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  1. Heidegger’s Concept of Philosophical Method: Innovating Philosophy in the Age of Global Warming.Will Britt - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):155-159.
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  2. The Power of the Periphery: How Norway Became an Environmental Pioneer for the World.Josh Berry - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):151-154.
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  3. E-Co-Affectivity: Exploring Pathos at Life’s Material Interfaces.Brian Hisao Onishi - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):164-167.
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  4. Living Earth Community: Multiple Ways of Being and Knowing.Tim Irwin - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):160-163.
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  5. A World Not Made for Us: Topics in Critical Environmental Philosophy.Ela Tokay - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):168-171.
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  6. The Usefulness of Uselessness for Conservation in the Ways of Zhuangzi.Félix Landry Yuan - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):65-80.
    Global efforts for biodiversity conservation have gained considerable momentum in recent years. Yet much remains to be learned from the minds of the ancient past regarding perspectives on relations between society and the environment. Zhuangzi is one such figure whose works may be of high relevance to contemporary conservation. While many philosophical ideals underpinning conservation stem from a mostly westernized ethos, strategies can be expanded by non-western principles such as Zhuangzi’s. In light of IPBES’ “nature’s contributions to people” concept, a (...)
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  7. Climate Justice for the Dead and the Dying.Julia D. Gibson - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):5-39.
    Environmentalism has long placed heavy emphasis on strategies that seek to ensure the environment of today and the future roughly mirror the past. Yet while past-oriented approaches have come under increased scrutiny, environmental ethics in the time of climate change is still largely conceptualized as that which could pull humanity back from the brink of disaster or, at least, prevent the worst of it. As a result, practical and conceptual tools for grappling with what is owed to the dead and (...)
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  8. How Do Houses Make the Political Possible?Joshua Mousie, Gabriel Eisen & Mahaa Mahmood - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):123-149.
    We develop the concept “political residency” in this essay to highlight both the foundational role of built environments in our political life as well as how access to, and displacement from, built environments is therefore a central feature of political harms and goods. The example of housing and housing displacement is instructive for developing our concept because it is central to most people’s everyday life, yet residential security and stability—having control with other inhabitants over shared, built spaces—is often missing from (...)
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  9. Tracks: A Material Phenomenology of the Road.Brian Seitz - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):103-122.
    This project is a convergence of environmental philosophy and variant strains of continental philosophy. The aim is to make the familiar a bit unfamiliar, partly by understanding the road as an event, and partly by experimentally downplaying the significance of human intentions, particularly given that originary tracks were frequently the result of simple useage. We humans are always on the road, which in a fundamental sense is going nowhere or, alternatively, is possibly heading toward a dead-end.
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  10. Kant’s Pre-Critical Ontology and Environmental Philosophy.Zachary Vereb - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):81-102.
    In this paper I argue that Kant’s pre-critical ontology, though generally dismissed by environmental philosophers, provides ecological lessons by way of its metaphysical affinities with environmental philosophy. First, I reference where environmental philosophy tends to place Kant and highlight his relative marginalization. This marginalization makes sense given focus on his critical works. I then outline Kant’s pre-critical ontological framework and characterize the ways in which it is ecological. Finally, I conclude with some ecological reflections on the pre-critical philosophy and its (...)
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  11. A Care-Based Approach to Transformative Change: Ethically-Informed Practices, Relational Response-Ability & Emotional Awareness.Angela Moriggi, Katriina Soini, Alex Franklin & Dirk Roep - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):281-298.
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  12. The Case for ‘Contributory Ethics’: Or How to Think About Individual Morality in a Time of Global Problems.Travis N. Rieder & Justin Bernstein - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):299-319.
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  13. Gene Drives, Species, and Compassion for Individuals in Conservation Biology.Yasha Rohwer - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):243-260.
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  14. Consequentialism, Collective Action, and Causal Impotence.Tim Aylsworth & Adam Pham - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):336-349.
    This paper offers some refinements to a particular objection to act consequentialism, the “causal impotence” objection. According to proponents of the objection, when we find circumstances in which severe, unnecessary harms result entirely from voluntary acts, it seems as if we should be able to indict at least one act among those acts, but act consequentialism appears to lack the resources to offer this indictment. Our aim is to show is that the most promising response on behalf of act consequentialism, (...)
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  15. The Invasive Species Diet: The Ethics of Eating Lionfish as a Wildlife Management Strategy.Samantha Noll & Brittany Davis - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):320-335.
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  16. Luck Has Nothing to Do with It: Prevailing Uncertainty and Responsibilities of Due Care.Levente Szentkirályi - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):261-280.
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  17. In Defense of Wild Night.Kimberly M. Dill - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-25.
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  18. As Much as Possible, as Soon As Possible: Getting Negative About Emissions.Kent A. Peacock - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-16.
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  19. Lydia Barnett. After the Flood: Imagining the Global Environment in Early Modern Europe. Xi + 250 Pp., Notes, Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019. $49.95 (Cloth); ISBN 9781421429519. E-Book Available. [REVIEW]David Sepkoski - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):186-187.
  20. Making a Stable Sea: The Littorals of Eighteenth-Century Europe and the Origins of a Spatial Concept.Wilko Graf von Hardenberg - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):130-140.
  21. Gillen D’Arcy Wood. Land of Wondrous Cold: The Race to Discover Antarctica and Unlock the Secrets of Its Ice. 312 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. Princeton, N.J./Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2020. $27.95 (Cloth); ISBN 9780691172200. E-Book and Audiobook Available. [REVIEW]Vanessa Heggie - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):194-195.
  22. A Kantian Perspective on Individual Responsibiity for Sustainability.Kathleen Wallace - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-16.
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  23. Age of Man Environmentalism and Respect for an Independent Nature.Ned Hettinger - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-13.
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  24. The Land Ethic and the Earth Ethic.J. Baird Callicott - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-17.
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  25. Information and Virtue in the Anthropocene.Jason Kawall - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-15.
    To reliably choose morally sound policies, whether as a society or as an individual, will typically require a deep and wide-ranging base of relevant knowledge. In this paper I consider the epistemic demands for morally sound action and policy in the Anthropocene age. I argue that these demands are likely to be unsatisfied, leading to a potential downward spiral of ineffective action in the face of worsening conditions; this seems a strong possibility both for individual lives, and for societies as (...)
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  26. Ethics, Adaptation, and the Anthropocene.Marion Hourdequin - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-15.
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  27. Arguments From Need in Natural Resource Debates.Espen Dyrnes Stabell - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-15.
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  28. Author Meets Critics: Paul Thompson, The Spirit of the Soil, 2nd Ed.Allen Thompson, Clark Wolf, Evelyn Brister & Paul Thompson - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-30.
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  29. The Most Good We Can Do or the Best Person We Can Be?Michel Bourban & Lisa Broussois - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):159-179.
    We challenge effective altruism (EA) on the basis that it should be more inclusive regarding the demands of altruism. EA should consider carefully agents’ intentions and the role those intentions can play in agents’ moral lives. Although we argue that good intentions play an instrumental role and can lead to better results, by adopting a Hutchesonian perspective, we show that intentions should, first and foremost, be considered for their intrinsic value. We examine offsetting and geoengineering, two so-called solutions to climate (...)
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  30. State Commissioning of Solar Radiation Management Geoengineering.Andrew Lockley - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):180-202.
    ABSTRACT Solar Radiation Management is a proposed response to Anthropogenic Global Warming. Other papers consider private SRM provision, e.g. via Voluntary Carbon Offsets. Limited VCO markets would under-supply SRM, so state provision or mandating is possible. Public funding does not presume state execution; private subcontracting is feasible. Notwithstanding concerns about privatization, we assume state commissioning of SRM – proposing and analyzing plausible governance, by adapting extant proposals. We consider two regulatory functions: legal/corporate; and scientific/technical. We briefly discuss mandatory, emissions-linked SRM (...)
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  31. The Case for a 21st Century Wilderness Ethic.Brian Petersen & John Hultgren - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):222-239.
    ABSTRACT Past debates surrounding wilderness have not led to constructive dialogue but instead have created a rift between dueling sides. Far from academic, this debate has important ethical, policy, and practical implications. We outline out the major fault lines of the debate between wilderness realists and constructivists and also identify common ground between them. From this starting point, we offer three potential bridges between them and conclude by proposing a preliminary vision of a 21st Century wilderness ethic focused on social-ecological (...)
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  32. When Ecology Needs Economics and Economics Needs Ecology: Interdisciplinary Exchange During the Anthropocene.S. Andrew Inkpen & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):203-221.
    ABSTRACT Evidence that humans play a dominant role in most ecosystems forces scientists to confront systems that contain factors transgressing traditional disciplinary boundaries. However, it is an open question whether this state of affairs should encourage interdisciplinary exchange or integration. With two case studies, we show that exchange between ecologists and economists is preferable, for epistemological and policy-oriented reasons, to their acting independently. We call this “exchange gain.” Our case studies show that theoretical exchanges can be less disruptive to current (...)
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  33. The Tragic Death of a Utah Goblin: Conservation and the Problem of Abiotic Nature.Alexander Lee - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):144-158.
    ABSTRACT Biocentric and ecocentric ethics offer a rich discourse on protecting biotic communities – defending conservation with inherent value tied to life. A problem arises from these views if mountains, glaciers, canyons, and other abiotic natural objects matter in and of themselves. Abiotic nature helps demonstrate and delineate the boundaries of environmental ethics grounded in life-based axiology. A series of thought experiments suggest that orienting conservation as a question of obligation offers an additional avenue to explore and defend the protection (...)
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  34. Rethinking Wilderness: By Mark Woods, Peterborough, Ontario, Broadview Press, 2017, 312 Pp., $29.95 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-1-55111-348-7.Elisa Aaltola - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):240-242.
    The first impression after opening Mark Wood’s Rethinking Wilderness is that of vigor and thoroughness: clearly a significant amount of research and work has gone into this book. In analyzing diffe...
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  35. Temporal Ontology in Ecology: Developing an Ecological Awareness Through Time, Temporality and the Past-Present Parallax.Jack Black & Jim Cherrington - 2021 - Environmental Philosophy 18 (1):41-63.
    Theoretical applications of time and temporality remain a key consideration for both climate scientists and the humanities. By way of extending this importance, we critically examine Timothy Morton’s proposed “ecological awareness” alongside Slavoj Žižek’s “parallax view”. In doing so, the article introduces a “past-present parallax” in order to contest that, while conceptions of the past are marked by “lack”, equally, our conceptions of and relations to Nature remain grounded in an ontological incompleteness, marked by contingency. This novel approach presents an (...)
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  36. Carlo Alvaro. Raw Veganism: The Philosophy of the Human Diet.Gregory F. Tague - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):352-356.
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  37. Ashish Kothari, Ariel Salleh, Arturo Escobar, Federico Demaria, Alberto Acosta, Eds. Pluriverse: A Post-Development Dictionary.Kalpita Bhar Paul - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):372-376.
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  38. Frédéric Neyrat. The Unconstructable Earth: An Ecology of Separation.Marin Lucio Mare - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):362-365.
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  39. Corine Pelluchon. Nourishment: A Philosophy of the Political Body.Marjolein Oele & Jacqueline Clement - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):366-371.
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  40. David Wood. Reoccupy Earth: Notes Toward An Other Beginning.Parker Biehn - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):357-361.
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  41. Kelly A. Parker and Heather E. Keith, Eds. Pragmatist and American Philosophical Perspectives on Resilience.Lauren Eichler - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):347-351.
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  42. Climate Change and the Historicity of Nature in Hegel, Nishida, and Watsuji.Lucy Schultz - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):271-290.
    While the existence of nature distinct from human influence becomes evermore suspect, within the natural sciences, human beings are increasingly understood in naturalistic terms. The collision of the human and natural, both within conceptual discourse and the reality of climate change may be considered a “great event” in the Hegelian sense, that reveals a dialectic immanent within the nature/culture distinction. Nishida’s notion of “historical nature,” Watsuji’s unique conception of climate, and the traditional satoyama landscapes of Japan offer timely ways of (...)
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  43. Animating the Inanimate—A Deconstructive-Phenomenological Account of Animism.Thomas H. Bretz - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):221-251.
    This paper investigates the plausibility of one aspect of animism, namely the experience of other-than-human beings as exhibiting a kind of inaccessible interiority. I do so by developing a parallel between Husserl’s account of our experience of other conscious beings and our experience of non-conscious as well as so-called inanimate beings. I establish this parallel based on Derrida’s insistence on the irreducibility of context. This allows me to show how the structure of presence qua absence characteristic of our experience of (...)
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  44. How Plants Live.Matthew Hall - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):317-345.
    The recent proliferation of human-plant studies are informed by understandings of how plants live. Philosopher Michael Marder has developed a philosophy of plant ontology, founded on notions of modular independence, radical openness and ontological indifference. This paper critiques, and ultimately rejects, Marder’s key concepts, using a swathe of empirical evidence and theory from the plant sciences and evolutionary ecology. It posits a number of positive statements about these aspects of plant being that better align with the scientific evidence base. The (...)
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  45. A Heideggerian Analysis of Renewable Energy and The Electric Grid.Rudy Kahsar - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):291-315.
    Renewable energy technology is often seen as a positive expression of technology, meeting energy needs with minimal environmental impact. But, by integrating nature with the ordering of the electric grid, renewables silently convert that nature into what Martin Heidegger referred to as standing reserve—resources of the technological commodity chain to be ordered, controlled, converted, and consumed on demand. However, it may be possible to mitigate the downsides of this process through a transition to more decentralized, local sources of renewable energy (...)
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  46. The Uncanny Wonder of Being Edible to Ticks.Brian Hisao Onishi - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):199-219.
    In this paper I argue that an encounter with a tick can produce both fear and wonder. I make a distinction between the legitimate danger of tick borne-diseases and the non-danger of our entanglement with the nature revealed by the tick’s bite in order to highlight the goodness of the tick and the possibilities for post-human existences beyond narratives of conquest and control. Ultimately, I argue that wonder is a helpful mechanism for thinking through the goodness of the tick by (...)
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  47. A Phenomenology of the Ground.O’Neil van Horn - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (2):253-270.
    In light of the already-here disasters of the Anthropocene, what might it mean to define “ground” phenomenologically? That is, if one is to get beyond the ‘merely rational’ and enter into the ‘dustier’ matters of ecological philosophizing, how might one phenomenologically consider the ground? This article will dwell on the nature of the earth-ground—or, soil—as a rematerialized grounding principle for phenomenology in this age of climate crisis. Contending with Heidegger, among others, this poietic article limns possibilities for a ‘grounded’ phenomenology.
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  48. When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth: The Horror of Being Prey and Forgetting Nature, Yet Again, in Jurassic Park and Jurassic World.Eric Godoy - 2020 - In Jonathan Beever (ed.), Philosophy, Film, and the Dark Side of Interdependence. Lanham: Lexington Books. pp. 141-155.
    We constantly forget our interdependence with nature as we lose track of what “natural” means. Consider especially the American nostalgia for an imagined past believed to be lost; a past in which our relationship with nature was more authentic, more natural. Yet, as I argue below, such a past never really existed. The scary thing is, so long as that nostalgia guides our desire for a return to a “proper” relationship with nature, we’re bound to be misguided and forget again (...)
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  49. Egoistic Love of the Nonhuman World? Biology and The Love Paradox.Elisa Aaltola - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-20.
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  50. On the Permissibility (or Otherwise) of Negative Emissions.Dominic Lenzi - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-14.
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1 — 50 / 2358