Teaching Philosophy 32 (1):1-40 (2009)

Authors
Toby Handfield
Monash University
Abstract
Peer Instruction is a simple and effective technique you can use to make lectures more interactive, more engaging, and more effective learning experiences. Although well known in science and mathematics, the technique appears to be little known in the humanities. In this paper, we explain how Peer Instruction can be applied in philosophy lectures. We report the results from our own experience of using Peer Instruction in undergraduate courses in philosophy, formal logic, and critical thinking. We have consistently found it to be a highly effective method of improving the lecture experience for both students and the lecturer
Keywords Philosophical pedagogy  Peer instruction  Teaching Critical thinking  Teaching Logic
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ISBN(s) 0145-5788
DOI 10.5840/teachphil20093212
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Philosophy Discussions With Less B.S.Neil Thomason - 1995 - Teaching Philosophy 18 (1):15-30.

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