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Esme G. Murdock
San Diego State University
  1.  13
    Unsettling Reconciliation: Decolonial Methods for Transforming Social-Ecological Systems.Esme G. Murdock - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (5):513-533.
    'Political reconciliation' refers to processes for establishing right relations between groups that are emerging from a history coloured by violent relations. However, dominant Western, euro-descendent philosophies of political reconciliation rarely focus on ecological forms of harm or consider practices of ecological violence as constitutive of the violent relations that reconciliation hopes to repair. This article argues that the exclusion of ecological dimensions of harm from dominant Western models of political reconciliation is one way of understanding Indigenous claims of dissatisfaction with (...)
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  2.  5
    Why Epistemic Decolonization?Pascah Mungwini, Aaron Creller, Michael J. Monahan & Esme G. Murdock - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 4 (2):70-105.
    Why decolonize knowledge and philosophy? Pascah Mungwini proposes that epistemic decolonization should be implemented to remain true to the spirit of philosophy and to the idea of humanity. Aaron Creller, Michael Monahan, and Esme Murdock focus on different aspects of Mungwini’s proposal in their individual responses. Creller suggests some “best practices” so that comparative epistemology can take into account the parochial embeddedness of universal reason. While Monahan underscores that world philosophy as a project must openly acknowledge its own incompleteness and (...)
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    This Land Was Made for … : Appearing Black/Brown Female Corporeality, Life, and Death.Esme G. Murdock - forthcoming - Hypatia:1-14.
    Lands and bodies are often conceptualized as exhaustible objects and property within settler-colonial and neoliberal ideologies. These conceptualizations lead to underdevelopment of understandings of lands and bodies that fall outside of these ascriptions, and also attempt to actively obscure the pervasive ways in which settler colonialism violently reinscribes itself on the North American landscape through the murder and disappearance of Black and Brown women's bodies. In this article, I will argue that the continual murder and disappearance of Black and Brown (...)
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    Whose Justice is It Anyway? Mitigating the Tensions Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty.Samantha Noll & Esme G. Murdock - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (1):1-14.
    This paper explores the tensions between two disparate approaches to addressing hunger worldwide: Food security and food sovereignty. Food security generally focuses on ensuring that people have economic and physical access to safe and nutritious food, while food sovereignty movements prioritize the right of people and communities to determine their agricultural policies and food cultures. As food sovereignty movements grew out of critiques of food security initiatives, they are often framed as conflicting approaches within the wider literature. This paper explores (...)
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    Storied with Land: ‘Transitional Justice’ on Indigenous Lands.Esme G. Murdock - 2018 - Journal of Global Ethics 14 (2):232-239.
    Transitional justice is positioned as an emergent discourse to grapple with the aim, and subsequent practices, of moving societies mired in violent political relations to more stable, democratic political relations. Increasingly, precepts of transitional justice are being applied to political reconciliatory processes in so- called liberal democratic states. This article examines limitations to transitional justice paradigms especially when applied to Indigenous-state reconciliatory processes by centering Indigenous scholarly discourse critical of both transitional justice and reconciliation processes that position Indigenous peoples, Indigenous (...)
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  6. Whose Justice is it Anyway? Mitigating the Tensions Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty.Samantha Noll & Esme G. Murdock - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (1):1-14.
    This paper explores the tensions between two disparate approaches to addressing hunger worldwide: Food security and food sovereignty. Food security generally focuses on ensuring that people have economic and physical access to safe and nutritious food, while food sovereignty movements prioritize the right of people and communities to determine their agricultural policies and food cultures. As food sovereignty movements grew out of critiques of food security initiatives, they are often framed as conflicting approaches within the wider literature. This paper explores (...)
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