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  1. Sustainability for a Warming Planet.David M. Frank - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-5.
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  2. Two Concepts of Wrongful Harm: A Response.Idil Boran - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-4.
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  3. Climate Change, Climate Engineering, and the ‘Global Poor’: What Does Justice Require?Marion Hourdequin - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-19.
    ABSTRACTIn recent work, Joshua Horton and David Keith argue on distributive and consequentialist grounds that research into solar radiation management geoengineering is justified because the resulting knowledge has the potential to benefit everyone, particularly the ‘global poor.’ I argue that this view overlooks procedural and recognitional justice, and thus relegates to the background questions of how SRM research should be governed. In response to Horton and Keith, I argue for a multidimensional approach to geoengineering justice, which entails that questions of (...)
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  4. Toward Legitimate Governance of Solar Geoengineering Research: A Role for Sub-State Actors.Sikina Jinnah, Simon Nicholson & Jane Flegal - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-20.
    ABSTRACTTwo recently proposed solar radiation management experiments in the United States have highlighted the need for governance mechanisms to guide SRM research. This paper draws on the literatures on legitimacy in global governance, responsible innovation, and experimental governance to argue that public engagement is a necessary condition for any legitimate SRM governance regime. We then build on the orchestration literature to argue that, in the absence of federal leadership, U.S. states, such as California, New York, and other existing leaders in (...)
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  5. Institutional Legitimacy and Geoengineering Governance.Daniel Edward Callies - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-17.
    ABSTRACTThere is general agreement amongst those involved in the normative discussion about geoengineering that if we are to move forward with significant research, development, and certainly any future deployment, legitimate governance is a must. However, while we agree that the abstract concept of legitimacy ought to guide geoengineering governance, agreement surrounding the appropriate conception of legitimacy has yet to emerge. Relying upon Allen Buchanan’s metacoordination view of institutional legitimacy, this paper puts forward a conception of legitimacy appropriate for geoengineering governance, (...)
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  6. Recognitional Justice, Climate Engineering, and the Care Approach.Christopher Preston & Wylie Carr - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-16.
    ABSTRACTGiven the existing inequities in climate change, any proposed climate engineering strategy to solve the climate problem must meet a high threshold for justice. In contrast to an overly thin paradigm for justice that demands only a science-based assessment of potential temperature-related benefits and harms, we argue for the importance of attention to recognitional justice. Recognitional justice, we go on to claim, calls for a different type of assessment tool. Such an assessment would pay attention to neglected considerations such as (...)
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  7. The Ikhwan Al-Safa’’s Animal Accusers: In Advance.Katharine Loevy - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  8. Ethics, Philosophy and the Environment.Arran Gare - 2018 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 14 (3):219-240.
    Educated people everywhere now acknowledge that ecological destruction is threatening the future of civilization. While philosophers have concerned themselves with environmental problems, they appear to offer little to deal with this crisis. Despite this, I will argue that philosophy, and ethics, are absolutely crucial to overcoming this crisis. Philosophy has to recover its grand ambitions to achieve a comprehensive understanding of nature and the place of humanity within it, and ethics needs to be centrally concerned with the virtues required to (...)
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  9. Working the Biosphere in Advance.Lauri Lahikainen & Tero Toivanen - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  10. The Ethical Function of Landscape Architecture.Roger Paden - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):139-158.
    This essay presents a theory of aesthetics for landscape gardening based on Karsten Harries’s theory of the ethical function of architecture. It begins with an attempt to understand Horace Walpole’s praise of William Kent’s contribution to the development of “the modern taste in gardening,” according to which Kent was largely responsible for achieving the progressive revolution in landscape architecture that produced the picturesque style of English landscape gardening. After examining Harries’s theory, the essay discusses whether landscape architecture can produce works (...)
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  11. Kathleen Dean Moore. Piano Tide: A Novel.Jennifer Schell - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):341-343.
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  12. Svetozar Y. Minkov and Bernhardt L. Trout, Eds. Mastery of Nature: Promises and Prospects.Nathaniel Wolloch - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):348-350.
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  13. Environmental Deficit and Contemporary Nigeria.Ronald Olufemi Badru - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):195-211.
    Three groups of claims frame this article. First, the Nigerian State is largely enmeshed in environmental deficit, given the substantial oil pollution in the Niger-delta area, the problem of erosion in the Southeast, the filthy status of the Southwest, and the incessantly worrying perturbation of the ecological stability in the Northern part of Nigeria. Second, the political leadership in Nigeria for years has not really given genuine policy priority to, and, on this model, developed a credible framework that the citizenry (...)
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  14. Gerard Kuperus and Marjolein Oele, Eds. Ontologies of Nature: Continental Perspectives and Environmental Reorientations.Thomas Bretz - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):333-337.
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  15. An Ecosemiotic Critique of Heidegger’s Concept of Enframing.Craig Frayne - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):213-236.
    This essay presents ecosemiotics as an approach to interpreting Heidegger in environmental philosophy. Comparisons between Heidegger’s philosophy and ecosemiotics have often focused on the 1929–1930 lecture course where Heidegger discusses Jakob von Uexküll’s notion of Umwelt. These and other ecological interpretations reach an impasse with the sharp ontological boundary Heidegger places between Dasein and more-than-human lifeforms. This essay revisits the theme by focusing on a central concept from Heidegger’s later work: enframing [Gestell]. Enframing, it is argued, can be understood as (...)
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  16. Peter Mancall. Nature and Culture in the Early Modern Atlantic.Amanda Parris - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):338-340.
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  17. Laura Ephraim. Who Speaks for Nature? On the Politics of Science.Clint Wilson - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):344-347.
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  18. An Anthropomorphic Dilemma.Valentina Gamberi & Lucia Zaietta - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):275-294.
    Can we really transcend our own human point of view in approaching the non-human? Rather than confining anthropomorphism in the field of the superstitious or identifying it with anthropocentrism, we propose a “weak” anthropomorphism. By adopting phenomenology as methodology, particularly Merleau-Ponty’s notions of corporeity and flesh, we suggest that anthropomorphism is the result of a shared bodily perception: first of all, we are-in-the-world. What we have is not a divide between the human and the non-human, but rather a blurred and (...)
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  19. Bringing Levinas Down to Earth.Joe Larios - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):295-316.
    This paper adds to the critical work on the relationship between Hans Jonas and Emmanuel Levinas by arguing that the experience of the face of the other can be made compatible with Jonas’s understanding of metabolism thus allowing for an extension of who counts as an other to include all organic life forms. Although this extension will allow for a broadening of ethical patients on one side, we will see that a corresponding broadening of ethical agents on the other side (...)
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  20. Three Types of Anthropocentrism.Ben Mylius - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):159-194.
    This paper develops a language for distinguishing more rigorously between various senses of the term ‘anthropocentrism.’ Specifically, it differentiates between:1. Perceptual anthropocentrism ;2. Descriptive anthropocentrism 3. Normative anthropocentrism.
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  21. Poetry, Vegetality, Relief From Being.Mark Payne - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):255-274.
    In ancient Greek ecological thought, vegetality is the most basic ground of life. It is followed by animality and rationality as increasingly active, self-aware forms of life. An ontology of forms of life need not justify a hierarchy among actual living beings, but in practice it often does. This paper shows how the poetic representation of plants resists this slippage. Poetry offers human beings an ecstasis from their own animality so that they can apprehend their participation in the vegetality of (...)
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  22. Grids of Power.Brian Seitz - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):317-332.
    The word “power” tends toward divergent formations, and this paper is prompted by the intersection of two of them. The first form taken up here is power as control, while the second form is material power as fuel. The typical modern configuration of the first form implies an understanding of the second form as subordinate. But what I argue here is that insofar as fuel is a condition of the possibility of being human, the identity of the human being has (...)
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  23. A Tapestry of Concealments.Byron Williston - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (2):237-254.
    The Good Anthropocene is a position taken up by a diverse collection of writers, social scientists, and philosophers. Their claim is that the Anthropocene should be embraced as a more or less positive development in the history of our species. This paper pushes back against the narrative of the Good Anthropocene. But rather than confront its advocates directly, I will come at the contest obliquely. I present a Heideggerian interpretation of Annie Proulx’s Barkskins, a multi-generational novel centered on the deforestation (...)
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  24. Epistemic Environmentalism.Shane Ryan - 2018 - Journal of Philosophical Research 43:97-112.
    I motivate and develop a normative framework for undertaking work in applied epistemology. I set out the framework, which I call epistemic environmentalism, explaining the role of social epistemology and epistemic value theory in the framework. Next, I explain the environmentalist terminology that is employed and its usefulness. In the second part of the paper, I make the case for a specific epistemic environmentalist proposal. I argue that dishonest testimony by experts and certain institutional testifiers should be liable to the (...)
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  25. Environmental Deficit and Contemporary Nigeria in Advance.Ronald Olufemi Badru - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  26. An Ecosemiotic Critique of Heidegger’s Concept of Enframing in Advance.Craig Frayne - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  27. Thinking Like a Mall: Environmental Philosophy After the End of Nature.Steven Vogel - 2015 - Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press.
    A provocative argument that environmental thinking would be better off if it dropped the concept of “nature” altogether and spoke instead of the built environment. -/- Environmentalism, in theory and practice, is concerned with protecting nature. But if we have now reached “the end of nature,” as Bill McKibben and other environmental thinkers have declared, what is there left to protect? In Thinking like a Mall, Steven Vogel argues that environmental thinking would be better off if it dropped the concept (...)
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  28. Agricultural Technologies as Living Machines: Toward a Biomimetic Conceptualization of Smart Farming Technologies.Vincent Blok & Bart Gremmen - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):246-263.
    ABSTRACTSmart Farming Technologies raise ethical issues associated with the increased corporatization and industrialization of the agricultural sector. We explore the concept of biomimicry to conceptualize smart farming technologies as ecological innovations which are embedded in and in accordance with the natural environment. Such a biomimetic approach of smart farming technologies takes advantage of its potential to mitigate climate change, while at the same time avoiding the ethical issues related to the industrialization of the agricultural sector. We explore six principles of (...)
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  29. Responsibility in Practice: Hans Jonas as Environmental Political Theorist.Lewis Coyne - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):229-245.
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  30. A Different Kind of Rigor: What Climate Scientists Can Learn From Emergency Room Doctors.Kent A. Peacock - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):194-214.
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  31. Is Climate Change Morally Good From Non-Anthropocentric Perspectives?Toby Svoboda & Jacob Haqq-Misra - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):215-228.
    Anthropogenic climate change poses some difficult ethical quandaries for non-anthropocentrists. While it is hard to deny that climate change is a substantial moral ill, many types of non-human organisms stand to benefit from climate change. Modelling studies provide evidence that net primary productivity (NPP) could be substantially boosted, both regionally and globally, as a result of warming from increased concentrations of greenhouse gases. The same holds for deployment of certain types of climate engineering, or large-scale, technological modifications of the global (...)
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  32. Beware of the Toll Keepers: The Ethics of Geoengineering Ethics.Adam Briggle - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):187-189.
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  33. ‘More Than an Idea or a Norm’: Religion, Justice, and Practicality in Dialog with the Tollgate Principles.Forrest Clingerman, Laura M. Hartman & Kevin J. O’Brien - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):190-193.
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  34. Environmental Trolley Problems and Ethical Assumptions in the Geoengineering Debate.Kevin Meeker - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):178-180.
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  35. Putting the Tollgate Principles Into Practice.David R. Morrow - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):175-177.
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  36. Examining the Implications of the Tollgate Principles for the Governance of Geoengineering.Lorenzo Nericcio - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):184-186.
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  37. Caution in Defining the Public for Legitimate Geoengineering Governance.Ivo Wallimann-Helmer - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):181-183.
    Although I believe that Gardiner and Fragnière are right to claim that geoengineering governance demands participatory structures, I think more caution is needed. First, the public to be considered because it is affected must be differentiated depending on the geoengineering technique at issue and on the severity of its impact. Second, to avoid undermining democratic legitimacy, ethical conditions of legitimacy must be carefully assessed. Even though future generations and nature are very likely to be affected by geoengineering, their representation is (...)
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  38. The Tollgate Principles for the Governance of Geoengineering: Moving Beyond the Oxford Principles to an Ethically More Robust Approach.Stephen M. Gardiner & Augustin Fragnière - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):143-174.
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  39. Climate Change and the Inescapable Present.Jeanne Tiehen - 2018 - Performance Philosophy 4 (1):123-138.
    The crisis of climate change is a difficult phenomenon to conceptualize, particularly in light of how we experience time and how our consciousness works. It is an event that spans tense in ways that are difficult to pinpoint, and it provides no past precedent to shape our future anticipations. Furthermore, climate change encounters us at a moment when time also feels compressed. This paper explores climate change and its relationship to time by assessing how theatre, with its own phenomenologically unique (...)
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  40. An Anthropomorphic Dilemma in Advance.Valentina Gamberi & Lucia Zaietta - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  41. Beastly Sovereignty in Advance.Geoffrey Bennington - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  42. Grids of Power in Advance.Brian Seitz - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  43. Neither Beast nor Sovereign in Advance.Cary Wolfe - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  44. Prosthetic Figures in Advance.Apple Igrek - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  45. Who/What is Bête? From an Uncanny Word to an Interanimal Ethics.Annabelle Dufourcq - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  46. And Say the Animal Resisted? Derrida, Biopolitics, and the Problem with Species.Rebekah Sinclair - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  47. Commutative Justice and Access and Benefit Sharing for Genetic Resources.Anna Deplazes-Zemp - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):110-126.
    The Convention on Biological Diversity and its Nagoya Protocol established an Access and Benefit Sharing system between utilizers and providers of genetic resources. ABS is understood as a tool that should promote commutative justice between the involved parties. This essay discusses what exactly it is that is being exchanged in the ABS process. It critically analyses moral claims to compensation that are implied by the ABS system for genetic resources. It argues that with the exception of cases in which traditional (...)
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  48. Distributing Risks: Allocation Principles for Distributing Reversible and Irreversible Losses.Neelke Doorn - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):96-109.
    This paper aims to develop a framework for distributing risks. Based on a distinction between risks with reversible losses and risks with irreversible losses, I defend the following composite allocation principle: first, irreversible risks should be allocated on the basis of needs and only after some threshold level has been achieved can the remaining risks distributed in such a way that the total disvalue of these losses is minimized. An important advantage of this allocation framework is that it does not (...)
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  49. Social Constructivism and Beyond. On the Double Bind Between Politics and Science.Matthias Lievens & Anneleen Kenis - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):81-95.
    Moving beyond the post-political framing of the climate change debate, scholars have tried to show that scientific practice is based on politically significant forms of social construction. While sympathizing with this attempt, this paper questions their use of the term ‘political’. Drawing on post-foundational political theory and focusing on the example of climate denialism, it argues that the relation between science and the political constitutes a double bind: while upholding an original distinction between science and the political is untenable, representing (...)
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  50. An Analysis of Potential Ethical Justifications for Mammoth De-Extinction And a Call for Empirical Research.Yasha Rohwer & Emma Marris - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):127-142.
    We argue that the de-extinction of the mammoth cannot be ethically grounded by duties to the extinct mammoth, to ecosystem health or to individual organisms in ecosystems missing the mammoth. However, the action can be shown to be morally permissible via the goods it will afford humans, including advances in scientific knowledge, valuable experiences of awe and pleasure, and perhaps improvements to our moral character or behaviour—if and only if suffering is minimal. Finally, we call for empirical research into how (...)
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