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  1. Emerald Star-Law: Three Interpretations of Earth Jurisprudence.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - Philosophy Today.
    Comparative religion scholar Thomas Berry’s influential concept of “Earth jurisprudence” has been helpfully elaborated in three principal books. My first section identifies four of their common themes, deriving therefrom an implicit narrative: (1) the basis of ecology is autopoiesis, which (2) originally generated human communities and Indigenous vernacular laws, which were (3) later reasserted by forest defenders who fought to create the Magna Carta’s “Charter of the Forest,” which is (4) now championed globally by the Indian physicist and eco-activist Vandana (...)
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  2. Cosmovisions dan Realitas: filosofi masing-masing.Roberto Thomas Arruda - 2024 - Terra à Vista.
    Cosmovision adalah istilah yang seharusnya berarti seperangkat fondasi yang darinya muncul pemahaman sistemik tentang Alam Semesta, komponen-komponennya sebagai kehidupan, dunia tempat kita hidup, alam, fenomena manusia, dan hubungan mereka. Oleh karena itu, ini adalah bidang filsafat analitis yang disuplai oleh ilmu pengetahuan, yang tujuannya adalah pengetahuan yang terkumpul dan berkelanjutan secara epistemologis tentang segala sesuatu yang ada dan terkandung dalam diri kita, yang mengelilingi kita, dan yang berhubungan dengan kita dengan cara apa pun. Ini adalah sesuatu yang sama tuanya dengan (...)
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  3. Expensive Tastes and Living in High-Risk or Hazardous Areas: Claims to Compensation.Siobhain Lash - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    In this paper, I defend a position contrary to a popular view of distributive justice. Residents of flood-prone or otherwise hazardous areas, like the Gulf South of the United States, receive substantial amounts of aid, paid through taxes on people living elsewhere in the US, after natural disasters that frequent the region. In popular discourse, some argue that we have reason not to (re)build in high-risk or hazardous areas, like the Gulf South. Instead, these residents, and others in similarly situated (...)
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  4. Virtue Ethics and Person-Place Relationships.Carolyn Mason - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    Indigenous knowledge and work in social science demonstrates the importance for well-being of people’s relationships with places, but western moral theorists have said little on this topic. This paper argues that there is a neo-Aristotelian virtue associated with forming a relationship with a place or places; that is, human beings can form relationships with places that affect their perceptions, emotions, desires and actions, and such dispositions, when properly developed, increase the chance that people will flourish. As well as discussing the (...)
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  5. Cybernetic or Machinic Ecology? Guattari’s Parting Ways with Bateson in advance.Julie Van der Wielen - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
    In this article, I examine the relation between Bateson and Guattari’s ecological thoughts: two thinkers whose ecological ideas at first sight have a lot in common. In order to show the difference between the thoughts of both thinkers, I will take my clue from Guattari’s remark that he parts ways with Bateson on the role of context. Explaining the role of context in both authors will allow me to show how Guattari’s thought implies both an endorsement and a critique of (...)
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  6. Joining Hands: Politics and Religion Together for Social Change.Roger S. Gottlieb (ed.) - 2002 - Routledge.
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  7. Individual Responsibility for Collective Climate Change Harms.Adriana Placani - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    This work employs Elizabeth Cripps’ collectivist account of responsibility for climate change in order to ground an individual duty to reduce one’s GHG emissions. This is significant not only as a critique of Cripps, but also as an indication that even on some collectivist footings, individuals can be assigned primary duties to reduce their emissions. Following Cripps, this work holds the unstructured group of GHG emitters weakly collectively responsible for climate change harms. However, it argues against Cripps that what follows (...)
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  8. Metaphysical Status of Money and Sustainable Organizations and Ecosystems.Tiago Cardao-Pito & Jyldyz Abdyrakhmanova - 2024 - Philosophy of Management:1-30.
    The current economic and societal production system gives money a magnified importance, overlooking other essential flows necessary for human survival and existence. It focuses on monetary indicators like profits, dividends, and GDPs to evaluate organizational production, while often disregarding outputs that harm the biosphere. Money is treated as the constitutive being (ousia) and attributed undemonstrated explanatory properties. Intangible flow theory helps eliminate this metaphysical status of money by recognizing that monetary flows are just one of many necessary flows for human (...)
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  9. Kantian Animal Ethics, Deep Dignity, and the Moral Game in advance.Inês Salgueiro - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
    This paper explores Kant’s concept of dignity to claim that animals deserve moral consideration. The central notion in the paper is of that of “moral game,” a hypothetical scenario that illustrates our obligations to cooperate with rational agents and the natural world. This game displays how rational agents can collaborate with non-rational animals despite their inability to engage in reciprocal legislation. From reflection on what this game shows and by introducing a notion of “deep dignity,” I argue that rational beings (...)
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  10. Fostering Ecocentric Subjects in advance.Andrea Natan Feltrin - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
    This paper introduces self-rewilding, a philosophy prioritizing ecologically aware, ecocentric living. It examines human-environment interactions, advocating for an ecological consciousness and multispecies sensibility. Within this framework, unlike traditional views of nature, “wild” is preferred to signify the interconnectedness of all ecosystem agents. Self-rewilding is presented as a method to foster coexistence and multispecies justice, encouraging societal shifts towards ecocentric practices through ecological re-enchantment and discomfort acceptance. Aimed at enriching lives and catalyzing positive ecological change, this concept underscores the potential for (...)
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  11. Earth and the ontology of planets.Vincent Blok - 2024 - In Mirko Daniel Garasic & Marcello Di Paola (eds.), The philosophy of outer space: explorations, controversies, speculations. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. pp. 41-55.
    what is the ontology of planets?Our access point to this question is the ontology of planet Earth. Although the presence of life marks planet Earth as special among other planets, Earth shares a basic commonality with them – namely, its material existence. We take this commonality as a point of departure for our reflections on the ontology of both planet Earth and other planets. In this chapter, we ask for the ontology of this materiality of planets. We consult the ontology (...)
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  12. Experiencing a Garden in advance.David Fenner - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  13. Norms of Species Translocation 50 Years After the Ethic of Organic Diversity.Colby J. Clark - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    From island biogeography theory, the ethic of organic diversity was posited as a precept to guide applied biogeography. It states that humanity must act in such a way as to reduce the rate of worldwide species extinction for an indefinite period of time. Almost 50 years later, the ethic of organic diversity remains relevant in the context of the debate over species translocation practices. Ultimately, matters of biodiversity conservation are too complex to expect an exceptionless moral framework to determine whether (...)
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  14. Evolution in Space and Time: The Second Synthesis of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and the Philosophy of Biology.Mitchell Ryan Distin - 2023 - Self-published because fuck the leeches of Big Publishing.
    Change is the fundamental idea of evolution. Explaining the extraordinary biological change we see written in the history of genomes and fossil beds is the primary occupation of the evolutionary biologist. Yet it is a surprising fact that for the majority of evolutionary research, we have rarely studied how evolution typically unfolds in nature, in changing ecological environments, over space and time. While ecology played a major role in the eventual acceptance of the population genetic viewpoint of evolution in the (...)
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  15. ‘Relational Values’ is Neither a Necessary nor Justified Ethical Concept.Patrik Baard - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 1 (1).
    ‘Relational value’ (RV) has intuitive credibility due to the shortcomings of existing axiological categories regarding recognizing the ethical relevance of people’s relations to nature. But RV is justified by arguments and analogies that do not hold up to closer scrutiny, which strengthens the assumption that RV is redundant. While RV may provide reasons for ethically considering some relations, much work remains to show that RV is a concept that does something existing axiological concepts cannot, beyond empirically describing relations people have (...)
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  16. Die Bedeutung interkultureller Perspektiven für eine Erweiterung der Umweltethik. [REVIEW]Cristina Chitu - 2021 - Polylog. Zeitschrift Für Interkulturelles Philosophieren 45.
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  17. Cosmovisioni e realtà: la filosofia di ciascuno.Roberto Thomas Arruda - 2024 - São Paulo: Terra à Vista.
    Cosmovisione è un termine che dovrebbe significare un insieme di fondamenti da cui emerge una comprensione sistemica dell'Universo, delle sue componenti come la vita, il mondo in cui viviamo, la natura, il fenomeno umano e le sue relazioni. Si tratta, quindi, di un campo della filosofia analitica alimentato dalle scienze, il cui obiettivo è questa conoscenza aggregata ed epistemologicamente sostenibile su tutto ciò che siamo e conteniamo, che ci circonda e che in qualche modo si relaziona con noi. È qualcosa (...)
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  18. Environmental Radicalism: Talking About a Revolution.Matthew J. LaVine & Claudia J. Ford - 2023 - Journal for the Study of Radicalism 17 (2):111-148.
    In this article, we advocate for a particular form of environmental radicalism that realizes a revolution in ways of thinking, knowing, and acting in human relationships with ourselves, with others—in multiple senses of the that term—and with the earth. In this endeavor, we join many environmental researchers and activists in calling for a fundamental shift in the terms and enactment of the human relationship to the planet and its natural systems. However, we are convinced that to be successful in halting (...)
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  19. Mobilizing Hope Against Pessimism and Plutocracy.Darrel Moellendorf - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):129-145.
    This paper offers responses to the challenges and questions rasied by the comments of John M. Meyer, Gwen Ottinger, Mark Reiff, and Steve Vanderheiden to my book Mobilizing Hope: Climate Change and Global Poverty. Their concerns are insightful, many, and varied. My reply focuses on the following themes: The relationship between moral concern about climate change and moral concern abut global poverty, the role of hope in responding to climate change, the problem of plutocratic influences in democratic politics and international (...)
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  20. Hope Springs Eternal?Steve Vanderheiden - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):125-128.
    As Darrel Moellendorf observes in Mobilizing Hope, climate change and poverty are intertwined in various ways, including the facts that climate impacts threaten to exacerbate global poverty as well...
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  21. All I Ask of You.Gwen Ottinger - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):112-115.
    Mobilizing Hope asks that we take the eradication of poverty as morally mandatory, that we pursue technological development, and that we act on the belief that it is possible to do both of those things at once. It resolutely does not ask that we redefine prosperity in other-than-economic terms, reconsider the binary between “human” and “nature,” question financialization, colonialism, or other root causes of global poverty, accept qualitatively different lifestyles, or endure painful transitions. While this may seem strategic, I argue (...)
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  22. Thinking about Hope, Vision, and Mobilization with Darrel Moellendorf’s Mobilizing Hope.John M. Meyer - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):108-111.
    Darrel Moellendorf places hope at the core of his call for climate-change vision and action, positing a ‘hopeful vision of a sustainable and prosperous world’ committed to ‘green growth’ – along th...
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  23. Using Synthetic Biology to Avert Runaway Climate Change: A Consequentialist Appraisal.Daniele Fulvi & Josh Wodak - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):89-107.
    We attempt to justify the use of synthetic biology in response to the climate crisis, based on the premise that it is impossible to avert runaway climate change without sequestering sufficient greenhouse gases (GHG), which could only become possible through Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs). Then, moving from a consequentialist standpoint, we acquiesce to how the consequences of using NETs through synthetic biology are preferable to the catastrophic consequences of runaway climate change. In conclusion, we show how our analysis of synthetic (...)
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  24. Understanding Feasibility of Climate Change Goals and Actions.Anna Döhlen Wedin - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):48-62.
    Climate change goals and actions are often discussed with reference to their feasibility. However, in the climate change literature, there is no agreed upon understanding of what feasibility means. In this paper, insights from political philosophy are used to address this problem in a two-fold way. First, different uses of the term feasibility in the climate change context are critically analyzed, surfacing problematic uses that can have severe consequences for what goals or actions are considered. Second, the ‘conditional probability account (...)
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  25. Rationing and Climate Change Mitigation.Nathan Wood, Rob Lawlor & Josie Freear - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):1-29.
    In this paper, we argue that rationing has been neglected as a policy option for mitigating climate change. There is a broad scientific consensus that avoiding the most severe impacts of climate change requires a rapid reduction in global emissions. We argue that rationing could help states reduce emissions rapidly and fairly. Our arguments in this paper draw on economic analysis and historical research into rationing in the UK during (and after) the two world wars, highlighting success stories and correcting (...)
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  26. Accounting for Future Generations in Energy Ethics: The Case for Temporalized Ethical Matrices.Céline Kermisch & Christophe Depaus - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):30-47.
    Accounting for future generations is central in energy ethics and the ethical matrix can be used to reveal ethical impacts on them. However, the way it integrates future generations is questionable. The aim of this paper is to show why this tool does not consider ethical impacts on future generations appropriately and to propose a novel temporalized framework, which characterizes future people according to temporal, spatial and role features. By stimulating the disclosure of intergenerational conflicts, this temporalized matrix provides support (...)
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  27. Synthetic Biology and the Goals of Conservation.Christopher Hunter Lean - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    The introduction of new genetic material into wild populations, using novel biotechnology, has the potential to fortify populations against existential threats, and, controversially, create wild genetically modified populations. The introduction of new genetic variation into populations, which will have an ongoing future in areas of conservation interest, complicates long-held values in conservation science and park management. I discuss and problematize, in light of genetic intervention, what I consider the three core goals of conservation science: biodiversity, ecosystem services, and wilderness. This (...)
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  28. Another Shake of the Bag: Stefansson and Willners on Offsetting and Risk Imposition.Christian Barry & Garrett Cullity - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    There is a difference between acting with a probability of making a difference to who is harmed, and worsening someone’s prospect. This difference is relevant to debates about the ethics of offsetting, since it means that showing that emitting-and-offsetting has the first feature is not a way of showing that it has the second feature. In an earlier paper, we illustrate this difference with an example of a lottery in which you shake the bag from which a ball will be (...)
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  29. Nature et abolitionnisme chez Henry David Thoreau.Olivier Provencher - 2023 - Ithaque 1 (33):81–110.
    L’ambition du présent article est de montrer la filiation entre le naturalisme d’Henry David Thoreau et ses positions antiesclavagistes. Je défends que cette filiation se fait voir par la façon dont l’éthique de Thoreau s’appuie sur une certaine conception de la nature et par la manière dont ses vues abolitionnistes découlent de cette éthique. Je fais valoir, plus précisément, que la fuite de Thoreau dans la nature n’est pas seulement, comme le prétend le politologue Malcom Ferdinand, un moyen comme un (...)
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  30. What the Heck Cattle Have to Do with Environmentalism: Rewilding and the Continuous Project of the Human Management of Nature.Eric Katz - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    In the 1920s and 1930s, an attempt was made to resurrect the aurochs (Bos primigenius primigenius), the extinct wild ancestor of contemporary domestic cattle. The back-bred species that was produced are called ‘Heck cattle’. I argue that the attempt to create the Heck cattle as a form of resurrected aurochs, and their subsequent use in rewilding projects (as in the Oostvaardersplassen in the Netherlands) is a prime example of the continuous human project of the domination of nature. The consideration of (...)
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  31. Stress in Plants : The Hidden Half.Rishikesh Upadhyay - 2023 - United Kingdom: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    This book, in a comprehensive manner, provides an overview of the challenges of increasing crop or agricultural productivity to meet the demands of a growing population, linking descriptions of physiological, ecological, biochemical and molecular activity in plants with their tolerance and adaptation to natural environments. In the case of plants, a stress is an adverse condition or substance that affects or blocks a plant’s metabolism, growth, or development. The threat to productivity in crops and agriculture due to these stresses cannot (...)
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  32. Dalia Nassar. Romantic Empiricism.Fraser Gray - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):338-342.
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  33. Zoltán Boldizsár Simon. The Epochal Event.Forrest Clingerman - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):343-345.
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  34. Simon P. James. How Nature Matters.Tom Greaves - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):333-337.
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  35. Henry Dicks. The Biomimicry Revolution.Alessio Gerola - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):324-328.
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  36. Luke Fischer and David Macauley, eds. The Seasons: Philosophical, Literary, and Environmental Perspectives.T. T. Wright - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):329-332.
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  37. Dipesh Chakrabarty. One Planet, Many Worlds.Joshua Jones - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):319-323.
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  38. On the Concept of Independent Nature.J. Michael Scoville - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):237-265.
    Multiple concepts of nature are at play in environmental theory and practice. One that has gripped several theorists is the idea of nature as referring to that which is independent of humans and human activity. This concept has been subject to forceful criticism, notably in the recent work of Steven Vogel. After clarifying problematic and promising ways of charac­terizing independent nature, I engage Vogel’s critique. While the critique is compelling in certain respects, I argue that it fails to appreciate what (...)
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  39. From the Dialectic of Power to the Posthumanist Sublime.Chad Córdova - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):215-236.
    This essay rereads the Kantian sublime both as an epitome of humanism and as a lesson for posthumanist thought. First, I unfold “On the Dynamically Sublime” as a failed dialectic in which “reason” seeks to sublate the power of “nature.” But Kant’s sublime is irreducible to the “Analytic,” I argue: it exemplifies a quasi-dialectical relation between human and nonhuman that recurs across the third Critique and defines its humanist teleology as a whole. Rereading Kant against that telos, and heeding the (...)
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  40. The Existential Threat of Climate Change.Johanna Oksala - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):191-214.
    The article analyzes the experience of climate anxiety. The investigation is phenomenological in the sense that I will attempt to show that contemporary climate anxiety has a distinctive structure and philosophical meaning, which make it different from both psychological anxiety and existential anxiety, as commonly understood. I will also draw out the consequences of my phenomenological analysis for climate politics. My contention is that forms of prefigurative climate politics can respond to the profound disorientation and apathy regarding our future and (...)
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  41. On the Dubious Merit of Ontologizing Bohr.Robert Booth - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):289-318.
    Despite thinking that an appropriately nonanthropocentric approach to the more-than-human world requires understanding phenomena to be ontologically basic, Karen Barad engages with phenomenology only fleetingly. Here, I suggest that Barad ought to take Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology more seriously for two reasons. First, Barad’s objections to his prospects for a suitably nonanthropocentric phenomenology rely upon a misdirected charge of representationalism. Second, Merleau-Ponty offers theoretical and methodological tools corrective to our tendencies toward metaphysical and behavioral colonialism which align with Barad’s project, yet, (...)
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  42. Of Imaginaries, Places, and Fences.Jared L. Talley - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):267-287.
    We are in places. Some places beckon us, some are to be avoided, and some are banal. However, this emplacement urges reflection. In this essay I consider the role of place in environmental experiences, beginning with analysis of the concepts of place and space that motivate the development of four environmental imaginaries (extractive, wilderness, managed, and reciprocal). Ultimately, through a discussion of fences, I aim to show how place-meanings are materially inscribed on the landscape while evidencing the value of place-based (...)
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  43. Justice for Animals: Our Collective Responsibility Justice for Animals: Our Collective Responsibility, by Martha Nussbaum, 2023, Published by Simon & Schuster, 400 pp., $28.99 (Hardback), ISBN 978-1982102500. [REVIEW]Ronald Sandler, Ryan Baylon & Anya Ghai - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (3):496-500.
    In Justice for Animals: Our Collective Responsibility Martha Nussbaum applies her capabilities approach (CA) to justice to non-human sentient animals (hereafter animals). The book is very much an e...
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  44. How Might Stoic Virtue Ethics Inform Sustainable Clothing Choices?Kai Whiting, Edward Simpson, Angeles Carrasco, Aldo Dinucci & Leonidas Konstantakos - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (3):455-473.
    This paper explores sustainable fashion choices from a Stoic philosophical perspective. Ancient Stoic teachings can help us reexamine our relationship with clothes in the 21st century and provide direction for the considerable number of people that are influenced by contemporary Stoicism. Stoicism provides a clear justification for sustainable living, given its call to live in harmony with Nature. Given the environmental facts, contemporary Stoics would do well to reduce the size of their wardrobe to what is necessary and functional. They (...)
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  45. The Motivation Problem: Jamieson, Gardiner, and the Institutional Barriers to Climate Responsibility.Tim Christion - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (3):387-405.
    After decades of institutional failure to address climate change, the need for ethically-motivated collective action is clear. It is equally clear that this issue is not widely perceived as an ethical problem. As founders of climate ethics research, Dale Jamieson and Stephen Gardiner offer compelling accounts to explain why. Nevertheless, questions of ethical motivation in the face of institutional failure arguably mark an impasse in these otherwise essential contributions. This essay identifies the philosophical limits of Jamieson and Gardiner’s accounts of (...)
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  46. Does Wilderness Matter in the Anthropocene? Resolving a Fundamental Dilemma About the Role of Wilderness in 21 st Century Conservation.Patrick Kelly & Peter Landres - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (3):422-437.
    Should wilderness be understood as primarily untrammeled or primarily natural? In this paper, we examine the conceptual and philosophical roots of untrammeled and natural in the context of the 1964 Wilderness Act and show how in some situations tension can arise between them, leading to a stewardship dilemma and subsequent debate over the future conservation role of wilderness. After showing that this debate is ultimately rooted in a false dichotomy, we offer a conceptual framework that presents managers with the tools (...)
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  47. The Social Cost of Carbon, Abatement Costs, and Individual Climate Duties.Colin Hickey - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (3):474-491.
    In this paper I examine the relation between Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) estimates, abatement cost analyses, and individual climate duties. I first highlight the stakes that SCC and abatement cost estimates potentially have for the content of individual duties to either pay the full or fair cost of their carbon emissions, or offset the volume of their emissions. I survey four methodological options (a minimalist approach, a precautionary approach, an averaging approach, and what I call a ‘sufficiency-bounded’ precautionary approach) (...)
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  48. Exploitation: A Missing Element to Our Understanding of Environmental Justice.Christopher H. Pearson - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (3):374-386.
    Environmental justice crucially depends on issues of distributive justice. However, absent from philosophical examinations of environmental justice has been careful consideration of the role exploitation should occupy in our moral evaluations of some cases the initially present as instances of environmental injustice. This paper seeks to both motivate the importance of understanding the significance exploitation has in select cases of environmental justice, as well as provide a conceptual framework for how to assess the ethics of those cases.
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  49. Irreplaceable Goods: Bridging Sustainability and Intergenerational Sufficientarianism.Rita Vasconcellos Oliveira - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (3):438-454.
    In 1987, the Brundtland Commission urged nations to improve present conditions without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Against the background of this appeal for sustainable development, there is a call for intergenerational justice, under a sufficientarian framework. Despite their strong relation, we claim that, to some degree, intergenerational sufficientarianism disregards relevant sustainability notions. This neglect undermines intergenerational sufficientarianism in the context of sustainability, here operationalized as sustainable development. In response, we propose the concept of irreplaceable (...)
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  50. Mobilizing Hope _Mobilizing Hope_ , by Darrel Moellendorf, Oxford University Press, 2022, 248 pp., £22, ISBN: 9780190875619. [REVIEW]Alex McLaughlin - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (3):492-496.
    If we are to have a chance of limiting climate change to 1.5C, the production of energy through fossil fuels must be rapidly reduced and then ceased altogether. The problem is that urgent poverty a...
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