh & Dheeraj Sharma - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):63-87.
    Since the conceptualization of unethical pro-organizational behavior ten years ago, scholarly interest in exploring this phenomenon has multiplied. Given a burgeoning body of empirical research, a review of unethical pro-organizational behavior literature is warranted. This study, therefore, systematically reviews the extant literature on unethical pro-organizational behavior and presents a comprehensive theory-based review of the past developments in this field. We classify previous studies based on their underlying theoretical perspectives and discuss the antecedents and consequences of unethical pro-organizational behavior in work (...)
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  15.  13
    Board Gender Diversity and Managerial Obfuscation: Evidence From the Readability of Narrative Disclosure in 10-K Reports.Muhammad Nadeem - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):153-177.
    The readability of 10-K reports, in terms of linguistic complexity, determines the usefulness of information disclosure for stakeholders, particularly individual investors. Since investors largely depend on the financial communication in 10-K reports, firms have an ethical and legal responsibility to present disclosures in a language investors can understand. However, motivated by self-interest, managers obfuscate such disclosures to mask their own actions and hide unfavourable information. Building on the managerial obfuscation hypothesis grounded in stakeholder-agency and ethical-sensitivity theories, I hypothesize and empirically (...)
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  16.  9
    The Birth of an Action Repertoire: On the Origins of the Concept of Whistleblowing.Thomas Olesen - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):13-24.
    The standard account in whistleblowing research fixes the birth of the whistleblowing concept in the early 1970s. Surprisingly, there are no efforts to discuss why whistleblowing emerged as a distinct new action repertoire at this particular moment in time. Whistleblowing is a historical latecomer to an ethos of field transgression, which includes well-established forms of intervention such as watchdog journalism and political activism. Whistleblowing has strong affinities with these practices, but also holds its own unique place in ethics and democracy. (...)
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  17.  3
    The Detrimental Effects of Ethical Incongruence in Teams: An Interactionist Perspective of Ethical Fit on Relationship Conflict and Information Sharing.Natalie J. Shin, Jonathan C. Ziegert & Miriam Muethel - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):259-272.
    Building from an interactionist view of ethics, this study sought to integrate individual and contextual factors for understanding ethical perceptions in teams. Given the proximal nature of team members, this study specifically explored how individuals comparatively evaluate their own ethical behaviors and team members’ ethical behaviors to arrive at a perception of ethical person–group fit within a team. Grounding our theoretical arguments in relational schemas theory, we demonstrate that interpersonal ethical perceptions can have distal impacts on perceptions of team functioning. (...)
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  18.  6
    The Role of Religiosity in Ethical Decision-Making: A Study on Islam and the Malaysian Workplace.Rahizah Sulaiman, Paul Toulson, David Brougham, Frieder Lempp & Jarrod Haar - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):297-313.
    This study investigates how Islamic religiosity affects ethical decision making. The study was conducted in the Malaysian workforce across the public and private sectors with a sample of N = 160. Five factors are tested to determine if they mediate the relationship between Islamic religiosity and ethical intention. These factors are: perceived importance of the ethical issue, moral judgment, ego strength, spiritual intention, and conscience. A parallel mediation design was chosen to test six hypotheses derived from the theoretical literature. The (...)
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  19.  4
    Is It Freedom? The Coming About of the EU Directive on Whistleblower Protection.Wim Vandekerckhove - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):1-11.
    In November 2019 the EU Whistleblower Directive came into force. Whistleblowing has been described as a human right and a freedom fundamental to democracy. But it is not always straightforward to understand concrete cases of reporting wrongdoing in terms of abstract political philosophy. This paper uses a discussion between Berlin and Skinner about what negative freedom is, as a theoretical framework to understand the struggles of a campaigning platform of trade unions and civil society organizations, in the coming about of (...)
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  20.  16
    Artificial Intelligence and Declined Guilt: Retailing Morality Comparison Between Human and AI.Marilyn Giroux, Jungkeun Kim, Jacob C. Lee & Jongwon Park - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):1027-1041.
    Several technological developments, such as self-service technologies and artificial intelligence, are disrupting the retailing industry by changing consumption and purchase habits and the overall retail experience. Although AI represents extraordinary opportunities for businesses, companies must avoid the dangers and risks associated with the adoption of such systems. Integrating perspectives from emerging research on AI, morality of machines, and norm activation, we examine how individuals morally behave toward AI agents and self-service machines. Across three studies, we demonstrate that consumers’ moral concerns (...)
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  21.  3
    Guest Editorial: Business Ethics in the Era of Artificial Intelligence.Michael Haenlein, Ming-Hui Huang & Andreas Kaplan - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):867-869.
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  22.  14
    Ethics of AI-Enabled Recruiting and Selection: A Review and Research Agenda.Anna Lena Hunkenschroer & Christoph Luetge - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):977-1007.
    Companies increasingly deploy artificial intelligence technologies in their personnel recruiting and selection process to streamline it, making it faster and more efficient. AI applications can be found in various stages of recruiting, such as writing job ads, screening of applicant resumes, and analyzing video interviews via face recognition software. As these new technologies significantly impact people’s lives and careers but often trigger ethical concerns, the ethicality of these AI applications needs to be comprehensively understood. However, given the novelty of AI (...)
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  23.  5
    From Reality to World. A Critical Perspective on AI Fairness.Jean-Marie John-Mathews, Dominique Cardon & Christine Balagué - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):945-959.
    Fairness of Artificial Intelligence decisions has become a big challenge for governments, companies, and societies. We offer a theoretical contribution to consider AI ethics outside of high-level and top-down approaches, based on the distinction between “reality” and “world” from Luc Boltanski. To do so, we provide a new perspective on the debate on AI fairness and show that criticism of ML unfairness is “realist”, in other words, grounded in an already instituted reality based on demographic categories produced by institutions. Second, (...)
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  24.  3
    Employee Perceptions of the Effective Adoption of AI Principles.Stephanie Kelley - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):871-893.
    This study examines employee perceptions on the effective adoption of artificial intelligence principles in their organizations. 49 interviews were conducted with employees of 24 organizations across 11 countries. Participants worked directly with AI across a range of positions, from junior data scientist to Chief Analytics Officer. The study found that there are eleven components that could impact the effective adoption of AI principles in organizations: communication, management support, training, an ethics office, a reporting mechanism, enforcement, measurement, accompanying technical processes, a (...)
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  25.  9
    Sex Robots: Are We Ready for Them? An Exploration of the Psychological Mechanisms Underlying People’s Receptiveness of Sex Robots.Junzhao Ma, Dewi Tojib & Yelena Tsarenko - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):1091-1107.
    Artificial Intelligence -powered products have started to permeate various spheres of our lives. One of the most controversial of such products is the sex robot, an application of the AI-integrated robotic technology in the domain of human sexual gratification. The aim of this research is to understand the general public’s receptiveness towards this controversial new invention. Drawing upon the social intuitionist model, we find that the fear of AI, emblematic of the broader anxiety of technology’s encroachment on the human sphere, (...)
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  26.  4
    Advertising Benefits from Ethical Artificial Intelligence Algorithmic Purchase Decision Pathways.Waymond Rodgers & Tam Nguyen - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):1043-1061.
    Artificial intelligence has dramatically changed the way organizations communicate, understand, and interact with their potential consumers. In the context of this trend, the ethical considerations of advertising when applying AI should be the core question for marketers. This paper discusses six dominant algorithmic purchase decision pathways that align with ethical philosophies for online customers when buying a product/goods. The six ethical positions include: ethical egoism, deontology, relativist, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and ethics of care. Furthermore, this paper launches an “intelligent advertising” (...)
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  27.  5
    From Greenwashing to Machinewashing: A Model and Future Directions Derived From Reasoning by Analogy.Peter Seele & Mario D. Schultz - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):1063-1089.
    This article proposes a conceptual mapping to outline salient properties and relations that allow for a knowledge transfer from the well-established greenwashing phenomenon to the more recent machinewashing. We account for relevant dissimilarities, indicating where conceptual boundaries may be drawn. Guided by a “reasoning by analogy” approach, the article addresses the structural analogy and machinewashing idiosyncrasies leading to a novel and theoretically informed model of machinewashing. Consequently, machinewashing is defined as a strategy that organizations adopt to engage in misleading behavior (...)
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  28.  8
    The Ethics of Blockchain in Organizations.Monica M. Sharif & Farshad Ghodoosi - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):1009-1025.
    Blockchain is an open digital ledger technology that has the capability of significantly altering the way that people operations operate in organizations. This research takes a first step in proposing several ways in which the blockchain technology can be used to improve current organizational practices, while also considering the ethical implications. Specifically, the paper examines the role that blockchain technology plays in three primary areas of people operations: entry to the organization, intraorganizational processes, and exit. In each section, the paper (...)
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  29.  13
    Moral Judgments in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.Yulia W. Sullivan & Samuel Fosso Wamba - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):917-943.
    The current research aims to answer the following question: “who will be held responsible for harm involving an artificial intelligence system?” Drawing upon the literature on moral judgments, we assert that when people perceive an AI system’s action as causing harm to others, they will assign blame to different entity groups involved in an AI’s life cycle, including the company, the developer team, and even the AI system itself, especially when such harm is perceived to be intentional. Drawing upon the (...)
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  30.  7
    The Implications of Diverse Human Moral Foundations for Assessing the Ethicality of Artificial Intelligence.Jake B. Telkamp & Marc H. Anderson - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):961-976.
    Organizations are making massive investments in artificial intelligence, and recent demonstrations and achievements highlight the immense potential for AI to improve organizational and human welfare. Yet realizing the potential of AI necessitates a better understanding of the various ethical issues involved with deciding to use AI, training and maintaining it, and allowing it to make decisions that have moral consequences. People want organizations using AI and the AI systems themselves to behave ethically, but ethical behavior means different things to different (...)
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  31.  5
    The Dawn of the AI Robots: Towards a New Framework of AI Robot Accountability.Zsófia Tóth, Robert Caruana, Thorsten Gruber & Claudia Loebbecke - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):895-916.
    Business, management, and business ethics literature pay little attention to the topic of AI robots. The broad spectrum of potential ethical issues pertains to using driverless cars, AI robots in care homes, and in the military, such as Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems. However, there is a scarcity of in-depth theoretical, methodological, or empirical studies that address these ethical issues, for instance, the impact of morality and where accountability resides in AI robots’ use. To address this dearth, this study offers a (...)
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  32.  1
    Too Good To Be True: Influencing Credibility Perceptions with Signaling Reference Explicitness and Assurance Depth.Carolin Baier, Max Göttsche, Andreas Hellmann & Frank Schiemann - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):695-714.
    We investigate how the selection of assurance topics and the format of their communication influence the credibility perception of sustainability report readers. This is important because misleading communication may discredit ethical sustainability assurance practices. Based on signaling theory and using an experimental approach, we are the first to examine false credibility signals in the context of sustainability assurance. We find that two variables related to sustainability assurance, reference explicitness and assurance depth, jointly influence the assurance signal and the perceived credibility (...)
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  33.  3
    Antagonism to Protagonism: Tracing the Historical Contours of Legalization in an Emerging Industry.Shalini Bhawal & Manjula S. Salimath - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):783-801.
    We explore the legalization of the cannabis industry in the US, and point at the conflicted path through which this emerging industry has traversed. In particular, we highlight how this industry has navigated controversy to become one of the fastest growing industries in the world. The paper also offers a theoretical model that explains the role played by social movements to propel and shape early antagonism towards increasing protagonism. Evidence of the latter is seen in the form of cannabis laws (...)
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  34. Between Market Failures and Justice Failures: Trade-Offs Between Efficiency and Equality in Business Ethics.Charlie Blunden - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):647–660.
    The Market Failures Approach (MFA) is one of the leading theories in contemporary business ethics. It generates a list of ethical obligations for the managers of private firms that states that they should not create or exploit market failures because doing so reduces the efficiency of the economy. Recently the MFA has been criticised by Abraham Singer on the basis that it unjustifiably does not assign private managers obligations based on egalitarian values. Singer proposes an extension to the MFA, the (...)
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  35.  4
    Attuned HRM Systems for Social Enterprises.Silvia Dorado, Ying Chen, Andrea M. Prado & Virginia Simon - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):829-848.
    This paper is motivated by a puzzling observation made when conducting a case study of ProCredit, a well-known social bank. The HR practices that this social enterprise adopted to cultivate mission identification were unfavorably impacting its retention rate. Building on prior research and our analysis of the case, we argue the need for SEs to embrace HRM systems that are both mission-identification proactive and employee-retention preemptive. It theorizes that these HRM systems should be attuned to the labor market conditions that (...)
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  36.  2
    Power Imbalance and the Dark Side of the Captive Agri-Food Supplier–Buyer Relationship.Richard Glavee-Geo, Per Engelseth & Arnt Buvik - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):609-628.
    This paper highlights the dark side of power imbalance regarding its consequences in agri-food supplier–buyer relationships. We report on findings from two studies. The first study is based on a sample of 105 key informants, while study 2 is based on a sample of 444 key informants, all from the cocoa agri-food supply market of Ghana. While the first study focuses on the antecedents of power imbalance and its consequences, the second study explores the role of cooperatives/collective action in minimizing (...)
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  37.  8
    Making Sense of Stigmatized Organizations: Labelling Contests and Power Dynamics in Social Evaluation Processes.Gro Kvåle & Zuzana Murdoch - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):675-693.
    How do social audiences negotiate and handle stigmatized organizations? What role do their heterogenous values, norms and power play in this process? Addressing these questions is important from a business ethics perspective to improve our understanding of the ethical standards against which organizations are judged as well as the involved prosecutorial incentives. Moreover, it illuminates ethical concerns about when and how power imbalances may induce inequity in the burdens imposed by such social evaluations. We address these questions building on two (...)
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  38.  3
    Law Lost, Compliance Found: A Frontline Understanding of the Non-linear Nature of Business and Employee Responses to Law.Na Li & Benjamin van Rooij - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):715-734.
    This paper seeks to understand the transmission and reception of legal rules as a component of the regulatory compliance process. It adopts a frontline approach to regulatory compliance that traces the grassroot functioning of compliance processes from regulator, to compliance managers to individual employees. Through a multilevel and multi-sited ethnography of worker safety protection in Chinese construction industry, this paper shows that in the cases studied there is a fundamental disconnect in the transmission and reception of law from regulator to (...)
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  39.  5
    Ethics, Economics, and the Specter of Naturalism: The Enduring Relevance of the Harmony Doctrine School of Economics.Andrew Lynn - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):661-673.
    This article revisits the "harmony doctrine" school of economics and its distinctive understanding of how ethics and economics intersect. Harmony doctrine thinkers staked out a “natural” understanding of economic phenomena that in many ways fused the classical political economy of Adam Smith with the earlier French Physiocratic School. Their metaphysically grounded interpretation was largely eclipsed by the developments of utilitarian and marginalist schools by the end of the nineteenth century. Yet harmony doctrine thinking adhered to a distinct understanding of how (...)
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  40.  5
    Corporate Accountability Towards Species Extinction Protection: Insights from Ecologically Forward-Thinking Companies.Lee Roberts, Monomita Nandy, Abeer Hassan, Suman Lodh & Ahmed A. Elamer - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):571-595.
    This paper contributes to biodiversity and species extinction literature by examining the relationship between corporate accountability in terms of species protection and factors affecting such accountability from forward-thinking companies. We use triangulation of theories, namely deep ecology, legitimacy, and we introduce a new perspective to the stakeholder theory that considers species as a ‘stakeholder’. Using Poisson pseudo-maximum likelihood regression, we examine a sample of 200 Fortune Global companies over 3 years. Our results indicate significant positive relations between ecologically conscious companies (...)
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  41.  11
    Posthuman Affirmative Business Ethics: Reimagining Human–Animal Relations Through Speculative Fiction.Janet Sayers, Lydia Martin & Emma Bell - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):597-608.
    Posthuman affirmative ethics relies upon a fluid, nomadic conception of the ethical subject who develops affective, material and immaterial connections to multiple others. Our purpose in this paper is to consider what posthuman affirmative business ethics would look like, and to reflect on the shift in thinking and practice this would involve. The need for a revised understanding of human–animal relations in business ethics is amplified by crises such as climate change and pandemics that are related to ecologically destructive business (...)
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  42.  4
    Changes in Corporate Social Responsibility and Stock Performance.Hui-Ju Tsai & Yangru Wu - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):735-755.
    We study the relationship between corporate social performance and financial performance by comparing the portfolio returns of firms with changes in corporate social responsibility intensity. Using an extensive US sample from the MSCI ESG database, we find that improvement in the overall CSR is generally value enhancing. The relationship varies with CSR dimensions. More importantly, the relationship shifts differently for various CSR dimensions during the crisis period when trust in the society is low and financial resource is limited. Improvement in (...)
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  43.  7
    Ethical Work Climate 2.0: A Normative Reformulation of Victor and Cullen’s 1988 Framework.James Weber & Akwasi Opoku-Dakwa - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):629-646.
    Ethical work climate, introduced by Bart Victor and John Cullen, plays a central role in the business ethics literature due to its influence on employee’s ethical decision-making. Yet, the often-used framework is limited as a descriptive and prescriptive model because it lacks a normative focus and does not allow for organizations guided by universal ethical principles. We revisit Victor and Cullen’s original conceptualization of ethical climate and propose a reformulation of the ethical criteria to be conceptually consistent with Kohlberg’s theory (...)
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  44.  6
    Doing Well and Doing Good: How Responsible Entrepreneurship Shapes Female Entrepreneurial Success.Xuemei Xie & Yonghui Wu - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):803-828.
    This study examines the role of responsible entrepreneurship among female entrepreneurs by examining how and when responsible entrepreneurship may exert a positive influence on female entrepreneurial success. Using the data collected from 337 Chinese female entrepreneurs, and by integrating responsible entrepreneurship research with a dynamic capability framework, our findings show, firstly, that responsible entrepreneurship is positively correlated to female entrepreneurial success; secondly, this relationship is mediated by female entrepreneurs’ opportunity recognition; and thirdly, the indirect effect of responsible entrepreneurship on female (...)
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  45.  8
    How Human–Chatbot Interaction Impairs Charitable Giving: The Role of Moral Judgment.Yuanyuan Zhou, Zhuoying Fei, Yuanqiong He & Zhilin Yang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):849-865.
    Interactions between human beings and chatbots are gradually becoming part of our everyday social lives. It is still unclear how human–chatbot interactions, compared to human–human interactions, influence individual morality. Building on the dual-process theory of moral judgment, a secondary data analysis, and two scenario-based experiments provide sufficient evidence that HCIs support utilitarian judgments, which reduce participants' donation amount. Study 3 further demonstrates that the negative effects of HCIs can be attenuated by inducing a social-oriented communication style in chatbots’ verbal language (...)
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  46.  5
    Deliberating Our Frames: How Members of Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives Use Shared Frames to Tackle Within-Frame Conflicts Over Sustainability Issues.Angelika Zimmermann, Nora Albers & Jasper O. Kenter - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):757-782.
    Multi-stakeholder initiatives have been praised as vehicles for tackling complex sustainability issues, but their success relies on the reconciliation of stakeholders’ divergent perspectives. We yet lack a thorough understanding of the micro-level mechanisms by which stakeholders can deal with these differences. To develop such understanding, we examine what frames—i.e., mental schemata for making sense of the world—members of MSIs use during their discussions on sustainability questions and how these frames are deliberated through social interactions. Whilst prior framing research has focussed (...)
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  47.  2
    Contracts Capsized by COVID-19: A Legal and Jewish Ethical Analysis.Tsuriel Rashi & Andrew A. Schwartz - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (2):403-413.
    Countless contracts have been undermined by the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 as well as government orders to contain it. Flights have been canceled, concerts have been called off, and dorms have been closed, just to name a few. Do these all count as breaches of contract—or are the parties excused due to the extraordinary circumstances? And how should the losses be allocated between the parties? The law provides one set of answers to these questions; ethics offers another. With a focus (...)
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  48.  7
    Correction to: Auxiliaries to Abusive Supervisors: The Spillover Effects of Peer Mistreatment on Employee Performance.Yuntao Bai, Lili Lu & Li Lin-Schilstra - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):239-239.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-021-04793-5.
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  49.  4
    Recruiting Dark Personalities for Earnings Management.Ling L. Harris, Scott B. Jackson, Joel Owens & Nicholas Seybert - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):193-218.
    Prior research indicates that managers’ dark personality traits increase their tendency to engage in disruptive and unethical organizational behaviors including accounting earnings management. Other research suggests that the prevalence of dark personalities in management may represent an accidental byproduct of selecting managers with accompanying desirable attributes that fit the stereotype of a “strong leader.” Our paper posits that organizations may hire some managers who have dark personality traits because their willingness to push ethical boundaries aligns with organizational objectives, particularly in (...)
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  50.  1
    Like It or Not: When Corporate Social Responsibility Does Not Attract Potential Applicants.Eva Alexandra Jakob, Holger Steinmetz, Marius Claus Wehner, Christina Engelhardt & Rüdiger Kabst - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):105-127.
    Companies increasingly recognize the importance of communicating corporate social responsibility including their engagement toward employees, the community, the environment and other stakeholder groups to attract applicants. The positive findings on the effect of CSR on applicants’ reactions are commonly based on the assumption that companies send a clear signal about their commitment to CSR. However, communication is always contextualized and has become more ambiguous through the increased availability of information online. External stakeholders including actual and potential applicants are confronted with (...)
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  51.  7
    The Taming of Machiavellians: Differentiated Transformational Leadership Effects on Machiavellians’ Organizational Commitment and Citizenship Behavior.Bonjin Koo & Eun-Suk Lee - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):153-170.
    This study seeks effective ways for managing employees with a high Machiavellian personality in organizations by identifying how to enhance their pro-organizational attitudes and behaviors [organizational citizenship behavior ] through transformational leadership. Drawing upon the dual-focused model of TFL, we suggest that exerting TFL upon employees high in Machiavellianism involves ethical dilemmas in that individual-focused and group-focused TFL have contrasting effects on leading pro-organizational attitudes/behaviors among these pro-individual employees. Analysis of data from 184 employees working in South Korea shows that (...)
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  52.  4
    Correction to: Deliberating or Stalling for Justice? Dynamics of Corporate Remediation and Victim Resistance Through the Lens of Parentalism: The Fundão dam Collapse and the Renova Foundation in Brazil.Rajiv Maher - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):37-37.
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  53.  9
    Through New Eyes: Artificial Intelligence, Technological Unemployment, and Transhumanism in Kazuo Ishiguro’s Klara and the Sun.Santiago Mejia & Dominique Nikolaidis - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):303-306.
    Klara and the Sun, the latest novel by Nobel-prize winner Kazuo Ishiguro, forces one to reckon with one's own anxieties about the future of emerging technologies and confront deep questions about the nature of dignity, existence, and humanity. The novel also provides one with complex characters and a speculative future through which to live new lives, experience novel worlds, and see through different eyes. At the same time, the novel’s world offers us an uncanny distance from our own, making us (...)
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  54.  3
    Feeling Competitiveness or Empathy Towards Negotiation Counterparts Mitigates Sex Differences in Lying.Jason R. Pierce & Leigh Thompson - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):71-87.
    Men typically express more willingness than women to perpetrate fraudulent acts like lying in negotiations. However, women express just as much willingness in some cases. We develop and test a theory to explain these mixed findings. Specifically, we hypothesize that situational cues that bring about competitive or empathic feelings mitigate sex differences in lying to negotiation counterparts. Results from four experiments confirm our hypotheses. Experiment 1 showed that men and women express equal willingness to lie when negotiating with counterparts toward (...)
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  55.  3
    Evidence on the Economic Consequences of Marriage Equality and LGBT Human Rights.Jessie Y. Zhu & Wally Smieliauskas - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):57-70.
    The recent wave of same-sex marriage legalization marks the most significant human rights progress in decades. Nevertheless, the valuation effects on corporate America are unclear. While the arguments supporting marriage equality are largely in the domain of law and sociology, many prominent business leaders are actively engaged in campaigns advocating marriage equality. This suggests that the LGBT civil rights movement of our generation might have valuation implications for corporate America beyond human rights equality. This paper investigates the market perception of (...)
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  56.  3
    Challenges and Insights From South Asia for Imagining Ethical Organizations: Introduction to the Special Issue.Fahreen Alamgir, Hari Bapuji & Raza Mir - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):717-728.
    South Asia is a region that two billion world citizens call home. It connotes not only a geographical place but a discursive space that, despite its heterogeneities of ethnicity and political experience, is joined at the hip by a shared experience of colonialism, sovereignty, and globalized neoliberalism. As a result, South Asia is also a site of aspiration and struggle, as well as emancipation and exploitation. Research in business ethics has not adequately addressed the challenges faced by this region, and (...)
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  57.  2
    A National Governance Approach to the Political Nature and Role of Business: Case Study of the Mobile Telecommunications Industry in Afghanistan.Sameer Azizi - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):843-860.
    The study focuses on the mobile telecommunications industry in Afghanistan prior to the Taliban takeover of the country in 2021 and seeks to study how the mobile telecommunications corporations engage with the different area-specific governance systems in order to gain legitimacy to operate across Afghanistan. The study capitalises on mixed qualitative data to conduct an embedded case study of the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry as an extreme context for understanding business-society relations in South Asia. Theoretically, the article integrates insights from (...)
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  58.  2
    Ethical Complexity of Social Change: Negotiated Actions of a Social Enterprise.Babita Bhatt - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):743-762.
    This paper investigates how social enterprises navigate through the ethical complexity of social change and extends the ethical quandaries faced by social enterprises beyond organisational boundaries. Building on the emerging literature on the ethics of SEs, I conceptualise ethics as an engagement with power relations. I develop theoretical arguments to understand the interaction between ethical predispositions of a SE and the normative structure of the social system in which it operates. I applied this conceptualisation in a hierarchical and heterogeneous rural (...)
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  59.  4
    Shaking Up (and Keeping Intact) the Old Boys’ Network: The Impact of the Mandatory Gender Quota on the Board of Directors in India.Bibek Bhattacharya, Ipsu Khadka & Dalhia Mani - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):763-778.
    Prior research on the impact of mandatory quotas in one dimension of diversity, on other dimensions, shows contradictory results. We seek to resolve this puzzle by relying on theory in social psychology on homophily and recategorization processes in hiring. In the context of a law mandating a gender quota on Indian boards, we predict and find that boards respond to the law by hiring new women directors who are similar to existing directors in terms of caste and community dimensions. We (...)
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  60.  3
    Why Disability Mainstreaming is Good for Business: A New Narrative.Sanjukta Choudhury Kaul, Quamrul Alam & Manjit Singh Sandhu - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):861-873.
    In developed economies, powerful legislative and regulatory frameworks, for people with disability over the last five decades, have provided major motivation for business compliance with disability in the workplaces. However, developing economy like India is marked by emergent disability legislation, weak institutional enforcement and an evolving disability rights movement. In the absence of strong institutional expectations, the private sector’s role in mainstreaming the disability agenda has been largely an act of voluntary participation. Drawing upon an in-depth, multilevel, cross-functional qualitative study (...)
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  61.  1
    Organizations as Spaces for Caring: A Case of an Anti-trafficking Organization in India.Roscoe Conan D’Souza & Ignasi Martí - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):829-842.
    Prior research has shown that human trafficking has multiple facets and is deeply enmeshed in societies around the world. Two central challenges for anti-trafficking organizations pertain to confronting systemic injustices and establishing caring organizations for survivors to start the process of healing and restoration. Analyzing the work of an anti-trafficking organization, International Sanctuary in Mumbai, we seek to elucidate how a space for caring for trafficking survivors is constructed in a largely non-egalitarian and unjust context. We contribute to discussions on (...)
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  62.  1
    Philanthropy and the Making of a New Moral Order: A History of Developing Community.Arun Kumar - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):729-741.
    Community development, or the socio-economic transformation of local communities, has been a significant focus of organizational ethics. Such community development programmes—whether led by state, civil society, or businesses—are animated by modernization and have involved, I argue, the production of a new moral order. As part of which, communities were imagined in particular ways, historically. Drawing on a periodization of history of philanthropy of the Tata Group from the 1860s onwards, I outline the four stages involved in the production of this (...)
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  63.  1
    Ambedkar, Radical Interdependence and Dignity: A Study of Women Mall Janitors in India.Ramaswami Mahalingam & Patturaja Selvaraj - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):813-828.
    In this paper, using Ambedkar’s pioneering vision for engaged Buddhism, we developed the notion of radical interdependence, which consists of four interrelated processes: dialogical recognition; negating invisibilities; dignity as an embodied praxis; ordinary cosmopolitanism. Our research primarily focused on women janitors’ lives in a Mumbai Mall using this conception. Our participants experienced four different kinds of dignity injuries. They used various strategies to preserve personal, intersubjective, and processual dignities. We also found horizontal and vertical ordinary cosmopolitanism strategies to bridge social (...)
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  64.  2
    From Fear to Courage: Indian Lesbians’ and Gays’ Quest for Inclusive Ethical Organizations.Ernesto Noronha, Nidhi S. Bisht & Premilla D’Cruz - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):779-797.
    This paper focusses on the experiences of Indian lesbians and gays who are subjected to unethical acts of workplace bullying which get manifested through constant guesswork, comments and questioning about their sexual identity in the hostile Indian context. Given this, LG participants usually opt for secrecy and lead a double life, using ‘passing’ and ‘covering’ strategies to manage economic, social and psychological risks. Nonetheless, this paper rewrites the negative tenor of lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transexuals research by underscoring how LG (...)
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  65. Inequality Regimes, Patriarchal Connectivity, and the Elusive Right to Own Land for Women in Pakistan.Ghazal Mir Zulfiqar - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):799-811.
    This study addresses the gap between policy and practice on the issue of women’s right to own rural land through a qualitative study conducted in Pakistan’s two largest provinces, Punjab and Sindh. A recent survey finds that only 4% of women own rural land in Pakistan. Given the relatively large agrarian economy, land is a key resource determining women’s agency. To understand the dynamics that maintain this status quo, I use two distinct strands of feminist theory. First is Joan Acker’s (...)
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  66.  6
    Does the Narcissist (and Those Around Him/Her) Pay a Price for Being Narcissistic? An Empirical Study of Leaders’ Narcissism and Well-Being.Jeremy B. Bernerth - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):533-546.
    Using a social exchange perspective of narcissism as the foundation for study hypotheses, this study explored the relationship between leaders’ narcissism and the well-being of both leaders and subordinates at the individual and group levels. Results from a sample of 1017 subordinates working under 424 leaders generally support the hypothesized models finding leaders’ narcissism negatively relates to leader-member exchange, and that LMX subsequently relates to subordinates’ job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. At the group level, leaders’ narcissism also negatively relates to (...)
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  67.  3
    Adversity Tries Friends: A Multilevel Analysis of Corporate Philanthropic Response to the Local Spread of COVID-19 in China.Hanwen Chen, Siyi Liu, Xin Liu & Daoguang Yang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):585-612.
    We examine corporate philanthropic decisions in response to the local spread of COVID-19. From a strategic perspective, firms may proactively undertake philanthropic efforts to limit the spread of the pandemic and avoid a degraded business environment. From the perspective of non-trivial costs, increased economic uncertainty can raise concerns about business survival and lead to conservative philanthropic strategies. Following the proverb “prosperity makes friends, adversity tries them,” at the provincial level, our results support the second perspective. Specifically, when the spread of (...)
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  68.  1
    The Effects of Top Management Team National Diversity and Institutional Uncertainty on Subsidiary CSR Focus.Sven Dahms, Suthikorn Kingkaew & Eddy S. Ng - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):699-715.
    This research investigates how top management team national diversity and corporate social responsibility institutional uncertainty affect strategic CSR focus in foreign-owned subsidiaries. The paper develops a theoretical framework based on institutional theory and upper echelon perspectives to test a sample of MNE subsidiaries. Survey data were collected from subsidiaries in Thailand and Taiwan. Non-symmetric analysis suggests that while TMTND plays an important role in establishing a CSR focus, it is not conducive in itself to high-performance outcomes. Performance is measured by (...)
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  69.  9
    When Discrimination is Worse, Autonomy is Key: How Women Entrepreneurs Leverage Job Autonomy Resources to Find Work–Life Balance.Dirk De Clercq & Steven A. Brieger - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):665-682.
    This article examines the relationship between women entrepreneurs’ job autonomy and work–life balance, with a particular focus on how this relationship might be augmented by environments that discriminate against women, whether socio-economically, institutionally, or culturally. Multisource data pertaining to 5334 women entrepreneurs from 37 countries indicate that their sense of job autonomy increases the likelihood that they feel satisfied with their ability to balance the needs of their work with those of their personal life. This process is particularly prominent when (...)
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  70.  2
    Nudges in SRI: The Power of the Default Option.Jean-Francois Gajewski, Marco Heimann & Luc Meunier - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):547-566.
    We introduce nudges in order to incite investors to choose Socially Responsible Investment funds instead of traditional funds. We have set up two online experiments with a total of 713 US retail investors, using three types of nudges to elicit their effects on investors’ SRI investments level: making SRI the default investment, introducing a SRI explanation message, and priming ethical values by displaying shocking images. Making SRI the default option is the most efficient nudge to influence investors towards SRI. Its (...)
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  71.  6
    Emotional Intelligence and Deception: A Theoretical Model and Propositions.Joseph P. Gaspar, Redona Methasani & Maurice E. Schweitzer - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):567-584.
    Deception is pervasive in negotiations and organizations, and emotions are critical to using, detecting, and responding to deception. In this article, we introduce a theoretical model to explore the interplay between emotional intelligence and deception in negotiations. In our model, we propose that emotional intelligence influences the decision to use deception, the effectiveness of deception, the ability to detect deception, and the consequences of deception. We consider the emotional intelligence of both deceivers and targets, and we consider characteristics of negotiators, (...)
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  72. Ruthless Exploiters or Ethical Guardians of the Workforce? Powerful CEOs and Their Impact on Workplace Safety and Health.Jesper Haga, Fredrik Huhtamäki & Dennis Sundvik - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):641-663.
    The allocation of resources among different stakeholders is an ethical dilemma for chief executive officers. In this study, we investigate the association between CEO power and workplace injuries and illnesses. We use an establishment-level dataset comprising 31,924 establishment-year observations between 2002 and 2011. Our main result shows that employees at firms with structurally powerful CEOs experience fewer workplace injuries and illnesses and days away from work. We reason that CEOs derive a private benefit from low injury and illness rates and (...)
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  73.  1
    Angry but Not Deviant: Employees’ Prior-Day Deviant Behavior Toward the Family Buffers Their Reactions to Abusive Supervisory Behavior.Andrew Li, Chenwei Liao, Ping Shao & Jason Huang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):683-697.
    Integrating affective events theory, work-family compensation, and moral balance theory, the present study proposes a model that examines how and when abusive supervisory behavior is related to employees’ deviant behavior toward their supervisor. Using a diary method that involved two surveys per day over two weeks, we found support for our model based on 707 daily observations from 130 employees. Specifically, anger toward one’s supervisor mediated the relationship between abusive supervisory behavior and deviant behavior toward one’s supervisor. In addition, the (...)
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  74.  5
    Stakeholder Friction.Kirsten Martin & Robert Phillips - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):519-531.
    A mainstay of stakeholder management is the belief that firms create value when they invest more time, money, and attention to stakeholders than is necessary for the immediate transaction. This tendency to repeat interactions with the same set of stakeholders fosters what we call stakeholder friction. Stakeholder friction is a term for the collection of social, legal, and economic forces leading firms to prioritize and reinvest in current stakeholders. For many stakeholder scholars, such friction is close to universally beneficial, but (...)
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  75.  15
    Is Femvertising the New Greenwashing? Examining Corporate Commitment to Gender Equality.Yvette Sterbenk, Sara Champlin, Kasey Windels & Summer Shelton - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):491-505.
    This study examined the potential for a new area of corporate social responsibility washing: gender equality. Companies are increasingly recognized for advertisements promoting gender equality, termed “femvertisements.” However, it is unclear whether companies that win femvertising awards actually support women with an institutionalized approach to gender equality. A quantitative content analysis was performed assessing company leadership team listings, annual reports, CSR reports, and CSR websites of 61 US-based companies to compare the prevalence of internal and external gender-equality CSR activities of (...)
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  76.  94
    The Radical Behavioral Challenge and Wide-Scope Obligations in Business.Hasko von Kriegstein - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):507-517.
    This paper responds to the Radical Behavioral Challenge to normative business ethics. According to RBC, recent research on bounded ethicality shows that it is psychologically impossible for people to follow the prescriptions of normative business ethics. Thus, said prescriptions run afoul of the principle that nobody has an obligation to do something that they cannot do. I show that the only explicit response to this challenge in the business ethics literature is flawed because it limits normative business ethics to condemning (...)
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  77.  3
    Pathways to Lasting Cross-Sector Social Collaboration: A Configurational Study.Christiana Weber, Helen Haugh, Markus Göbel & Hannes Leonardy - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):613-639.
    Cross-sector social collaborations are increasingly recognised as valuable inter-organizational arrangements that seek to combine the commercial capabilities of private sector companies with the deep knowledge of social and environmental issues enrooted in social sector organizations. In this paper we empirically examine the configurations of conditions that lead to lasting cross-sector social collaboration. Situating our enquiry in Schütz’s theory of life-worlds and the reciprocity literature, we employ fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis to analyse data gathered from 60 partners in 30 cross-sector social (...)
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  78.  4
    Family-Supportive Supervisor Behavior, Felt Obligation, and Unethical Pro-Family Behavior: The Moderating Role of Positive Reciprocity Beliefs.Ken Cheng, Qianlin Zhu & Yinghui Lin - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):261-273.
    Drawing on social exchange theory, we argue that family-supportive supervisor behavior inhibits employees’ unethical pro-family behavior via the mediation of felt obligation. We further propose that employees’ positive reciprocity beliefs strengthen the hypothesized relationships. Using a sample consisting of 345 full-time employees from an Internet service company located in China, we found that felt obligation partially mediated the negative relationship between FSSB and UPFB and that the FSSB-felt obligation relationship and the mediation relationship were stronger for employees with higher positive (...)
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  79.  2
    The Effect of Regulation on Sustainable Procurement: Organisational Leadership and Culture as Mediators.Daniel Etse, Adela McMurray & Nuttawuth Muenjohn - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):305-325.
    The study reported in this paper sought to examine the extent to which organisational leadership support and organisational culture explain the effect of regulation on sustainable procurement practice, as insights into this relationship is lacking in the extant literature. Useable survey data from 322 Ghanaian organisations were analysed using descriptive statistics, and structural equation modelling techniques. The analysis examined the nature of sustainable procurement practice in an African context, and the potential mediating effects of organisational leadership support and organisational culture (...)
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  80.  6
    Vulnerable Populations and Individual Social Responsibility in Prosocial Crowdfunding: Does the Framing Matter for Female and Rural Entrepreneurs?Maria Figueroa-Armijos & John P. Berns - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):377-394.
    Prosocial crowdfunding was originally conceived as a financial mechanism to assist vulnerable unbanked populations, typically excluded from formal financial markets. It subsequently grew into a billion-dollar scheme in the multi-billion-dollar crowdfunding industry. However, recent evidence claims prosocial crowdfunding may be shifting away from its goal to support the poor and underserved. Drawing on a composite social responsibility and framing theory framework, we examine the role that vulnerability plays in successfully raising funds in a prosocial crowdfunding context. We conduct multilevel logistic (...)
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  81.  15
    Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence and CSR: Radical Feminist Theory and a Human Rights Perspective.Kate Grosser & Meagan Tyler - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):217-232.
    This paper extends Corporate Social Responsibility scholarship to focus on issues of sexual harassment and sexual violence. Despite a significant body of work on gender and CSR from a variety of feminist perspectives, long-standing evidence of sexual harassment and sexual violence in business, particularly in global value chains, and the rise of the #MeToo movement, there has been little scholarship focused specifically on these issues in the context of CSR. Our conceptual paper addresses this gap in the literature through two (...)
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  82.  7
    The Gender Effects of Audit Partners on Audit Outcomes: Evidence of Rule 3211 Adoption.Jie Hao, Viet Pham & Meng Guo - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):275-304.
    This paper investigates whether the impact of PCAOB Rule 3211 on the quality and cost of audit services differs between female and male audit partners. We find that the improvement of audit quality is more pronounced for female audit partners than male partners after Rule 3211 adoption. Female audit partners are also associated with higher increases in fees and report lags than male counterparts after the adoption of Rule 3211. Further, we find that the presence of female CFOs attenuate the (...)
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  83.  1
    Longitudinal Patterns of Ethical Organisational Culture as a Context for Leaders’ Well-Being: Cumulative Effects Over 6 Years.Mari Huhtala, Muel Kaptein, Joona Muotka & Taru Feldt - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):421-442.
    The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the temporal dynamics of ethical organisational culture and how it associates with well-being at work when potential changes in ethical culture are measured over an extended period of 6 years. We used a person-centred study design, which allowed us to detect both typical and atypical patterns of ethical culture stability as well as change among a sample of leaders. Based on latent profile analysis and hierarchical linear modelling we found longitudinal, concurrent (...)
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  84.  3
    Theoretical Insights of CSR Research in Communication from 1980 to 2018: A Bibliometric Network Analysis.Yi Grace Ji, Weiting Tao & Hyejoon Rim - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):327-349.
    Communication, as a discipline that generates a rich body of literature on CSR, has become a critical contributor to CSR knowledge in social science. However, limited research exists to understand how CSR knowledge is constructed and diffused in the discipline. This study thus intends to unpack the knowledge construction process of CSR research in the communication discipline from a network perspective. Invisible college was adopted as the conceptual framework. Article and theory/concept networks were constructed with 290 peer-reviewed articles from 61 (...)
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  85.  8
    Do Personal Beliefs and Values Affect an Individual’s “Fraud Tolerance”? Evidence from the World Values Survey.W. Robert Knechel & Natalia Mintchik - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):463-489.
    We introduce the concept of fraud tolerance, validate the conceptualization using prior studies in economics and criminology as well as our own independent tests, and explore the relationship of fraud tolerance with numerous cultural attributes using data from the World Values Survey. Applying partial least squares path modeling, we find that people with stronger self-enhancing values exhibit higher fraud tolerance. Further, respondents who believe in the importance of hard work exhibit lower fraud tolerance, and such beliefs mediate the relationship between (...)
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  86.  5
    State-Level Culture and Workplace Diversity Policies: Evidence from US Firms.Sivathaasan Nadarajah, Muhammad Atif & Ammar Ali Gull - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):443-462.
    This paper examines the effect of state-level culture in the US on the adoption of firms’ workplace diversity policies. Using firm-level panel data over the period 2011–2014, we document that firms in highly individualistic states are less likely to adopt workplace diversity policies, which in turn negatively affects firm performance. Our results are robust to alternative variables and econometric specifications. Our findings provide insights into the contemporary debate on the economic aspects of workplace diversity policies for firms operating in different (...)
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  87.  13
    Audit Partner Gender, Leadership and Ethics: The Case of Earnings Management.Mehdi Nekhili, Fahim Javed & Haithem Nagati - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):233-260.
    Our study examines whether gender-diverse engagement partners constrain unethical earnings management behavior in a French mandatory joint audit setting. The investigation of the joint audit setting, by raising concerns about audit team organization and management, provides new insights into how gender-diverse audit partners contribute to the effectiveness of audit decision-making, resulting in reduced earnings management. The need for effective collaboration and communication between joint auditors may foster a transformational leadership style on the part of audit engagement partners. In this regard, (...)
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  88.  14
    Board Gender Diversity and Corporate Response to Cyber Risk: Evidence From Cybersecurity Related Disclosure.Camélia Radu & Nadia Smaili - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):351-374.
    Cyber risk has become one of the greatest threats to firms in recent years. Accordingly, boards of directors must be continually vigilant about this danger. They have a duty to ensure that the companies adopt appropriate cybersecurity measures to manage the risk of cyber fraud. Boards should also ensure that the firm disclose material cyber risk and breaches. We examine how the board’s gender composition can influence the extent of such disclosure, based on a sample of the companies listed on (...)
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  89.  6
    Correction to: Board Gender Diversity and Corporate Response to Cyber Risk: Evidence from Cybersecurity Related Disclosure.Camélia Radu & Nadia Smaili - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):375-375.
    The initial online publication incorrectly contained Supplementary Information.
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  90.  7
    Not Just a Gender Numbers Game: How Board Gender Diversity Affects Corporate Risk Disclosure.Andreas Seebeck & Julia Vetter - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):395-420.
    This paper examines how board gender diversity affects corporate risk disclosure. We exploit an exogenous shock on firms’ risk environment created by the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union and analyze related risk disclosure in annual reports of public firms in the UK. Using this unique setting, we mitigate concerns about omitted variables in concurrent studies. The findings suggest that board gender diversity is positively related to corporate risk disclosure. However, our results also indicate that the proportion of (...)
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  91.  46
    The Regulatory Dynamics of Sustainable Finance: Paradoxical Success and Limitations of EU Reforms.Hanna Ahlström & David Monciardini - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):193-212.
    The financial sector has seen a transformation towards ‘sustainable’ finance particularly in Europe, driven also by unprecedented regulatory reforms. At the same time, many are sceptical about the real impact of these reforms, fearing that they are triggering a paradoxical financialisation of sustainability. Building on recent research on institutional logics and institutional fields formation, we examine changes in the EU regulatory dynamics as characterised by shifts in framing the relationship between sustainability and finance. Deploying a longitudinal approach, consisting of archival (...)
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  92.  1
    On the Ethics of “Non-Corporate” Insider Trading.Benjamin M. Blau, Todd G. Griffith & Ryan J. Whitby - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):79-93.
    The ethical considerations of insider trading have been widely debated in the academic literature :171–182, 1990). In 2013, the STOCK Act, which was initially passed to mitigate insider trading by government officials, was quickly and unexpectedly amended to allow certain government employees to withhold their financial information. To identify and quantify the potential costs placed on investors by non-corporate insider traders, we use the unusual circumstances surrounding this amendment. For a sample of stocks most held by members of Congress, we (...)
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  93.  4
    Contaminated Heart: Does Air Pollution Harm Business Ethics? Evidence From Earnings Manipulation.Charles H. Cho, Zhongwei Huang, Siyi Liu & Daoguang Yang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):151-172.
    We investigate whether air pollution harms business ethics from the perspective of earnings manipulation, which exerts a real effect on the economy and social welfare. Using a large sample and a comprehensive air quality index in China, we find that firms located in cities with more severe air pollution exhibit higher levels of discretionary accruals and are more likely to restate their financial statements, consistent with exposure to air pollution leading to more earnings manipulation. We further provide causal evidence using (...)
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  94.  7
    Reimagining the Future of Technology: “The Social Dilemma” Review.Shuili Du - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):213-215.
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  95.  7
    Leadership and Character(s): Behavioral Business Ethics in ‘War and Peace’.Christopher Michaelson - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):31-47.
    Leo Tolstoy was on to behavioral ethics before there was such as a thing as behavioral ethics. Three scenes from his magnum opus, War and Peace, demonstrate that Tolstoy diagnosed some of the same problems that occupy modern behavioral ethics: confirmation bias, slippery-slope reasoning, and illusions of control. However, whereas modern behavioral ethics has done more to diagnose problems than to prescribe solutions, Tolstoy’s theories of moral psychology and leadership provide direction for human moral self-cultivation. This analysis of War and (...)
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  96.  2
    Economic Peace as a Counterpoint to the Warfare Economy: Rethinking Individual and Collective Responsibility.Fiona Ottaviani & Dominique Steiler - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):19-29.
    The idea of economic peace is a “counterpoint” to a warlike view of the economy. Viewing things in terms of economic peace makes it possible to develop a different economic anthropology. The idea of economic peace is used to think about a fundamental revision of the relationships to self and between actors. It sits at the intersection of peace studies, social and cognitive psychology, institutional conventionalist approaches, postmodernist philosophy and sinology. By employing the inchoate concept of economic peace, this article (...)
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  97.  4
    The Prisoner’s Dilemma: An Adequate Concept for Ethical Analysis in Healthcare? A Systematic Search and Critical Review.Wolf Rogowski & Oliver Lange - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):63-77.
    Schools of economic ethics inspired by Buchanan propose viewing ethical conflicts as prisoners’ dilemmas to facilitate solutions based on Pareto-improving institutional changes. Given that healthcare is determined by complex institutional arrangements, it has been claimed that this approach is also suitable for business ethics in healthcare. To scrutinize this claim, this research systematically searched for studies reporting PD structures in healthcare. PubMed, EconLit, and EconBiz were searched to find articles in German and English. Study type, characteristics of the game, and (...)
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  98.  3
    Moral Reactions to Bribery Are Fundamentally Different for Managers Witnessing and Managers Committing Such Acts: Tests of Cognitive-Emotional Explanations of Bribery.Ekta Sharma & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):95-124.
    We investigate how paying a bribe or refusing a bribe differs between observing others doing this or committing such acts oneself. Study 1 examines how and when observing others paying a bribe or refusing a bribe leads to actions opposing bribery or supporting anti-bribery. The how question is answered by showing that positive and negative emotions mediate such responses; the when question is answered by demonstrating that empathy and the social self-concept constitute personal conditions for regulating such effects. Study 2 (...)
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  99. On the Analogy Between Business and Sport: Towards an Aristotelian Response to The Market Failures Approach to Business Ethics.Matthew Sinnicks - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):49-61.
    This paper explores the notion that business calls for an adversarial ethic, akin to that of sport. On this view, because of their competitive structure, both sport and business call for behaviours that are contrary to ‘ordinary morality’, and yet are ultimately justified because of the goods they facilitate. I develop three objections to this analogy. Firstly, there is an important qualitative difference between harms risked voluntarily and harms risked involuntarily. Secondly, the goods achieved by adversarial relationships in sport go (...)
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  100.  4
    Does A Virtuous Circle Really Exist? Revisiting the Causal Linkage Between CSP and CFP.Xiaoping Zhao & Audrey Murrell - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (1):173-192.
    Previous studies have proposed a virtuous circle between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance. However, a key challenge researchers face when empirically examining this virtuous circle is endogeneity. In this paper, we apply a well-developed method—dynamic panel data estimation—to account for endogeneity and conduct two studies to reexamine the causal relationship between CSP and CFP. Study 1 relies on KLD ratings from 1997 to 2012 as the measure of CSP. According to the results of Study 1, although CFP measured (...)
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  101.  13
    Do Boards Take Environmental, Social, and Governance Issues Seriously? Evidence From Media Coverage and CEO Dismissals.Jenna J. Burke - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):647-671.
    This study empirically investigates the dismissal of U.S. CEOs following negative media coverage of environmental, social, and governance practices. Extending related literature on the media, ESG, and CEO dismissal, I develop a theoretical framework that considers the media as an influential third party that forms and reflects public opinion about ESG issues. In this role, the media reduces information asymmetry by providing cues on their relative salience and prompting corporate directors to attribute firm-level ESG issues to the CEO, regardless of (...)
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  102.  21
    Milking It for All It’s Worth: Unpalatable Practices, Dairy Cows and Veterinary Work?Caroline Clarke & David Knights - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):673-688.
    Viewing animals as a disposable resource is by no means novel, but does milking the cow for all its worth now represent a previously unimaginable level of exploitation? New technology has intensified milk production fourfold over the last 50 years, rendering the cow vulnerable to various and frequent clinical interventions deemed necessary to meet the demands for dairy products. A major question is whether or not the veterinary code of practice fits, or is in ethical tension, with the administration of (...)
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  103.  3
    Leader and Organizational Behavioral Integrity and Follower Behavioral Outcomes: The Role of Identification Processes.Ziya Ete, Olga Epitropaki, Qin Zhou & Les Graham - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):741-760.
    This paper investigates the concept of behavioral integrity from three important foci in organizational settings: i.e., leader, organization, and follower. Drawing from theories of behavioral integrity, social learning, and social identity, we examine the effects of leader and organizational behavioral integrity on follower behavioral integrity and organizational citizenship behavior via follower identification with leader and with organization, respectively. To test our hypotheses, we used data from three studies. Studies 1 and 2 were online experiments in which behavioral integrity was manipulated (...)
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  104. Do Evaluative Pressures and Group Identification Cultivate Competitive Orientations and Cynical Attitudes Among Academics?Tobias Johansson - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):761-780.
    This article theorizes and analyzes how two aspects of the increasing accountingization of academia in the form of evaluative pressures and group identification, independently and interactively, work to cultivate academics’ self-interest for their social interactions with the scientific community, forming them to adopt more competitive orientations and cynical attitudes. Using data of a large number of faculty members from the 17 universities in Sweden, it is shown that evaluative pressures and group identification perceived by academics jointly reinforce each other in (...)
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  105.  5
    Innovating for Good in Opportunistic Contexts: The Case for Firms’ Environmental Divergence.Dante I. Leyva-de la Hiz, J. Alberto Aragon-Correa & Andrew G. Earle - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):705-721.
    Opportunistic behaviors are considered ethically and strategically troublesome since they disrupt otherwise mutually beneficial relationships. Previous literature has shown that firms attempt to protect their investments from opportunism by generating a large amount of patented marginal innovations in domains central to their industry. However, this approach may generate some ethical dilemmas by preventing firms and societies from more radical, collaborative, and much-needed environmental progress. We extend the environmental innovation literature using strategic and ethical lenses to analyze the potential of an (...)
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  106.  11
    Extracting Legitimacy: An Analysis of Corporate Responses to Accusations of Human Rights Abuses.Rajiv Maher, Moritz Neumann & Mette Slot Lykke - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):609-628.
    We ask what type of neutralization techniques corporations apply to allegations of human rights abuses. We proceed by undertaking a Qualitative Content Analysis of 162 responses by ten extractives-sector firms over a period of 14 years. The firms were responding to accusations of human rights impacts documented by the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre. We use Garrett et al.’s :507–520, 1989) framework of neutralization techniques consisting of denial, justification, concession and excuse to examine the responses. During our QCA, we (...)
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  107.  4
    How Corporate Charitable Giving Reduces the Costs of Formal Controls.Bernhard E. Reichert & Matthias Sohn - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):689-704.
    Formal control systems are a common instrument to align employees’ interests with those of managers and companies. However, research shows that employees perceive formal controls as a sign of distrust and restraint, which can lead to costs of control in the form of lower employee cooperation and effort. We propose that charitable giving reduces these costs of control. We draw on the halo effect and propose that corporate charitable giving alters employees’ perception of and reaction to formal controls. In a (...)
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  108.  3
    Hiding in the Crowd: Government Dependence on Firms, Management Costs of Political Legitimacy, and Modest Imitation.Yi Xiang, Ming Jia & Zhe Zhang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):629-646.
    Although previous studies primarily claim that government-dependent firms can actively engage in compliance activities in order to achieve political legitimacy, access government resources, and build competitive advantages, these studies largely ignore how firms react when firm-dependent governments exert coercive pressures. We thus introduce institutional theory and the behavioral theory of social performance to develop a model of modest imitation, and we propose that the more governments depend on privately owned firms, the more firms demonstrate average social performance in order to (...)
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  109.  8
    ERP Study of Liberals’ and Conservatives’ Moral Reasoning Processes: Evidence from South Korea.Jin Ho Yun, Yaeri Kim & Eun-Ju Lee - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):723-739.
    Do liberals’ and conservatives’ brain processes differ in moral reasoning? This research explains these groups’ dissimilar moral stances when they face ethical transgressions in business. Research that explores the effects of ideological asymmetry on moral reasoning processes through moral foundations has been limited. We hypothesize two different moral reasoning processes and test them in the South Korean culture. Study 1 uses the neuroscientific method of event-related potentials to explore the dissociable neural mechanisms that underlie Korean liberals’ and conservatives’ moral reasoning (...)
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  110.  3
    Correction to: Which Privacy Policy Works, Privacy Assurance or Personalization Declaration? An Investigation of Privacy Policies and Privacy Concerns.Fue Zeng, Qing Ye, Zhilin Yang, Jing Li & Yiping Amy Song - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):799-799.
    The initial online publication contained a typesetting mistake in the author information. The original article has been corrected.
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  111.  3
    Which Privacy Policy Works, Privacy Assurance or Personalization Declaration? An Investigation of Privacy Policies and Privacy Concerns.Fue Zeng, Qing Ye, Zhilin Yang, Jing Li & Yiping Amy Song - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):781-798.
    This study focuses on two specific privacy policies, namely privacy assurance and personalization declaration. Specifically, we investigate how these distinct privacy policies affect customers’ privacy concerns and subsequent purchase responses. We have developed a conceptual model that addresses the independent effects of privacy assurance and personalization declaration, as well as the mechanism of these effects. Our model is grounded in motivation theory and supported by a field experiment and a controlled experiment. Our study demonstrates that privacy assurance that claims security (...)
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  112.  8
    Individuals’ Perceptions of the Legitimacy of Emerging Market Multinationals: Ethical Foundations and Construct Validation.Jianhong Zhang, David L. Deephouse, Désirée van Gorp & Haico Ebbers - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):801-825.
    Entry of new organizations, including multinational enterprises from emerging markets, raises the ethical question of will they benefit society. The concept of legitimacy answers this question because it is the overall assessment of the appropriateness of organizational ends and means. Moreover, gaining legitimacy enables EMNEs to succeed in new host countries. Past work examined collective level indicators of the legitimacy of MNEs, but recent research recognizes the importance of individuals’ perceptions as the micro-foundation of legitimacy. This study first uses new (...)
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  113.  53
    The Illusion of Merit and the Demons of Economic Meritocracy: Which are the Legitimate Expectations of the Market?Luigino Bruni & Paolo Santori - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):415-427.
    Meritocracy is gaining momentum in public discourse, being close to the determinants of people’s demand of social justice. Conversely, in Academia meritocracy is the object of harsh critiques. The meritocratic rhetoric brings people to overlook the factors which contributed to their success over their individual actions, legitimating socioeconomic inequalities. Recently, it has been argued that market-driven societies foster the problems related to meritocracy. The concept of merit, conceived as the value of the individual contribution to the common good of society, (...)
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  114. Quaker Business Ethics as MacIntyrean Tradition.Nicholas Burton & Matthew Sinnicks - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):507-518.
    This paper argues that Quaker business ethics can be understood as a MacIntyrean tradition. To do so, it draws on three key MacIntyrean concepts: community, compartmentalisation, and the critique of management. The emphasis in Quaker business ethics on finding unity, as well as the emphasis that Quaker businesses have placed on serving their local areas, accords with MacIntyre’s claim that small-scale community is essential to human flourishing. The emphasis on integrity in Quaker business ethics means practitioners are well-placed to resist (...)
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  115.  2
    Consequentialist Motives for Punishment Signal Trustworthiness.Nathan A. Dhaliwal, Daniel P. Skarlicki, JoAndrea Hoegg & Michael A. Daniels - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):451-466.
    Upholding cooperative norms via punishment is of central importance in organizations. But what effect does punishing have on the reputation of the punisher? Although previous research shows third parties can garner reputational benefits for punishing transgressors who violate social norms, we proposed that such reputational benefits can vary based on the perceived motive for the punishment. In Studies 1 and 2, we found that individuals who endorsed a consequentialist motive for punishing were seen as more trustworthy. In Study 3, the (...)
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  116.  2
    Exploring the Nexus Between Work-to-Family Conflict, Material Rewards Parenting and Adolescent Materialism: Evidence from Chinese Dual-Career Families.Yanping Gong, Xiuyuan Tang, Julan Xie & Long Zhang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):593-607.
    As a social issue of widespread concern, work-to-family conflict has been found to adversely affect employees’ work and family lives. The current research linked employees’ work-to-family conflict to disruptions in parenting and in turn to adolescents’ materialism. In Study 1, two-wave data from 207 Chinese dual-career families that included an adolescent in junior high school showed that both men’s and women’s work-to-family conflict was positively correlated with material rewards parenting, and this positive relationship was stronger when parenting daughters than sons. (...)
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  117.  3
    Is Machiavellianism Dead or Dormant? The Perils of Researching a Secretive Construct.Daniel N. Jones & Steven M. Mueller - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):535-549.
    Machiavellianism is a popular construct in research on ethics and organizational behavior. This research has demonstrated that Machiavellianism predicts a host of counterproductive, deviant, and unethical behaviors. However, individuals high in Machiavellianism also adapt to their organizational surroundings, engaging in unethical behavior only in certain situations. Nevertheless, the utility of Machiavellianism has been questioned. Meta-analyses have demonstrated that psychopathy out-predicts Machiavellianism for most antisocial outcomes. Thus, many researchers assume Machiavellianism is a derivative and redundant construct. However, researchers examining the utility (...)
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  118.  13
    “It’s Just Business”: Understanding How Business Frames Differ from Ethical Frames and the Effect on Unethical Behavior.McKenzie R. Rees, Ann E. Tenbrunsel & Kristina A. Diekmann - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):429-449.
    Unfortunately, business is often associated with unethical behavior. While research has offered a number of explanations for why business might encourage unethical behavior, we argue that how a person frames a situation may provide important insight. Drawing on the decision frame literature, the goal of the current research is to identify the differences in cognitive processing associated with two decision frames dominant in the business ethics literature—business and ethical—and, with that knowledge, examine ways to mitigate the detrimental influence of frame (...)
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  119. Is Interpersonal Guanxi Beneficial in Fostering Interfirm Trust? The Contingent Effect of Institutional- and Individual-Level Characteristics.Lu Shen, Kevin Zheng Zhou & Chuang Zhang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):575-592.
    Despite the prevalent role of guanxi in conducting business in Chinese, it is unclear whether interpersonal guanxi fosters interfirm trust. Taking a contingency approach, this study examines how institutional and individual factors moderate the association between interpersonal guanxi and interfirm trust. Based on a paired survey between salespersons and sales managers and two secondary datasets, this study finds that interpersonal guanxi is positively associated with interfirm trust. Moreover, this positive effect is stronger when firms operate in regions with strong government–market (...)
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  120.  8
    Measuring Ethical Organizational Culture: Validation of the Spanish Version of the Shortened Corporate Ethical Virtues Model.Juliana Toro-Arias, Pablo Ruiz-Palomino & María del Pilar Rodríguez-Córdoba - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):551-574.
    A key issue in the business ethics field is the design of effective measures for assessing the ethical culture of organizations. The Corporate Ethical Virtues Model, developed by Kaptein in 2008, is an instrument for measuring ethical culture, and has been applied, adapted and validated in different contexts. In 2013, DeBode, Armenakis, Field and Walker developed the CEV–S, a shortened version of the original scale. Both the CEV and CEV–S assess eight dimensions based on corporate ethical virtues: clarity, congruency of (...)
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  121.  3
    Correction To: The Inhibitory Effect of Political Conservatism on Consumption: The Case of Fair Trade.Thomas Usslepp, Sandra Awanis, Margaret K. Hogg & Ahmad Daryanto - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):533-533.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-021-04780-w.
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  122.  7
    Religious Values Motivating CSR: An Empirical Study from Corporate Leaders’ Perspective.Bo Xu & Linlin Ma - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (3):487-505.
    Using a panel data of 806 U.S. firms from 2006 to 2015, we find that in their ratings of corporate social responsibility performance, firms with top managers who attended religiously affiliated schools outperform their peers with no such managers. The positive relationship between religious school attendance and CSR performance is stronger among firms with lower level of community religiosity or less external monitoring. Our findings lend support to early theoretical work that suggests managerial CSR-oriented values can be key motivating factors (...)
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  123.  17
    The Influence of Political Regime on State-Level Disciplinary Actions of CPAs Sanctioned by the PCAOB.Abdullah Al-Moshaigeh, Denise Dickins & Julia L. Higgs - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):325-340.
    We investigate whether enforcement is influenced by politics by comparing the severity of PCAOB sanctions of individual CPAs to the severity of related state-level disciplinary actions imposed by boards of accountancy. Our results provide evidence that when responding to PCAOB sanctions, BOAs under Republican regimes impose less severe penalties than do BOAs under Democratic regimes. Our data and analyses inform the regulatory and enforcement practices of the accounting profession and other professions. Most directly, motivated by improvements in technology that facilitate (...)
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  124.  5
    The Role of Political Prudence and Political Skill in the Political Will and Political Behavior Relationship.Okechukwu Ethelbert Amah - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):341-355.
    The corporate scandals of the twenty-first century have necessitated ethical behavior as a major component of the organizational process. These scandals occurred despite the ethical rules and laws in place, implying that rules and laws might not be effective in ensuring the ethical behavior of organizational participants at all times. Hence, a better approach to handling ethical decisions may be virtue ethics which demand the building of ethical character that intrinsically drives ethical behavior. Prudence was studied as a virtue which (...)
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  125.  5
    Place Matters: (Dis)embeddedness and Child Labourers’ Experiences of Depersonalized Bullying in Indian Bt Cottonseed Global Production Networks.Premilla D’Cruz, Ernesto Noronha, Muneeb Ul Lateef Banday & Saikat Chakraborty - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):241-263.
    Engaging Polanyi’s embeddedness–disembeddedness framework, this study explored the work experiences of Bhil children employed in Indian Bt cottonseed GPNs. The innovative visual technique of drawings followed by interviews was used. Migrant children, working under debt bondage, underwent greater exploitation and perennial and severe depersonalized bullying, indicative of commodification of labour and disembeddedness. In contrast, children working in their home villages were not under debt bondage and underwent less exploitation and occasional and mild depersonalized bullying, indicative of how civil society organizations, (...)
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  126.  12
    Business Ethics and Quantification: Towards an Ethics of Numbers.Gazi Islam - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):195-211.
    Social practices of quantification, or the production and communication of numbers, have been recognized as important foundations of organizational knowledge, as well as sources of power. With the advent of increasingly sophisticated digital tools to capture and extract numerical data from social life, however, there is a pressing need to understand the ethical stakes of quantification. The current study examines quantification from an ethical lens, to frame and promote a research agenda around the ethics of quantification. After a brief overview (...)
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  127.  9
    Cultural Diversity and Corporate Tax Avoidance: Evidence From Chinese Private Enterprises.Guangyong Lei, Wanwan Wang, Junli Yu & Kam C. Chan - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):357-379.
    We examine the impact of a city’s cultural diversity on a firm’s tax avoidance. Our findings suggest that when a firm is located in a culturally diverse city, it exhibits less TA than a firm located in a less culturally diverse city. The findings are robust to alternative metrics of cultural diversity and TA and after accounting for omitted sample bias and endogeneity. Additional analysis suggests that the negative impact of cultural diversity on a firm’s TA is more salient in (...)
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  128.  4
    Escaping the Fantasy Land of Freedom in Organizations: The Contribution of Hannah Arendt.Yuliya Shymko & Sandrine Frémeaux - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):213-226.
    This article examines why and how workers adhere and contribute to the perpetuation of the freedom fantasy induced by neoliberal ideology. We turn to Hannah Arendt’s analysis of the human condition, which offers invaluable insights into the mechanisms that foster the erosion of human freedom in the workplace. Embracing an Arendtian lens, we demonstrate that individuals become entrapped in a libertarian fantasy—a condition enacted by the replacement of the freedom to act by the freedom to perform. The latter embodies the (...)
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  129.  4
    How do Expatriate Managers Draw the Boundaries of Moral Free Space in the Case of Guanxi?Tolga Ulusemre & Xin Fang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):311-324.
    This paper explores expatriates’ ethical evaluations of and responses to guanxi in China through the lens of integrative social contracts theory. We conducted in-depth interviews with 14 expatriate managers who had spent, on average, 6.5 years working and living in China. Based on the content analysis of these interviews, we identified two different uses of guanxi: defensive and competitive. In general, the respondents found defensive guanxi moral in the Chinese context, while they considered competitive guanxi immoral. Based on our findings, (...)
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  130.  6
    The Joint Effect of Ethical Idealism and Trait Skepticism on Auditors’ Fraud Detection.Inez G. F. Verwey & Stephen K. Asare - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):381-395.
    Although regulators have identified ethical lapses as a key factor contributing to auditors’ failure to detect their clients’ fraudulent financial reporting, research using ethical theory to examine auditors’ fraud detection remains limited. We provide evidence on the joint effect of ethical idealism and trait skepticism on auditors’ fraud judgments. Ethical idealism reflects an individual’s concern for the welfare of others while trait skepticism reflects an individual’s disposition to validating a proposition. Forsyth theorizes that there is an association between ethical idealism (...)
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  131.  7
    Legitimacy and Cosmopolitanism: Online Public Debates on (Corporate) Responsibility.Anne Vestergaard & Julie Uldam - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):227-240.
    Social media platforms have been vested with hope for their potential to enable ‘ordinary citizens’ to make their judgments public and contribute to pluralized discussions about organizations and their perceived legitimacy :60–97, 2018). This raises questions about how ordinary citizens make judgements and voice them in online spaces. This paper addresses these questions by examining how Western citizens ascribe responsibility and action in relation to corporate misconduct. Empirically, it focuses on modern slavery and analyses online debates in Denmark on child (...)
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  132.  24
    Should You Buy Local?Carson Young - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):265-281.
    Buying local is a prominent form of ethical consumption. We commonly assume that products that are local are in some respect ethically superior to ones that are not. This article contributes to research on local food by scrutinizing this assumption in light of some central values of the locavore movement. It identifies four central ethical causes from prior literature on locavorism: protecting the environment, promoting community, promoting small business, and contributing to the prosperity of one’s local economy. It then analyzes (...)
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  133.  14
    Hometown Ties and Favoritism in Chinese Corporations: Evidence From CEO Dismissals and Corporate Social Responsibility.Hongjin Zhu, Yue Pan, Jiaping Qiu & Jinli Xiao - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):283-310.
    This paper provides a systematic analysis of how hometown ties, the most common and distinct bases for interpersonal ties to build upon in China, could influence corporate governance in Chinese corporations by focusing on its impact on CEO dismissals and corporate social responsibility. We find that hometown ties between CEOs and board chairs reduce the likelihood of CEO dismissals and that the negative relationship between firm performance and CEO dismissals is weaker for hometown-connected CEOs in locally administered state-owned enterprises, for (...)
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  134.  6
    Team Over-Empowerment in Market Research: A Virtue-Based Ethics Approach.Terry R. Adler, Thomas G. Pittz, Hank B. Strevel, Dina Denney, Susan D. Steiner & Elizabeth S. Adler - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):159-173.
    Few scholars have investigated the considerations of over-empowered teams from a non-consequential ethics approach. Leveraging a virtue-based ethics lens of team empowerment, we provide a framework of team ethical orientation and over-empowerment using highly influential market research teams as a basis for our analysis. The purpose of this research is to contrast how teams founded on virtue-based ethics can attenuate ethical dilemmas and negative organizational outcomes from team over-empowerment. We provide a framework of four conditions that include Sophisticated, Suppressed, Contagion, (...)
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  135.  3
    No Strings Attached? Potential Effects of External Funding on Freedom of Research.René Chester Goduscheit - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):1-15.
    Universities are increasingly pushed to apply for external funding for their research and incentivised for making an impact in the society surrounding them. The consequences of these third-mission activities for the degree of freedom of the research, the potential to make a substantial research contribution and the ethical challenges of this increased dependency on external funding are often neglected. The implications of external sponsorship of research depend on the level of influence of the sponsor in the various elements of the (...)
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  136.  1
    Responsible Management Education as Socialization: Business Students’ Values, Attitudes and Intentions.Debbie Haski-Leventhal, Mehrdokht Pournader & Jennifer S. A. Leigh - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):17-35.
    The growing interest in sustainable development in all sectors of the economy has fostered a noteworthy shift toward responsible management education. This emerging view underscores that business schools provide students with more than just managerial knowledge as they also develop students toward responsible management. Based on socialization theory, we show how this development occurs by studying RME as a process that relates to students’ values, attitudes and behavioral intentions. With data from a large international survey of business students from 21 (...)
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  137.  5
    Can Corporate Ethics Programs Reduce Unethical Behavior? Threat Appraisal or Coping Appraisal.Taslima Jannat, Syed Shah Alam, Yi-Hui Ho, Nor Asiah Omar & Chieh-Yu Lin - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):37-53.
    While a corporate ethics program is expected to reduce employees’ unethical behavior, understanding the effects of the ethics program elements on reducing the unethical behavior is a crucial issue. This study aims to explore how a corporate ethics program with multiple control elements, including punishment, monitoring, internal reporting, code of ethics, ethics support service and ethics training, influence employees’ threat appraisal process, coping appraisal process and unethical behavior at workplaces. The data to verify proposed research hypotheses were collected by administering (...)
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  138.  6
    Effects of Organizational Embeddedness on Unethical Pro-Organizational Behavior: Roles of Perceived Status and Ethical Leadership.Junghyun Lee, Se-Hyung Oh & Sanghee Park - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):111-125.
    This study examines why individuals who are deeply embedded in the organization may engage in unethical pro-organizational behavior. Drawing from social identity theory and self-affirmation theory, we propose that deeply embedded employees may engage in UPB as a way of promoting or maintaining their status in the organization. We further propose that this positive relationship between organizational embeddedness and UPB, mediated through status perceptions, is stronger for employees working under managers who display low levels of ethical leadership. Using data gathered (...)
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  139.  5
    A Newcomer Socialization Perspective on the Proliferation of Unethical Conduct in Organizations: The Influences of Peer Coaching Practices and Newcomers’ Goal Orientations.Xiangmin Liu, Rebecca L. Greenbaum, David Allen & Zhengtang Zhang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):73-88.
    Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we contribute to the behavioral ethics literature by examining how and why organizational socialization processes can affect newcomers’ adoption of unethical behaviors. Specifically, we contend that quality peer coaching provides newcomers with enhanced self-resources that diminishes emotional exhaustion and thus indirectly reduces newcomer unethical conduct. Conversely, peer coach unethical conduct increases newcomers’ emotional exhaustion, and thus indirectly increases newcomers’ own unethical acts. Our research also identifies newcomers’ goal orientations as important individual differences that moderate (...)
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  140.  6
    Keeping Teams Together: How Ethical Leadership Moderates the Effects of Performance on Team Efficacy and Social Integration.Sean R. Martin, Kyle J. Emich, Elizabeth J. McClean & Col Todd Woodruff - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):127-139.
    Prior research has demonstrated a strong relationship between team performance and team members’ team efficacy beliefs and perceptions of social integration. Performing well increases the feelings of collective ability that comprise team efficacy and the feelings of psychological connectedness that make up social integration, while performing poorly erodes them. In this article, we draw from the social cognitive base of ethical leadership theory to argue that ethical leadership moderates the relationship between team performance and team efficacy beliefs, and between team (...)
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  141.  6
    A New Understanding of Marketing and “Doing Good”: Marketing’s Power in the TMT and Corporate Social Responsibility.Wenbin Sun & Rahul Govind - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):89-109.
    The traditional understanding of corporate social responsibility has largely been focused on its downstream performance implications, particularly its associations with firms’ customer market metrics such as customer loyalty, customer satisfaction and customer co-creation as well as financial ones such as firm value, return on assets etc. However, given the close relationship between CSR and marketing that literature has identified, it is surprising that the relationship between a focal upstream construct, i.e. the marketing function’s power within a firm and the firm’s (...)
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  142.  8
    A Moral Cleansing Process: How and When Does Unethical Pro-organizational Behavior Increase Prohibitive and Promotive Voice.Ying Wang, Shufeng Xiao & Run Ren - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):175-193.
    In this study, we draw on moral cleansing theory to investigate the consequence of unethical pro-organizational behavior from the perspective of the actors. Specifically, we hypothesize that after conducting UPB, people may feel guilty and tend to cleanse their wrongdoings by providing suggestions or identifying problems at work. We further hypothesize that the above relationship is moderated by the actor’s moral identity symbolization. We conducted three studies, including experiment and surveys, to test our hypotheses. Results of these studies show consistent (...)
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  143.  10
    Multilevel Examination of How and When Socially Responsible Human Resource Management Improves the Well-Being of Employees.Zhe Zhang, Juan Wang & Ming Jia - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):55-71.
    Although empirical evidence has shown that socially responsible human resource management practices positively influence employees’ outcomes, knowledge on the social impact of SRHRM practices on employee well-being has been limited. Drawing upon the social information processing theory and attribution theory, we investigate whether, how, and when SRHRM practices increase the well-being of employees. Using multiphase and multilevel data from 474 employees in 50 companies, we find that SRHRM practices positively predict employee well-being and that the relationship is mediated by employees’ (...)
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  144. Autonomy and Manipulation: Refining the Argument Against Persuasive Advertising.Timothy Aylsworth - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):689-699.
    Critics of persuasive advertising argue that it undermines the autonomy of consumers by manipulating their desires in morally problematic ways. My aim is this paper is to refine that argument by employing a conception of autonomy that is not at odds with certain forms of manipulation. I argue that the charge of manipulation is not sufficient for condemning persuasive advertising. On my view, manipulation of an agent’s desires through advertising is justifiable in cases where the agent accepts the process through (...)
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  145.  5
    The Ethicality of Point-of-Sale Marketing Campaigns: Normative Ethics Applied to Cause-Related Checkout Charities.Jay L. Caulfield, Catharyn A. Baird & Felissa K. Lee - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):799-814.
    “Would you like to contribute to XYZ charity by adding a dollar to your bill today?” Point-of-sale campaigns for fundraising are common to grocery stores, pharmacies, restaurants and warehouse clubs. Commonly referred to as ‘checkout charity,’ these fundraisers have generated over $4.1 billion in contributions for nonprofits over the past three decades. Yet little research has focused on the ethicality of this type of campaign. To address this need, we analyze the issue using behavioral ethics and normative theory. We consider (...)
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  146.  6
    Building Projects on the Local Communities’ Planet: Studying Organizations’ Care-Giving Approaches.Roya Derakhshan - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):721-740.
    This study examines local communities’ lived experiences and organizations’ care-giving processes regarding four oil and gas projects deployed in three countries. Analyzing the empirical data through the lens of ethics of care reveals that, together with mature justice, the inclination to care conceived at the focal organization creates an ethical culture encouraging caring activities by individuals at the local level. Through close communications with communities, project decision makers at the local level recognize the demanded care of local communities and develop (...)
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  147.  4
    Locality Stereotype, CEO Trustworthiness and Stock Price Crash Risk: Evidence from China.Leilei Gu, Jinyu Liu & Yuchao Peng - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):773-797.
    Exploring the locality stereotype with respect to CEO’s trustworthiness, we find that firms whose CEOs are from more reputable hometowns have a higher likelihood of stock price crashes, indicating the presence of a CEO “Trust Exploitation” effect, i.e. a high-trust identity does not guarantee managerial ethics; to the contrary, it could tempt CEOs to abuse outsiders’ trust, camouflage their misconducts and conceal adverse information more severely. The effect of CEO’s perceived trustworthiness on tail risk of stock price remains robust when (...)
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  148.  2
    Debating Ethics or Risks? An Exploratory Study of Audit Partners’ Peer Consultations About Ethics.Mouna Hazgui & Marion Brivot - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):741-758.
    This qualitative field study is based on interviews with 20 experienced audit partners in France and documents the dialogical dimension of ethical deliberation in auditing. We ask: do audit partners consult each other when faced with an ethical dilemma at work? Who among their peers do they prefer to consult and why? Our analysis provides evidence that audit partners do not deliberate alone, contrary to what psychological experimental research on audit ethics usually postulates. When faced with an uncertain situation in (...)
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  149.  8
    How Much You See Is How You Respond: The Curvilinear Relationship Between the Frequency of Observed Unethical Behavior and The Whistleblowing Intention.Muel Kaptein - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):857-875.
    This article uses a sample of 3076 employees working in the USA to examine the relationship between the frequency of unethical behavior that employees observe in their organization and their intention to whistleblow. The results confirm the expected curvilinear relationship based on the Focus Theory of Normative Conduct. This relationship is a combination of a diminishing negative relationship between the frequency of observed unethical behavior and the intention to whistleblow internally and a linear positive relationship between the frequency of observed (...)
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  150.  8
    Accumulative vs. Appreciative Expressions of Materialism: Revising Materialism in Light of Polish Simplifiers and New Materialism.Justyna Kramarczyk & Mathieu Alemany Oliver - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):701-719.
    At a time when it is critically important to preserve natural resources and reduce the amount of man-made pollution, this article explores other potentials for materialism in today’s market economies. Based on a two-year ethnography in Poland, we learn from simplifiers who denounce current materialism—while remaining inside the market—about what materialism could potentially become. Our study shows that materialism can take on other less studied but more eco-friendly expressions. In particular, we highlight an alternate expression of materialism, which we call (...)
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  151.  11
    Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Its Marketing: Emergent Ethical and Public Policy Implications.Alexander Nill & Gene Laczniak - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):669-688.
    This paper provides a marketing ethics analysis that addresses the practice of selling genetic tests directly to the consumer. It details the complexity of this emergent sector by articulating the panoply of evolving ethical/social questions raised by this development. It advances the conversation about DTC genetic testing by reviewing the business and healthcare literature concerning this topic and by laying out the inherent ethical complications for consumers, marketers, and regulators. It also points to several possible public and company policy adjustments. (...)
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  152.  5
    Is There a Trade-Off Between Accrual-Based and Real Earnings Management Activities in the Presence of (fe) Male Auditors?Andrews Owusu, Alaa Mansour Zalata, Kamil Omoteso & Ahmed A. Elamer - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):815-836.
    Prior research suggests that the presence of high-quality auditors constrains accrual-based earnings management, but it inadvertently leads to higher real activities manipulation. We investigate whether such trade-off exists between accrual-based and real earnings management activities in the presence of female or male auditors. We use a sample of UK firms for the period 2009 to 2016 and find that firms audited by female auditors do not resort to a higher-level real activities manipulation when their ability to engage in accruals management (...)
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  153.  25
    CEO Pay and the Argument From Peer Comparison.Joakim Sandberg & Alexander Andersson - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):759-771.
    Chief executive officers are typically paid great amounts of money in wages and bonuses by commercial companies. This is sometimes defended with an argument from peer comparison; roughly that “our” CEO has to be paid in accordance with what other CEOs at comparable companies get. At first glance this seems like a poor excuse for morally outrageous pay schemes and, consequently, the argument has been ignored in the previous philosophical literature. In contrast, however, this article provides a partial defence of (...)
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  154.  15
    Effect of CSR and Ethical Practices on Sustainable Competitive Performance: A Case of Emerging Markets From Stakeholder Theory Perspective.Abdul Waheed & Qingyu Zhang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):837-855.
    An extensive work has been done on corporate social responsibly practices that mainly emphasized the larger firms within developed nations. Nonetheless, still work is needed to observe the importance of CSRPs’ and ethical cultural practices in terms of sustainable competitive performance that garnered far less attention by the existing literature. This study explores the impact of CSRPs on SACP with the mediating role of ECL from SMEs of two emerging nations, i.e., China and Pakistan based on stakeholders’ theory and practices. (...)
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  155.  4
    The Case for Ethical Non-Compete Agreements: Executives Versus Sandwich-Makers.Lauren E. Aydinliyim - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (3):651-668.
    Human capital, the knowledge, skills, and abilities of employees, can be a powerful driver of firm performance, yet the mobility of human capital raises questions over how to protect it. Employee non-compete agreements, which limit an employee’s ability to start or join a rival firm, have received recent attention. While past research considers whether non-competes are effective tools at limiting employee mobility, few have considered if non-competes should be used. Filling this gap, I propose a normative schema for when employee (...)
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  156.  5
    Cure or Sell: How Do Pharmaceutical Industry Marketers Combine Their Dual Mission? An Approach Using Moral Dissonance.Bénédicte Bourcier-Béquaert, Loréa Baïada-Hirèche & Anne Sachet-Milliat - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (3):555-581.
    Pharmaceutical industry marketers are confronted with specific ethical issues linked to the tension between the economic interest being pursued and the health mission of this sector. Indeed this dual mission could be problematic for them when the two objectives contradict each other. We use the concept of moral dissonance to examine how marketers in the pharmaceutical industry perceive the profit/health tension inherent in their sector and how they deal with it. Based on narratives of 18 marketers working in the pharmaceutical (...)
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  157.  3
    Corporate Social Responsibility and NGO Directors on Boards.Shili Chen, Niels Hermes & Reggy Hooghiemstra - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (3):625-649.
    In the years 2009 to 2016, approximately 35% of Standard & Poor’s 500 firms had at least one director with a professional background in private, not-for-profit organizations. Yet research provides little guidance on what kind of firms are more likely to have NGO directors on their boards, neither do we know these directors’ effects on firm strategic outcomes. Our study examines the above two questions in the context of corporate social responsibility, taking the lens of resource dependence theory. Results from (...)
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  158.  3
    Moral Recovery and Ethical Leadership.John G. Cullen - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (3):485-497.
    Research on ethical leadership generally falls into two categories: one celebrates individual leaders and their ‘authentic’ personalities and virtuous stewardship of organizations; the other decries toxic leaders or individuals in positions of power who exhibit ‘dark’ personality traits or dubious morals. Somewhere between these extremes, leadership is ‘done’ by imperfect human beings who try to avoid violating their own ethical standards while at the same time navigating the realities of social and organizational life. This paper discusses the concept of ‘Moral (...)
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  159.  6
    How Unbecoming of You: Online Experiments Uncovering Gender Biases in Perceptions of Ridesharing Performance.Brad Greenwood, Idris Adjerid, Corey M. Angst & Nathan L. Meikle - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (3):499-518.
    Gender discrimination continues to plague organizations. While the advent of the Internet and the digitization of commerce have provided both a mechanism by which goods and services can be exchanged, as well as an efficient way for consumers to voice their opinions about retailers, recent work has begun to uncover significant biases that manifest during the review process. In particular, it has been suggested that the gig-economy’s elimination of previously anonymous arm’s-length transactions may re-introduce bias into perceptions of quality. In (...)
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  160.  5
    Fear and Violence as Organizational Strategies: The Possibility of a Derridean Lens to Analyze Extra-judicial Police Violence.Srinath Jagannathan, Rajnish Rai & Christophe Jaffrelot - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (3):465-484.
    Governments and majoritarian political formations often present police violence as nationalist media spectacles, which marginalize the rights of the accused and normalize the discourse of majoritarian nationalism. In this study, we explore the public discourse of how the State and political actors repeatedly labeled a college-going student Ishrat Jahan, who died in a stage-managed police killing in India in 2004, as a terrorist. We draw from Derrida’s ethics of unconditional hospitality to show that while police violence is aimed at constructing (...)
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  161.  7
    Arguing to Defeat: Eristic Argumentation and Irrationality in Resolving Moral Concerns.Rasim Serdar Kurdoglu & Nüfer Yasin Ateş - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (3):519-535.
    By synthesizing the argumentation theory of new rhetoric with research on heuristics and motivated reasoning, we develop a conceptual view of argumentation based on reasoning motivations that sheds new light on the morality of decision-making. Accordingly, we propose that reasoning in eristic argumentation is motivated by psychological or material gains that do not depend on resolving the problem in question truthfully. Contrary to heuristic argumentation, in which disputants genuinely argue to reach a practically rational solution, eristic argumentation aims to defeat (...)
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  162.  7
    Socratic Ignorance and Business Ethics.Santiago Mejia - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (3):537-553.
    Socrates’ inquiry into the nature of the virtues and human excellence led him to experience Socratic ignorance, a practical puzzlement experienced by his recognition that his central life commitments were conceptually problematic. This practical perplexity was not, however, an epistemic weakness but a reflection of his wisdom. I argue that Socratic ignorance, a concept that has not received scholarly attention in business ethics, is a central aim that business practitioners should seek. It is what a truthful, thorough, and courageous inquiry (...)
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  163.  5
    Factors Affecting the Effectiveness of Cause-Related Marketing: A Meta-Analysis.Xiaojun Fan, Nianqi Deng, Yi Qian & Xuebing Dong - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (2):339-360.
    In its three decades of development, many constructs of cause-related marketing have been tested from different perspectives and in varied contexts. However, there has not yet been an integrated empirical study. Reviewing 162 studies from 117 articles, we constructed a framework of meta-analysis and identified 20 constructs. Among these, 13 are antecedents that can be grouped into three components: consumer-related traits, execution-related factors, and product-related traits, while three mediators and four consequences are used to measure the effectiveness of cause-related marketing. (...)
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  164.  9
    Disobeying Orders’ as Responsible Leadership: Revisiting Churchill, Percival and the Fall of Singapore.Amy L. Fraher - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (2):247-263.
    In many organizations, subsidiary performance goals are developed remotely by optimistic leaders back at headquarters, leaving deployed managers vulnerable to unrealistic operational expectations on the frontline, unable to follow orders. Most management research categorizes employees’ failure to follow workplace directives as deviant behavior. In contrast, I argue that in some circumstances ‘disobeying orders’ should be considered a virtuous, responsible leadership strategy when facing unachievable tasks. Through a historical analysis of the surrender of the British colony Singapore to Japan during World (...)
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  165.  4
    Allegations of Sexual Misconduct: A View from the Observation Deck of Power Distance Belief.Shalini Sarin Jain & Joon Sung Lee - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (2):391-410.
    We seek to understand how third-party observers respond to allegations of sexual transgressions, whether their responses vary and if so why, how they determine perpetrator sanctions, who is more forgiving of them, and what is the psychological mechanism underlying this preference. We draw on one dimension of Hofstede's theory of cultural orientations—power distance belief, and one dimension of Haidt's work on moral reasoning—moral decoupling. Results from three studies on recent real-life cases—those pertaining to Harvey Weinstein, Brett Kavanaugh, and Peter Martins—reveal (...)
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  166.  4
    Correction to: Allegations of Sexual Misconduct: A View from the Observation Deck of Power Distance Belief.Shalini Sarin Jain & Joon Sung Lee - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (2):411-411.
    The initial online publication contained a typesetting mistake. The original article has been corrected.
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  167.  3
    Treat Floating People Fairly: How Compensation Equity and Multilevel Social Exclusion Influence Prosocial Behavior Among China’s Floating Population.Yidong Tu, Ying Zhang, Yongkang Yang & Shengfeng Lu - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (2):323-338.
    The hundreds of millions of floating people in China who leave their hometown for a new city to improve their standard of living constitute an important phenomenon, but as yet the ethical predicaments they face, such as low compensation equity and high social exclusion, have attracted little attention. With a national sample of 125,626 floating people in China, this study investigated how and when compensation equity influences prosocial behavior through the lens of justice theory. This study found that floating people’s (...)
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  168.  5
    Competing Logics in the Islamic Funds Industry: A Market Logic Versus a Religious Logic.Khaled O. Alotaibi, Christine Helliar & Nongnuch Tantisantiwong - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):207-230.
    In contrast to the conventional fund management industry with a profit-oriented logic based on risk and return, ethical and faith-based funds should follow the religious principles of their investment-style philosophy. Islamic funds should obey the theological teachings of the primary sources of Islam, the Quran and Sunnah, as stakeholders expect these religious teachings to influence the investment decisions of fund managers. In practice, Islamic fund managers use Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions ’s screening criteria, based on secondary (...)
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  169.  3
    Trust Erosion During Industry-Wide Crises: The Central Role of Consumer Legitimacy Judgement.Shijiao Chen, Jing A. Zhang, Hongzhi Gao, Zhilin Yang & Damien Mather - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):95-116.
    Widespread unethical corporate misconduct in an industry triggers industry-wide crises. This research investigates how industry misconduct affects consumers’ trust in the industry, by incorporating insights from a micro-level psychological aspect of institutions. The conceptual framework proposes that consumer legitimacy judgement lies at the core of industry trust, following an industry-wide crisis. The results demonstrate that perception of normalisation of misconduct affects industry trust through consumer legitimacy judgement. Moreover, the PNM-CLJ-industry trust relationship is stronger during industry-wide crises compared with crises that (...)
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  170.  6
    The Metrics of Ethics and the Ethics of Metrics.Gazi Islam & Michelle Greenwood - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):1-5.
    Metrics shape our social worlds in many and more ways. Everyday quantifications of our preferences, our behaviors and our relationships, alter us and the institutions that we constitute. This essay takes a brief look at the metrics of business ethics through two analytic devices. Representation explains the notion that metrics can capture or demonstrate ethics and performativity explains the notion that metrics can shape or constitute ethics. The analytic distinction between representation and performativity is obscured in practice when metrics become (...)
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  171.  3
    A Configurational Analysis of the Causes of Consumer Indirect Misbehaviors in Access-Based Consumption.Xiao-Ling Jin, Zhongyun Zhou & Yiwei Tian - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):135-166.
    Consumer indirect misbehavior in access-based consumption is a significant challenge for enterprises. The literature is in short of a deep understanding of the antecedent conditions of consumer indirect misbehavior in this context and limited by inconsistent findings, calling for developing a holistic and integrative theoretical framework. This study integrates three commonly used theoretical perspectives in the consumer misbehavior literature to present holistic archetypes of consumer indirect misbehavior formation. In accordance with this theoretical objective, we adopted an emerging approach for configurational (...)
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  172.  4
    Correction to: Highway to (Digital) Surveillance: When Are Clients Coerced to Share Their Data with Insurers?Michele Loi, Christian Hauser & Markus Christen - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):21-21.
    The initial online publication contained a typesetting mistake in the author information. The original article has been corrected.
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  173.  19
    Highway to (Digital) Surveillance: When Are Clients Coerced to Share Their Data with Insurers?Michele Loi, Christian Hauser & Markus Christen - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):7-19.
    Clients may feel trapped into sharing their private digital data with insurance companies to get a desired insurance product or premium. However, private insurance must collect some data to offer products and premiums appropriate to the client’s level of risk. This situation creates tension between the value of privacy and common insurance business practice. We argue for three main claims: first, coercion to share private data with insurers is pro tanto wrong because it violates the autonomous choice of a privacy-valuing (...)
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  174.  16
    Stakeholder Engagement, Knowledge Problems and Ethical Challenges.J. Robert Mitchell, Ronald K. Mitchell, Richard A. Hunt, David M. Townsend & Jae H. Lee - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):75-94.
    In the management and business ethics literatures, stakeholder engagement has been demonstrated to lead to more ethical management practices. However, there may be limits on the extent to which stakeholder engagement can, as currently conceptualized, resolve some of the more difficult ethical challenges faced by managers. In this paper we argue that stakeholder engagement, when seen as a way of reducing five types of knowledge problems—risk, ambiguity, complexity, equivocality, and a priori irreducible uncertainty—can aid managers in resolving such ethical challenges. (...)
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  175.  4
    Just Look at the Numbers: A Case Study on Quantification in Corporate Environmental Disclosures.Janne T. Järvinen, Matias Laine, Timo Hyvönen & Hannele Kantola - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):23-44.
    This paper sheds further light on the role of quantification in corporate environmental disclosures. Quantification is an inherently social practice, which has attracted a fair amount of academic interest in recent years. At the same time, in the field of social and environmental accounting there is a paucity of research on quantification or the role it plays for organisations, for organisational communication and in societies more broadly. Accordingly, in this paper, we will draw on a qualitative case study to discuss (...)
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