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  1.  16
    Trees and Family Trees in the Aeneid.Emily Gowers - 2011 - Classical Antiquity 30 (1):87-118.
    Tree-chopping in the Aeneid has long been seen as a disturbingly violent symbol of the Trojans' colonization of Italy. The paper proposes a new reading of the poem which sees Aeneas as progressive extirpator not just of foreign rivals but also of his own Trojan relatives. Although the Romans had no family “trees” as such, their genealogical stemmata had “branches” and “stock”, and their vocabulary of family relationships takes many of its metaphors from planting, adoption, and uprooting, while plant life (...)
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  2.  21
    Virgil’s Sibyl and the ‘Many Mouths’ Cliché.Emily Gowers - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (01):170-182.
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  3. A Cat May Look at a King : Differences and Indifference in Horace, Satire 6.Emily Gowers - 2009 - In Gianpaolo Urso (ed.), Ordine E Sovversione Nel Mondo Greco E Romano: Atti Del Convegno Internazionale, Cividale Del Friuli, 25-27 Settembre 2008. ETS.
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  4.  21
    Dangerous Sailing: Valerius Maximus and the Suppression of Sextus Pompeius.Emily Gowers - 2010 - Classical Quarterly 60 (2):446-449.
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  5.  12
    Knight's Moves: The Son-in-Law in Cicero and Tacitus.Emily Gowers - 2019 - Classical Antiquity 38 (1):2-35.
    While the relationship between fathers and sons, real or metaphorical, is still a dominant paradigm among classicists, this paper considers the rival contribution of Roman sons-in-law to the processes of collaboration and succession. It discusses the tensions, constraints, and obligations that soceri – generi relationships involved, then claims a significant role for sons-in-law in literary production. A new category is proposed here: “son-in-law literature,” with texts offered as recompense for a wife or her dowry, or as substitute funeral orations. Cicero (...)
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