Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):985-1010 (2014)

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Abstract
Modern philosophy recognizes two major ethical theories: deontology, which encourages adherence to rules and fulfillment of duties or obligations; and consequentialism, which evaluates morally significant actions strictly on the basis of their actual or anticipated outcomes. Both involve the systematic application of universal abstract principles, reflecting the culturally dominant paradigm of technical rationality. Professional societies promulgate codes of ethics with which engineers are expected to comply, while courts and the public generally assign liability to engineers primarily in accordance with the results of their work, whether intended or unintended. A third option, prominent in ancient philosophy, has reemerged recently: virtue ethics, which recognizes that sensitivity to context and practical judgment are indispensable in particular concrete situations, and therefore rightly focuses on the person who acts, rather than the action itself. Beneficial character traits—i.e., virtues—are identified within a specific social practice in light of the internal goods that are unique to it. This paper proposes a comprehensive framework for implementing virtue ethics within engineering
Keywords Engineering ethics  Virtue ethics  Technical rationality  Judgment  Phronesis  Competence  Practice  Social performance  Material well-being  Risk  Responsibility
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DOI 10.1007/s11948-013-9491-y
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References found in this work BETA

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas S. Kuhn - 1962 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals.Immanuel Kant - 1785/2002 - Oxford University Press.
Utilitarianism.John Stuart Mill - 1863 - Cleveland: Cambridge University Press.
After Virtue.A. MacIntyre - 1981 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 46 (1):169-171.

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Citations of this work BETA

Engineers and Active Responsibility.Udo Pesch - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (4):925-939.
Pragmatism and Care in Engineering Ethics.Indira Nair & William M. Bulleit - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (1):65-87.

View all 15 citations / Add more citations

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