22 found
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  1.  41
    Censure and Sanctions.Andrew Von Hirsch - 1996 - Oxford University Press UK.
    A number of jurisdictions, including England and Wales after their adoption of the 1991 Criminal Justice Act, require that sentences be `proportionate' to the severity of the crime. This book, written by the leading architect of `just deserts' sentencing theory, discusses how sentences may be scaled proportionately to the gravity of the crime. Topics dealt with include how the idea of a penal censure justifies proportionate sentences; how a penalty scale should be `anchored' to reduce overall punishment levels; how non-custodial (...)
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  2. Censure and Sanctions.Andrew Von Hirsch - 1996 - Law and Philosophy 15 (4):407-415.
     
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  3. Proportionate Sentencing: Exploring the Principles.Andrew Von Hirsch & Andrew Ashworth - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The principle that a sentence should be proportionate to the seriousness of the offence remains at the centre of penal practice and scholarly debate. This volume explores highly topical aspects of proportionality theory that require examination and further analysis. von Hirsch and Ashworth explore the relevance of the principle of proportionality to the sentencing of young offenders, the possible reasons for departing from the principle when sentencing dangerous offenders, and the application of the principle to socially deprived offenders. They examine (...)
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  4. Rethinking the offense principle.A. P. Simester & Andrew von Hirsch - 2002 - Legal Theory 8 (3):269-295.
    This paper explores the Offence Principle. It discusses whether two constraints, additional to the criteria stated in conventional analysis, ought to be met before the Offense Principle can be satisfied: (i) that offensive conduct must be a wrong, and (ii) that the conduct must also lead to harm. The nature of the Harm Principle, and its relationship to the Offense Principle, are also considered. The paper suggests that, even if all cases in which offense should be criminalized also involve harm, (...)
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  5.  12
    Deserved criminal sentences: an overview.Andrew Von Hirsch - 2017 - Portland, Oregon: Hart Publishing.
    Introduction: the emergence of the proportionate sentence -- Sentence proportionality sketched briefly -- Why should the criminal sanction exist? -- Why punish proportionately? -- Ordinal and cardinal proportionality -- Seriousness, severity and the living-standard -- The role of previous convictions -- Proportionate non-custodial sanctions -- A "modified" desert model? -- The politics of the desert model -- Proportionate sentences for juveniles -- Appendix: the desert model's evolution : a brief chronology.
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  6.  48
    Remote Harms and Non-constitutive Crimes.A. P. Simester & Andrew Von Hirsch - 2009 - Criminal Justice Ethics 28 (1):89-107.
    Many of the most serious crimes that fall within the justificatory scope of the harm principle do so constitutively. They do so in the sense that the harm that the crime is designed to prevent is a...
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  7. Extending the Harm Principle:'Remote'Harms and Fair Imputation.Andrew Von Hirsch - 1996 - In A. P. Simester & A. T. H. Smith (eds.), Harm and Culpability. Oxford University Press.
     
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  8. Punishment, penance and the state: A reply to Duff.Andrew Von Hirsch - 2002 - In Derek Matravers & Jonathan Pike (eds.), Debates in Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Anthology. Routledge, in Association with the Open University.
  9.  41
    Direct paternalism: Criminalizing self‐injurious conduct.Andrew Von Hirsch - 2008 - Criminal Justice Ethics 27 (1):25-33.
  10. The crime-preventive impact of penal sanctions.Anthony Bottoms & Andrew von Hirsch - 2010 - In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.
    This article opens with the consequentialist–deontologist debate, with the former concerned about the relevance of punitive measures against their crime reducing potentials, while the latter highlights punishment as censure of wrongful acts and the proportion of the punishment to the degree of crime. The article briefly discusses the empirical research on the impact of penal sanctions and focuses on three main kinds of empirical research into possible general deterrent effects—namely, association studies, quasi-experimental studies, and contextual and perceptual studies. It addresses (...)
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  11. ""The" Desert" Model for Sentencing: Its Influence, Prospects, and Alternatives.Andrew von Hirsch - 2007 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (2):413-434.
    The decline of the rehabilitative ethos in sentencing theory in the post_1960's is a story that has been told often , and need not be rehearsed here. Penal treatment programs, once tested for their effectiveness, showed scant success _ or at most, succeeded only in limited categories of cases. Doubts grew also about the fairness of making the severity of a person's sentence depend upon his responsiveness to treatment. As penal rehabilitation diminished in influence, the key question for penologists and (...)
     
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  12.  26
    Commentary: Criminal record rides again.Andrew von Hirsch - 1991 - Criminal Justice Ethics 10 (2):2-57.
  13.  49
    Should penal rehabilitationism be revived?Andrew von Hirsch & Lisa Maher - 1992 - Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (1):25-30.
  14.  11
    Editor's preface.Andrew Von Hirsch - 1994 - Criminal Justice Ethics 13 (1):3-4.
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  15.  36
    Review essay / lifeboat law.Andrew von Hirsch - 1985 - Criminal Justice Ethics 4 (2):88-94.
    A. W. Brian Simpson, Cannibalism and the Common Law Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1984.
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  16.  23
    Sentencing guidelines and penal aims in Minnesota.Andrew von Hirsch - 1994 - Criminal Justice Ethics 13 (1):39-49.
  17.  35
    Selective incapacitation reexamined: The national academy of sciences' report on criminal careers and “career criminals”.Andrew von Hirsch - 1988 - Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (1):19-35.
    . Selective incapacitation reexamined: The national academy of sciences' report on criminal careers and “career criminals”. Criminal Justice Ethics: Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 19-35.
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  18. The crime-preventive impact of penal sanctions.Anthony Bottoms & Andrew von Hirsch - 2010 - In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford handbook of empirical legal research. Oxford University Press.
     
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  19.  44
    Three conceptions of provocation.Uma Narayan & Andrew von Hirsch - 1996 - Criminal Justice Ethics 15 (1):15-24.
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  20.  33
    Proportionality and desert: A reply to Bedau.Andrew Von Hirsch - 1978 - Journal of Philosophy 75 (11):622-624.
  21.  9
    Responses to Emery.Andrew Von Hirsch - 1998 - Criminal Justice Ethics 17 (1):48-49.
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  22. The "Desert" Model for Sentencing: Its Influence, Prospects, and Alternatives.Andrew von Hirsch - 2007 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 74:413-434.
    The decline of the rehabilitative ethos in sentencing theory in the post_1960's is a story that has been told often, and need not be rehearsed here. Penal treatment programs, once tested for their effectiveness, showed scant success _ or at most, succeeded only in limited categories of cases. Doubts grew also about the fairness of making the severity of a person's sentence depend upon his responsiveness to treatment. As penal rehabilitation diminished in influence, the key question for penologists and reformers (...)
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