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  1.  9
    Phenylbutazone : one drug across two species.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):27.
    In this article we explore the different trajectories of this one drug, phenylbutazone, across two species, humans and horses in the period 1950–2000. The essay begins by following the introduction of the drug into human medicine in the early 1950s. It promised to be a less costly alternative to cortisone, one of the “wonder drugs” of the era, in the treatment of rheumatic conditions. Both drugs appeared to offer symptomatic relief rather than a cure, and did so with the risk (...)
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  2.  3
    Not Only Laboratory to Clinic: The Translational Work of William S. C. Copeman in Rheumatology.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-27.
    Since the arrival of Translational Medicine, as both a term and movement in the late 1990s, it has been associated almost exclusively with attempts to accelerate the “translation” of research-laboratory findings to improve efficacy and outcomes in clinical practice. This framing privileges one source of change in medicine, that from bench-to-bedside. In this article we dig into the history of translation research to identify and discuss three other types of translational work in medicine that can also reshape ideas, practices, institutions, (...)
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  3.  14
    Julie Fairman;, Joan E. Lynaugh. Critical Care Nursing: A History. Foreword by Gladys M. Campbell and Barbara Siebelt. 175 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Toon - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):785-786.
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    The Tool and the Job: Digital Humanities Methods and the Future of the History of the Human Sciences.Elizabeth Toon - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (1):83-98.
    This article, based on a presentation at the Future of the History of the Human Sciences workshop, discusses some of the potential benefits and pitfalls of digital humanities tools and approaches for historians of the human sciences. It reviews some of the major approaches that form DH and draws on the author’s experience as part of a team creating a large DH resource to consider the complications presented by these.
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    Correction to: Special issue—before translational medicine: laboratory clinic relations lost in translation? Cortisone and the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Britain, 1950–1960.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-1.
    The above-mentioned article has been published online on 7 November 2019 as part of topical collection ‘Before Translational Medicine: Laboratory Clinic Relations’.
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    Special issue—before translational medicine: laboratory clinic relations lost in translation? Cortisone and the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Britain, 1950–1960.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-22.
    Cortisone, initially known as ‘compound E’ was the medical sensation of the late 1940s and early 1950s. As early as April 1949, only a week after Philip Hench and colleagues first described the potential of ‘compound E’ at a Mayo Clinic seminar, the New York Times reported the drug’s promise as a ‘modern miracle’ in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Given its high profile, it is unsurprising that historians of medicine have been attracted to study the innovation of cortisone. It (...)
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    Special Issue—Before Translational Medicine: Laboratory Clinic Relations Lost in Translation? Cortisone and the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Britain, 1950–1960.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):54.
    Cortisone, initially known as ‘compound E’ was the medical sensation of the late 1940s and early 1950s. As early as April 1949, only a week after Philip Hench and colleagues first described the potential of ‘compound E’ at a Mayo Clinic seminar, the New York Times reported the drug’s promise as a ‘modern miracle’ in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Given its high profile, it is unsurprising that historians of medicine have been attracted to study the innovation of cortisone. It (...)
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  8. Correction To: Special Issue—Before Translational Medicine: Laboratory Clinic Relations Lost in Translation? Cortisone and the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Britain, 1950–1960.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1.
    The above-mentioned article has been published online on 7 November 2019 as part of topical collection ‘_Before Translational Medicine: Laboratory Clinic Relations_’.
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  9. Special issue—before translational medicine: laboratory clinic relations lost in translation? Cortisone and the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Britain, 1950–1960.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-22.
    Cortisone, initially known as ‘compound E’ was the medical sensation of the late 1940s and early 1950s. As early as April 1949, only a week after Philip Hench and colleagues first described the potential of ‘compound E’ at a Mayo Clinic seminar, the New York Times reported the drug’s promise as a ‘modern miracle’ in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Given its high profile, it is unsurprising that historians of medicine have been attracted to study the innovation of cortisone. It (...)
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