Conceptual transformations

Sociological Theory 13 (2):163-177 (1995)
Abstract
Are the words in our natural language which we use to speak about natural and social phenomena actually laden with preexisting (and hence corrigible) theoretical commitments, full-blown "ontologies," or even metaphysics? Or can we appeal to rules for their use in adjudicating the sense (or otherwise) of any scientific or philosophical innovation? These questions arise most commonly in the context of claims about scientific "transformations," especially "scientific revolutions." Cognitive science, for example, announces such a "revolution" in its conceptualizations of the true nature of the "mind," "thought," "intelligence," "understanding," and so on. In this paper I shall argue that Wittgenstein's reflections on "grammar" enable us to dissolve many of the perplexities that confront us when we invoke Kuhnian "incommensurability" in distinguishing between genuine scientific revolutions and pseudo-revolutions. Indeed, the Kuhnian thesis itself is seen to depend on a range of contestable claims about "words" and "meanings."
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.2307/202159
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history
Request removal from index
Download options
Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 28,165
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles
Paradigm Shifts, Scientific Revolutions, and the Unit of Scientific Change: Towards a Post-Kuhnian Theory of Types of Scientific Development.Paul C. L. Tang - 1984 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:125 - 136.
Review Essay: Scientific Revolutions Revisited.S. Perovic - 2010 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (3):523-529.
Did a Scientific Revolution Occur in Linguistics?Morton E. Winston - 1976 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1976:25-33.
The Challenge of Scientific Revolutions: Van Fraassen's and Friedman's Responses.Vasso Kindi - 2011 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (4):327-349.
Intuitionism as a (Failed) Kuhnian Revolution in Mathematics.B. Pourciau - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (2):297-329.

Monthly downloads

Added to index

2009-01-28

Total downloads

100 ( #50,981 of 2,172,022 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

1 ( #325,967 of 2,172,022 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.

Other forums