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  1. The Problem of Public Shaming☆.Harrison Frye - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  2. Democratic Reciprocity.Andreas Schedler - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (2):252-278.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  3. In Public Reason, Diversity Trumps Coherence.Kevin Vallier & Ryan Muldoon - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (2):211-230.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  4. Why Size Matters: Property‐Owning Democracy, Liberal Socialism, and the Firm.John Wilesmith - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (2):231-251.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  5. Deliberation and Discussion in Classical Athens.Daniela Cammack - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (2):135-166.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  6. Gentrification and Domination.Daniel Putnam - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (2):167-187.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  7. Interrogation and Torture: Integrating Efficacy with Law and Morality, Steven J. Barela, Mark Fallon, Gloria Gaggioli, and Jens David Ohlin, Eds. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2020), 624 Pp., Cloth $99, eBook $79.99. [REVIEW]Mark Berlin - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):159-161.
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  8. Rethinking the Nature of States and Political Violence.Adam Henschke - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):145-158.
    It is a long-held belief that states must retain the monopoly over political violence in order to be states, and to survive. However, there are recent criticisms of this view forcing us to consider not just the state's use of political violence but the very nature of the state. Elizabeth Frazer and Kimberly Hutchings's Can Political Violence Ever Be Justified? argues that it cannot. Ned Dobos's Ethics, Security, and the War-Machine raises a series of arguments against states having standing militaries, (...)
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  9. COVID-19 as a Mass Death Event.Yuna Han, Katharine M. Millar & Martin J. Bayly - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):5-17.
    As of the first week of February 2021, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in over two million people dead across the globe. This essay argues that in order to fully understand the politics arising from the COVID-19 pandemic, we need to focus on the individual and collective experiences of death, loss, and grief. While the emerging scholarly discourse on the pandemic, particularly in political science and international relations, typically considers death only in terms of its effects on formal state-level politics (...)
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  10. Resources for the People—but Who Are the People? Mistaken Nationalism in Resource Sovereignty.Christopher Kutz - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):119-144.
    Arguments about the ownership of natural resources have focused on the claims of cosmopolitans, who urge an equality of global claims to resources, and resource sovereigntists, who argue that national peoples are the proper owners of their resources. This focus is mistaken: Whatever one believes about the in-principle claims of the global community, there remains the practical question of how the national surplus is to be distributed. And in addressing this question, we must look at a distinction heretofore ignored in (...)
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  11. The Neglected North Korean Crisis: Women's Rights.Sea Young Kim & Leif-Eric Easley - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):19-29.
    North Korea references gender equality in its socialist constitution, but the de facto social and legal circumstances that women face in the country are far below the de jure status they are purported to enjoy. North Korean women endure extremely low public health standards and pervasive harassment. Yet their growing market power and social influence are underestimated. Women account for the majority of North Korean border crossers, and their informal economic activities are supporting families while modernizing the economy. This essay (...)
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  12. Food System Transformation and the Role of Gene Technology: An Ethical Analysis.Paul B. Thompson - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):35-49.
    The global food system exhibits dizzying complexity, with interaction among social, economic, biological, and technological factors. Opposition to the first generation of plants and animals transformed through rDNA-enabled gene transfer has been a signature episode in resistance to the forces of industrialization and globalization in the food system. Yet agricultural scientists continue to tout gene technology as an essential component in meeting future global food needs. An ethical analysis of the debate over gene technologies reveals the details that matter. On (...)
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  13. Arguments for Well-Regulated Capitalism, and Implications for Global Ethics, Food, Environment, Climate Change, and Beyond.Mark Budolfson - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):83-98.
    Discourse on food ethics often advocates the anti-capitalist idea that we need less capitalism, less growth, and less globalization if we want to make the world a better and more equitable place. This idea is also familiar from much discourse in global ethics, environment, and political theory, more generally. However, many experts argue that this anti-capitalist idea is not supported by reason and argument, and is actually wrong. As part of the roundtable, “Ethics and the Future of the Global Food (...)
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  14. The Consequences of National Humiliation, Joslyn Barnhart (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2020), 270 Pp., Cloth $47.95, eBook $23.99. [REVIEW]Paul Saurette - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):164-167.
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  15. Nourishing Humanity Without Destroying the Planet.Anne Barnhill & Jessica Fanzo - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):69-81.
    As part of the roundtable, “Ethics and the Future of the Global Food System,” this essay discusses some of the major challenges we will face in feeding the world in 2050. A first challenge is nutritional: 690 million people are currently undernourished, while 2.1 billion adults are overweight or obese. The current global food system is insufficient in ensuring that the nutritious foods that make up healthy diets are available and accessible for the world's population. Moreover, by 2050, as the (...)
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  16. Territorial Sovereignty: A Philosophical Exploration, Anna Stilz (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019), 304 Pp., Cloth $35.95, eBook $34.99. [REVIEW]Helder De Schutter - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):161-164.
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  17. Introduction: Ethics and the Future of the Global Food System.Madison Powers - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):31-33.
    The coming decades will present an immense challenge for the planet: sustainably feeding nearly ten billion people that are expected to be alive by 2050. This is no small task, and one that intersects with climate change, geopolitics, the increased globalization of agricultural markets, and the emergence of new technologies. The world faces a challenge of increased demand, propelled by an expanding world population and a global shift in dietary patterns toward more resource-intensive foods. Moreover, changes in demand occur in (...)
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  18. Subversive Future Seeks Like-Minded Model: On the Mismatch Between Visions of Food Sovereignty Futures and Quantified Scenarios of Global Food Futures.Yashar Saghai - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):51-67.
    Will we, by 2050, be able to feed a rapidly growing population with healthy and sustainably grown food in a world threatened by systemic environmental crises? There are too many uncertainties for us to predict the long-term evolution of the global agri-food system, but we can explore a wide range of futures to inform policymaking and public debate on the future of food. This is typically done by creating scenarios and quantifying them with computer simulation models to get numerical estimates (...)
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  19. Reconsidering a Human Right to Democracy.Christian Barry - 2020 - Journal of Global Ethics 16 (3):305-315.
    In this brief article, I will raise some challenges to each of Pablo Gilabert’s arguments for a human right to democracy (HRD). First, I will question whether the instrumental case for affirming a HRD is as strong as Gilabert and others have suggested. I will then call into question the argument from moral risk, arguing that, for any particular country, we should not operate with a strong presumption that they should pursue further democratization as a high-priority goal. Finally, I will (...)
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  20. Ethics, Security, and the War Machine: The True Cost of the Military N. Dobos, 2020 Oxford Oxford University Press Ix 184 Pp, £45. [REVIEW]Sara Van Goozen - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (2):351-353.
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  21. Democracy Requires Organized Collective Power.Steven Klein - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  22. The Metaphysics of Intersectionality Revisited.Holly Lawford-Smith & Kate Phelan - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    ‘Intersectionality’ is one of the rare pieces of academic jargon to make it out of the university and into the mainstream. The message is clear and well-known: your feminism had better be intersectional. But what exactly does this mean? This paper is partly an exercise in conceptual clarification, distinguishing at least six distinct types of claim found across the literature on intersectionality, and digging further into the most philosophically complex of these claims—namely the metaphysical and explanatory. It’s also partly a (...)
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  23. Breaking the Cycle: Solidarity with Care-Leaver Mothers.Jenny Krutzinna - 2021 - Journal of Diversity and Gender Studies 7 (2):82-92.
    A significant proportion of child protection cases involve care-experienced mothers, which reveals a continuous cycle of mothers who lose their children to social services after having been in state care themselves as children. While the importance of protecting children requires little explanation and forms the justificatory basis for child protection interventions, it is important to remember that care-experienced mothers were once children entrusted to the state’s care, and who arguably have been failed by the state in that their parenting opportunities (...)
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  24. Justice, Reciprocity, and the Boundaries of State Authority.Alexander Motchoulski - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  25. The Conscription of Informal Political Representatives.Wendy Salkin - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  26. Is Capital Punishment Murder?Luke Maring - 2018 - Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 32 (2):587-601.
    This Article argues that just as the act of forcing sex upon a rapist is itself rape, the execution of a murderer is itself murder. Part I clears the way by defeating three simple, but common, arguments that capital punishment is not murder. Part II shows that despite moral theorists' best attempts to show otherwise, executions seem to instantiate all the morally relevant properties of murder. Part III notes a lacuna in the literature on capital punishment: Even if there is (...)
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  27. Plato's Conception of Justice and the Question of Human Dignity. Second Edition, Revised and Extended.Marek Piechowiak - 2021 - Berlin: Peter Lang International Academic Publishers.
    Contents 1 Introduction / 2 The Timaeus on dignity: the Demiurge’s speech / 3 Justice as a virtue / 4 The content of just actions / 5 Justice of the law and justice of the state / 6 Equality / 7 Some key issues in Plato’s conception of justice / 7.1 What is more excellent—justice of the soul or justice of action? / 7.2 Which activity is best and what is its best object? / 7.2. Just actions over contemplation / (...)
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  28. Activist‐Led Education and Egalitarian Social Change.Cain Shelley - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy:1-24.
    In this article, I offer an account of what one of the short-term political aims of proponents of greater equality ought to be. I claim that the strengthening of reflective capacity—citizens’ ability to impose a temporary level of distance from their commitments, to consider alternatives to them, and to evaluate their origins and validity—ought to be one key aim of egalitarian politics under present political conditions. I then propose activist-led education programs as one desirable means to deliver this end of (...)
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  29. What Should Egalitarian Policies Express? The Case of Paternalism.Anne-Sofie Greisen Hojlund - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  30. Voting for Less Than the Best☆.Michael Ridge - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  31. New Public Management: Puzzles of Democracy and the Influence of Citizens.Tom Christensen & Per Laegreid - 2002 - Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (3):267-295.
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  32. Is Random Selection a Cure for the Ills of Electoral Representation?Dimitri Landa & Ryan Pevnick - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (1):46-72.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  33. On the Very Idea of a “Political” Work of Art.Diarmuid Costello - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (1):25-45.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  34. History Will Judge: Hume's General Point of View in Historical Moral Judgment.Serge Grigoriev - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (1):94-116.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  35. Debate: Anger, Fitting Attitudes, and Srinivasan’s Category of “Affective Injustice”.David Plunkett - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (1):117-131.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  36. Social Injustice, Disadvantaged Offenders, and the State’s Authority to Punish.Andrei Poama - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (1):73-93.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  37. Hate Speech as Antithetical to Free Speech: The Real Polarity.Tiffany Elise Montoya - forthcoming - In Jennifer Kling & William Barnes (eds.), In Politics Polarity and Peace. Leiden, Netherlands:
    I claim that hate speech is actually antithetical to free speech. Nevertheless, this claim invokes the misconception that one would be jeopardizing free speech due to a phenomenon known as "false polarization" – a “tendency for disputants to overestimate the extent to which they disagree about whatever contested question is at hand.” The real polarity does not lie between hate speech (as protected free speech) vs. censorship. Rather, hate speech is censorship. It is the censorship of entire sectors of the (...)
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  38. Privacy and Digital Ethics After the Pandemic.Carissa Véliz - 2021 - Nature Electronics 4:10-11.
    The increasingly prominent role of digital technologies during the coronavirus pandemic has been accompanied by concerning trends in privacy and digital ethics. But more robust protection of our rights in the digital realm is possible in the future. -/- After surveying some of the challenges we face, I argue for the importance of diplomacy. Democratic countries must try to come together and reach agreements on minimum standards and rules regarding cybersecurity, privacy and the governance of AI.
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  39. Will Carbon Taxes Help Address Climate Change?Kian Mintz-Woo - 2021 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 16 (1):24-34.
    The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis ought to serve as a reminder about the costs of failure to consider another long-term risk, climate change. For this reason, it is imperative to consider the merits of policies that may help to limit climate damages. This essay rebuts three common objections to carbon taxes: (1) that they do not change behaviour, (2) that they generate unfair burdens and increase inequality, and (3) that fundamental, systemic change is needed instead of carbon taxes. The (...)
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  40. Empathy as a Predictor of Prosocial Behavior and the Perceived Seriousness of Delinquent Acts: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Argentina and Spain.Lucas Marcelo Rodriguez, Manuel Martí-Vilar, Javier Esparza Reig & Belén Mesurado - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (2):91-101.
    ABSTRACT Empathy is relevant to sociomoral development, especially in relation to prosociality and the penalization of acts as faults and crimes. The objective of this research was to test whether empathy is a predictor of prosociality and of perceptions of seriousness of delinquent acts among research participants in Argentina and Spain. The Argentinian sample comprised 215 high school and university students. The Spanish sample comprised 199 university students. The proposed theoretical model showed good fit in both countries. Although empathy was (...)
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  41. Ciencia, libertad y ética.Gustavo E. Romero - 2020 - Ciencia Del Sur 2 (12.08.2020):1-34.
    La representación científica del mundo se construye sobre un tejido de teorías en las cuales hay enunciados generales que representan leyes naturales. Estas leyes son patrones de sucesos regulares. Un presupuesto básico de la ciencia es que todo acontecimiento es legal: ocurre regido por leyes que son fijas. ¿Es compatible esa legalidad con la libertad de elección que creemos tener? ¿Cuáles son las implicaciones para la libertad política que debemos esperar en una sociedad organizada y racional? ¿Cuál es el rol (...)
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  42. A Normative Foundation for Statism.Patrick Taylor Smith - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
  43. The Miseducation of the Elite.Jennifer M. Morton - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (1):3-24.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  44. Do the Reactive Attitudes Justify Public Reason?Collis Tahzib - 2019 - European Journal of Political Theory:147488511988620.
    According to public reason liberalism, the laws and institutions of society must be in some sense justifiable to all reasonable citizens. But why care about justifiability to reasonable citizens? R...
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  45. Intentional (Nation‐)States: A Group‐Agency Problem for the State’s Right to Exclude.Matthew R. Joseph - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (1):73-87.
    Most philosophical defences of the state’s right to exclude immigrants derive their strength from the normative importance of self-determination. If nation-states are taken to be the political institutions of a people, then the state’s right to exclude is the people’s right to exclude – and a denial of this right constitutes an abridgement of self-determination. In this paper, I argue that this view of self-determination does not cohere with a group-agency view of nation-states. On the group-agency view that I defend, (...)
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  46. Four Challenges to Knowledge Integration for Development and the Role of Philosophy in Addressing Them.Morten Fibieger Byskov - 2020 - Journal of Global Ethics 16 (3):262-282.
    Integrating local knowledge about environmental and socioeconomic circumstances is necessary in order for development efforts to be responsive to local realities and needs. However, knowledge-integ...
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  47. The Virtues of Economic Rescue Legislation: Distributive Justice, Civil Law, and the Troubled Asset Relief Program.Henry S. Kuo - 2021 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 8 (1):aop.
    This study constitutes an ethical analysis through the lens of distributive justice in the case of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), which was enacted in the midst of the Great Recession of 2007–2009. It begins by engaging with the visions of justice constructed by John Rawls and Robert Nozick, using their insights to locate the injustices of TARP according to their moral imaginations. However, this study argues that Rawls’ and Nozick’s theories of justice primarily envision the nature of law (...)
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  48. The Business of Double-Effect: The Ethics of Bankruptcy Protection and the Principle of Double-Effect.Henry S. Kuo - 2020 - Journal of Religion and Business Ethics 4 (11):1-25.
    After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, most legacy airlines filed for bankruptcy protection as a way to cut costs drastically, with the exception of American Airlines. This article applies the Principle of Double-Effect to the act of filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for reasons of management strategy, in particular, cost-cutting. It argues that the Principle can be a useful tool for discerning the ethicality of the action, and demonstrates the usefulness by proposing three double-effect criteria that, when (...)
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  49. Soft Balancing, Institutions, and Peaceful Change.Anders Wivel & T. V. Paul - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (4):473-485.
    As part of the roundtable “International Institutions and Peaceful Change,” this essay examines the role of institutional soft balancing in bringing forth peaceful change in international relations. Soft balancing is understood as attempts at restraining a threatening power through institutional delegitimization, as opposed to hard balancing, which relies on arms buildup and formal alignments. We argue that soft balancing through international institutions can be an effective means to peaceful change, spanning minimalist goals, which aim at incremental change without the use (...)
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  50. Finding Refuge Through Employment: Worker Visas as a Complementary Pathway for Refugee Resettlement.Michael Doyle & Elie Peltz - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (4):433-443.
    This essay identifies and explores an underappreciated win-win policy option that has the potential to address both the needs of refugees for resettlement and the labor demand of destination countries. Building upon provisions of the Model International Mobility Convention—a model convention endorsed by dozens of leading migration and refugee experts—and a program pioneered by Talent Beyond Boundaries, we explore how to scale up valuable measures for identifying job opportunities that can resettle refugees from asylum countries to destination countries. The latter (...)
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