To what extent do beliefs affect apparent motion?

Philosophical Psychology 7 (4):471-491 (1994)
Abstract
A number of studies in the apparent motion literature were examined using the cognitive penetrability criterion to determine the extent to which beliefs affect the perception of apparent motion. It was found that the interaction between the perceptual processes mediating apparent motion and higher order processes appears to be limited. In addition, perceptual and inferential beliefs appear to have different effects on perceived motion optimality and direction. Our findings suggest that the system underlying apparent motion perception has more than one stage and is informationally encapsulated from cognitive factors
Keywords Belief  Cognition  Motion  Perception  Psychology  Science
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DOI 10.1080/09515089408573138
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References found in this work BETA
The Logic Of Perception.Irvin Rock - 1983 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
Ways of Worldmaking.Nelson Goodman - 1978 - Harvester Press.
Perception and Cognition.John Heil - 1983 - University of California Press.

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