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  1.  32
    A Critique of Genealogies.Chin-tai Kim - 1990 - Metaphilosophy 21 (4):391-404.
  2.  32
    A Critique of Kant’s Defense of Theistic Faith.Chin-tai Kim - 1988 - Philosophy Research Archives 14:359-369.
    Kant’s account of the idea of God in the first Critique prefigures but does not imply a theism. It is in his ethical philosophy that this idea is given a theistic interpretation, and that the postulation (or fideic affirmation) of God’s existence, along with immortality, is practically justified as a condition of the possibility of the summum bonum. This paper argues that Kant’s reasoning from his initially austere conception of morality to the summum bonum and to immortality and God’s existence (...)
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  3.  6
    A Critique of Kant’s Defense of Theistic Faith.Chin-tai Kim - 1988 - Philosophy Research Archives 14:359-369.
    Kant’s account of the idea of God in the first Critique prefigures but does not imply a theism. It is in his ethical philosophy that this idea is given a theistic interpretation, and that the postulation of God’s existence, along with immortality, is practically justified as a condition of the possibility of the summum bonum. This paper argues that Kant’s reasoning from his initially austere conception of morality to the summum bonum and to immortality and God’s existence lacks compelling logic. (...)
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  4.  36
    Brentano on the Unity of Mental Phenomena.Chin-Tai Kim - 1978 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 39 (December):199-207.
  5. Cartesian Dualism and the Unity of a Mind.Chin-Tai Kim - 1971 - Mind 80 (July):337-353.
    The author indicates some ways in which cartesian dualists can counter strawson's argument that no cartesian mind can be identified either by itself or by other such minds. Judging the identification argument inconclusive, The author formulates what he regards as a more effective argument against cartesian dualism. The argument is to the effect that cartesian dualism promises no satisfactory account of the unity of a mind. Noting that a cartesian mind is presumed to be the subject of a multiplicity of (...)
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  6.  43
    Husserl and the Egocentric Predicament.Chin-Tai Kim - 1972 - Idealistic Studies 2 (2):116-132.
    In the “Fifth Meditation” of the Cartesian Meditations, Husserl tries to answer the expected objection to his transcendental phenomenology that it commits him to a solipsism. Is his attempt successful? In order to get a proper answer to this question, it is necessary to clarify how he understands the objection. Since he counters the objection by showing how other egos can be “constituted,” it can be said at least that he understands the objection to be the claim that other egos (...)
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  7.  5
    Kant’s “Supreme Principle of Morality”.Chin-tai Kim - 1968 - Kant-Studien 59 (1-4):296-308.
  8. Kant's "Supreme Principle of Morality".Chin-tai Kim - 1968 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 59 (3):296.
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  9. Norms and Freedom.Chin-tai Kim - 1981 - Philosophical Forum 12 (4):311.
     
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  10.  8
    Raymond J. Nelson 1917-1997.Chin-Tai Kim & Colin McLarty - 1997 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71 (2):125 - 126.
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  11. Some Critical Reflections on Kant's Theory of Freedom.Chin-tai Kim - 1971 - Philosophical Forum 2 (4):411.
     
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  12.  3
    The Nature and Possibility of Philosophical Anthropology.Chin-Tai Kim - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 16:58-62.
    Philosophers cannot avoid addressing the question of whether philosophical anthropology is possible. Any answer must be articulated in the context of the nature and function of philosophy. In other words, philosophical anthropology must be defined as an account of the nature of the subject of philosophical thinking. I argue that if philosophical thinkers admit that they are beings in nature, culture, and history, then the possibility of a uniquely philosophical theory of human nature and human phenomenon should be discarded. Rather, (...)
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