Teaching Philosophy

ISSN: 0145-5788

35 found

View year:

  1.  4
    Ensuring Genuine Assessment in Philosophy Education.Lillian M. King Abadal - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):255-277.
    In this article, I will outline an assessment model that allows instructors to continuing assigning term papers and argumentative papers without compromising the authenticity of student assessment. This path forward relies upon a pseudo flipped classroom model in which students will complete a scaffolded term paper through a series of in-class assessments that build upon previously completed components. The final steps of completing this assignment will require producing a draft and final version of a traditional term paper outside of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  25
    Introduction to the Special Issue - LLMs and Writing.Syed Abumusab - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):139-142.
  3.  17
    ChatGPT and the Writing of Philosophical Essays.Markus Bohlmann & Annika M. Berger - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):233-253.
    Text-generative AI-systems have become important semantic agents with ChatGPT. We conducted a series of experiments to learn what teachers’ conceptions of text-generative AI are in relation to philosophical texts. In our main experiment, using mixed methods, we had twenty-four high school students write philosophical essays, which we then randomized to essays with the same command from ChatGPT. We had ten prospective teachers assess these essays. They were able to tell whether it was an AI or student essay with 78.7 percent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  3
    On Disinformation: How to Fight for Truth and Protect Democracy, by Lee C. McIntyre.Bill Bolin - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):279-281.
  5.  3
    Traditionalism: The Radical Project for Restoring Sacred Order, by Mark Sedgwick.Thorsten Botz-Borstein - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):282-286.
  6.  3
    Grading for Growth: A Guide to Alternative Grading Practices that Promote Authentic Learning and Student Engagement in Higher Education, by David Clark and Robert Talbert.Dennis Earl - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):286-292.
  7.  2
    The Bioethics of Space Exploration, by Konrad Szocik.Steven J. Firth - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):292-296.
  8.  7
    Immaterial: Rules in Contemporary Art, by Sherri Irvin.Alper Güngör - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):296-300.
  9.  4
    Free Will and Human Agency: 50 Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Thought Experiments, by Garrett Pendergraft.Petur O. Jonsson - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):300-305.
  10.  8
    Student Voices on GPT-3, Writing Assignments, and the Future College Classroom.Bada Kim, Sarah Robins & Jihui Huang - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):213-231.
    This paper presents a summary and discussion of an assignment that asked students about the impact of Large Language Models on their college education. Our analysis summarizes students’ perception of GPT-3, categorizes their proposals for modifying college courses, and identifies their stated values about their college education. Furthermore, this analysis provides a baseline for tracking students’ attitudes toward LLMs and contributes to the conversation on student perceptions of the relationship between writing and philosophy.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  5
    Theory of Categories: Key Instruments of Human Understanding, by Patrick Grim and Nicolas Rescher.John Kinsey - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):305-307.
  12.  3
    The New College Classroom, by Cathy Davidson and Christina Katopodis.Andrew P. Mills - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):308-312.
  13.  9
    Don’t Believe the Hype.Benjamin Mitchell-Yellin - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):193-211.
    This paper argues that the threat Large Language Models (LLMs), such as ChatGPT, pose to writing instruction is both not entirely new and a welcome disruption to the way writing instruction is typically delivered. This new technology seems to be prompting many instructors to question whether essay responses to paper prompts reflect students’ own thinking and learning. This uneasiness is long overdue, and the hope is it leads instructors to explore evidence-based best practices familiar from the scholarship of teaching and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  46
    Writing with ChatGPT.Ricky Mouser - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):173-191.
    Many instructors see the use of LLMs like ChatGPT on course assignments as a straightforward case of cheating, and try hard to prevent their students from doing so by including new warnings of consequences on their syllabi, turning to iffy plagiarism detectors, or scheduling exams to occur in-class. And the use of LLMs probably is cheating, given the sorts of assignments we are used to giving and the sorts of skills we take ourselves to be instilling in our students. But (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  3
    Warren Zevon and Philosophy: Beyond Reptile Wisdom, edited by John E. MacKinnon.John Schlachter - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):312-316.
  16. Reviving the Philosophical Dialogue with Large Language Models.Robert Smithson & Adam Zweber - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):143-171.
    Many philosophers have argued that large language models (LLMs) subvert the traditional undergraduate philosophy paper. For the enthusiastic, LLMs merely subvert the traditional idea that students ought to write philosophy papers “entirely on their own.” For the more pessimistic, LLMs merely facilitate plagiarism. We believe that these controversies neglect a more basic crisis. We argue that, because one can, with minimal philosophical effort, use LLMs to produce outputs that at least “look like” good papers, many students will complete paper assignments (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  44
    Reviving the Philosophical Dialogue with Large Language Models.Robert Smithson & Adam Zweber - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):143-171.
    Many philosophers have argued that large language models (LLMs) subvert the traditional undergraduate philosophy paper. For the enthusiastic, LLMs merely subvert the traditional idea that students ought to write philosophy papers “entirely on their own.” For the more pessimistic, LLMs merely facilitate plagiarism. We believe that these controversies neglect a more basic crisis. We argue that, because one can, with minimal philosophical effort, use LLMs to produce outputs that at least “look like” good papers, many students will complete paper assignments (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  9
    Reviving the Philosophical Dialogue with Large Language Models.Robert Smithson & Adam Zweber - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):143-171.
    Many philosophers have argued that large language models (LLMs) subvert the traditional undergraduate philosophy paper. For the enthusiastic, LLMs merely subvert the traditional idea that students ought to write philosophy papers “entirely on their own.” For the more pessimistic, LLMs merely facilitate plagiarism. We believe that these controversies neglect a more basic crisis. We argue that, because one can, with minimal philosophical effort, use LLMs to produce outputs that at least “look like” good papers, many students will complete paper assignments (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  3
    The Epistemology of Spirit Beliefs, by Hans Van Eyghen.Clint Tibbs - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (2):316-320.
  20.  8
    Practical Bioethics: Ethics for Patients and Providers, by J. K. Miles.Erica Bigelow - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):107-109.
  21.  6
    The Buddha’s Teachings as Philosophy, by Mark Siderits.Henri Cilliers & Kiasha Naidoo - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):110-112.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  9
    Teaching Philosophy during a Pandemic "in the Most Unequal Society in the World".Yolandi M. Coetser & Jacqueline Batchelor - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):1-21.
    According to the World Bank, South Africa is the most unequal society in the world. It follows that teaching philosophy takes on a unique character in this country. During the initial COVID-19 outbreak, all universities were compelled to move online, entailing that the teaching of philosophy also moved online. However, because of their socio-economic realities, students faced many barriers, and this served to further marginalise already marginalised students. The university campus provides structural support to many of these students that they (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  5
    Being Good in a World of Need, by Larry Temkin.Samuel Duncan - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):112-116.
  24.  2
    Tenacious Beasts: Wildlife Recoveries That Change How We Think about Animals, by Christopher J. Preston.Robert Earle - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):116-119.
  25.  11
    Modern Moral Philosophy: From Grotius to Kant, by Stephen Darwall.Jacob D. Hogan - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):119-122.
  26.  13
    Not Up For Debate.Justin Horn - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):23-32.
    Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl is a debate-style activity that aims to help students cultivate skills of moral deliberation. While a fair amount has been written about the pedagogical benefits of Ethics Bowl, relatively little attention has been given to potential ethical criticisms of the activity. In this paper I present some reflections on an ethical challenge to Ethics Bowl, namely that applying the characteristic approach of Ethics Bowl to some issues of contemporary ethical controversy can be immoral. The concern is that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  6
    Logical Methods, by Greg Restall and Shawn Standefer. [REVIEW]Jeremiah Joven Joaquin - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):122-126.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  5
    The Logic of Actual Innocence.Jeff Mitchell - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):33-47.
    The article features an analytic protocol for examining controversial criminal cases in critical thinking courses. The rubric has been designed to be useful to busy critical thinking teachers who wish to draw on student interest in true crime. Six guidelines are presented that are intended to provide the instructor with a convenient scheme for quickly and easily framing classroom discussions. Due to their generality, the guidelines can be readily applied to a wide-range of cases, giving educators a high degree of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  5
    Philosophy of Science and the Kyoto School: An Introduction to Nishida Kitaro, Tanabe Hajime and Tosaka Jun, by Dean Anthony Brink.Isadora Monteiro - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):126-128.
  30.  10
    Examining Monuments.Elizabeth Scarbrough - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):49-67.
    How can philosophers incorporate the Digital Humanities into their classrooms? And why should they? In this paper, I explore answers to these questions as I detail what I have dubbed “The Monuments Project'' and describe how this project engages with Digital Humanities and teaches students to connect theoretical philosophical concepts with their lives. Briefly, the Monuments Project asks students to apply concepts discussed in our philosophy class (in my case, a Global Aesthetics class) with a monument in their environment. Instead (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  7
    Choosing Freedom: A Kantian Guide to Life, by Karen Stohr.Edward H. Spence - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):129-131.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  8
    How to Think Like a Philosopher: Twelve Key Principles for More Humane, Balanced, and Rational Thinking, by Julian Baggini.Eugene C. Tibbs - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):132-135.
  33. Logic for the Field of Battle.Cheng-Chih Tsai - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):69-93.
    The truth table method, natural deduction, and the truth tree method, the three validity proving methods standardly taught in an introductory logic course, are too clumsy for the battlefield of real-life. The “short truth table” test is handy at times, but it stumbles at many other times. In this paper, we set up a general method that can beat all the methods mentioned above in a contest of speed. Furthermore, the procedure can be step-by-step paraphrased in a natural language, so (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  15
    Mixing and Matching Deductive and Non-deductive Arguments.Spencer K. Wertz - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):95-106.
    This essay is basically divided into two parts. The first deals with the similarities between reductio ad absurdum arguments and slippery slope arguments. The chief example comes from Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan, which advances an argument for the necessity of government for humane living. The second addresses some pedagogical concerns centered around another pair of arguments: the argument by complete enumeration and the argument by inductive generalization. The illustration for this pair comes from the arts. I finish with a suggestion that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  12
    Mind Design III: Philosophy, Psychology, and Artificial Intelligence, edited by John Haugeland, Carl F. Craver, and Colin Klein.Furkan Yazıcı - 2024 - Teaching Philosophy 47 (1):136-138.
 Previous issues
  
Next issues