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  1. Wilderness Experiences as Ethics: From Elevation to Attentiveness.Elisa Aaltola - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):283-300.
    Wilderness experiences were celebrated by the Great Romantics, and figures such as Wordsworth and Thoreau emphasized the need to seek direct contact with the non-human world. Later deep ecologists accentuated the way in which wilderness experiences can spark moral epiphanies and lead to action on behalf of the natural environment. In recent years, psychological studies have manifested how the observations made by the Romantics, nature authors and deep ecologists apply to laypeople: contact with the wilderness does tend to lead to (...)
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  2. Empathy, Intersubjectivity, and Animal Philosophy.Elisa Aaltola - 2013 - Environmental Philosophy 10 (2):75-96.
    The aim of this paper is to investigate key works on empathy and intersubjectivity and to compare how they relate to non-human animals. It will be suggested that intersubjectivity forms a powerful objection to skepticism concerning the minds of other animals and lays the grounds for normatively loaded empathic responses. It will also be argued that the core of intersubjectivity takes place outside of propositional language, thus defying the linguocentric stance often adopted in relation to other animals. Although descriptions of (...)
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  3. Environment, Community, Government.Arun Agrawal - 2010 - In Ilana Feldman & Miriam Iris Ticktin (eds.), In the Name of Humanity: The Government of Threat and Care. Duke University Press.
  4. Democratic Deliberation, Public Reason, and Environmental Politics.Scott F. Aikin - 2006 - Environmental Philosophy 3 (2):52-58.
    The activity of democratic deliberation is governed by the norm of public reason – namely, that reasons justifying public policy must both be pursuant of shared goods and be shareable by all reasonable discussants. Environmental policies based on controversial theories of value, as a consequence, are in danger of breaking the rule that would legitimate their enforcement.
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  5. Past Imperfect.Peter S. Alagona, John Sandlos & Yolanda F. Wiersma - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):49-70.
    Conservation and restoration programs usually involve nostalgic claims about the past, along with calls to return to that past or recapture some aspect of it. Knowledge of history is essential for such programs, but the use of history is fraught with challenges. This essay examines the emergence, development, and use of the “ecological baseline” concept for three levels of biological organization. We argue that the baseline concept is problematic for establishing restoration targets. Yet historical knowledge—more broadly conceived to include both (...)
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  6. Past Imperfect: Using Historical Ecology and Baseline Data for Conservation and Restoration Projects in North America.Peter S. Alagona, John Sandlos & Yolanda F. Wiersma - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):49-70.
    Conservation and restoration programs usually involve nostalgic claims about the past, along with calls to return to that past or recapture some aspect of it. Knowledge of history is essential for such programs, but the use of history is fraught with challenges. This essay examines the emergence, development, and use of the “ecological baseline” concept for three levels of biological organization. We argue that the baseline concept is problematic for establishing restoration targets. Yet historical knowledge—more broadly conceived to include both (...)
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  7. Leave No Trace Starts at Home: A Response to Critics and Vision for the Future.Peter Alagona & Gregory Simon - 2012 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):119 - 124.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 119-124, March 2012.
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  8. Environmental Risks, Social Asymmetry, and Late Modernity.Margarita Alario - 1993 - Social Theory and Practice 19 (3):275-288.
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  9. Ecologizing Sartre's Ontology: Nature, Science, and Dialectics.Matthew C. Ally - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):95-121.
    I argue that Sartre ’s philosophy can be both broadened in its aspirations and deepened in its implications through dialogue with the life sciences. Section 1 introduces the philosophical terrain. Section 2 explores Sartre ’s evolving understanding of nature and human relations with nature. Section 3 explores Sartre ’s perspectives on scientific inquiry, natural history, and dialectical reason. Section 4 outlines recent developments in the life sciences that bear directly on Sartre ’s quiet curiosity about a naturalistic dialectics. Section 5 (...)
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  10. Ecologizing Sartre’s Ontology: Nature, Science, and Dialectics.Matthew C. Ally - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):95-121.
    I argue that Sartre’s philosophy can be both broadened in its aspirations and deepened in its implications through dialogue with the life sciences. Section 1 introduces the philosophical terrain. Section 2 explores Sartre’s evolving understanding of nature and human relations with nature. Section 3 explores Sartre’s perspectives on scientific inquiry, natural history, and dialectical reason. Section 4 outlines recent developments in the life sciences that bear directly on Sartre’s quiet curiosity about a naturalistic dialectics. Section 5 suggests how these developments (...)
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  11. Opposing California’s WaterFix: The Trump Administration and the Future of Environmental Advocacy.Razvan Amironesei & Caleb Scoville - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):29-33.
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  12. Ethics Commands, Aesthetics Demands.Erik Anderson - 2010 - Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):115-133.
    I identify a commonly held position in environmental philosophy, “the received view,” and argue that its proponents beg the question when challenged to demonstrate the relevance of environmental aesthetics for environmental justice. I call this “the inference problem,” and I go on to argue that an alternative to the received view, Arnold Berleant’s participatory engagement model, is better equipped to meet the challenge it poses. By adopting an alternative metaphysics, the engagement model supplies a solution to the inference problem and (...)
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  13. Ethics Commands, Aesthetics Demands: Environmental Aesthetics for Environmental Justice in Newark.Erik Anderson - 2010 - Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):115-133.
    I identify a commonly held position in environmental philosophy, “the received view,” and argue that its proponents beg the question when challenged to demonstrate the relevance of environmental aesthetics for environmental justice. I call this “the inference problem,” and I go on to argue that an alternative to the received view, Arnold Berleant’s participatory engagement model, is better equipped to meet the challenge it poses. By adopting an alternative metaphysics, the engagement model supplies a solution to the inference problem and (...)
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  14. Free Market Versus Political Environmentalism.Terry L. Anderson & Donald R. Leal - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  15. Freedom and the Environment: Reply to Critics.Terry L. Anderson & Donald R. Leal - 1994 - Critical Review 8 (3):461-465.
  16. The Politics of Apathy: Trumping the Ethical Imperative of Climate Change.Nino Antadze - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):45-47.
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  17. Atmospheric Commons as a Public Trust Resource: The Common Heritage of MankindPrinciple in Dialogue with Duties of Citizenship.Raymond Anthony - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):43-48.
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  18. Philip Cafaro and Eileen Crist, Editors. Life on the Brink: Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation. [REVIEW]Darrell P. Arnold - 2013 - Environmental Philosophy 10 (2):113-116.
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  19. The Endangered Species Act, Regulatory Takings, and Public Goods.N. Scott Arnold - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):353-377.
    The Endangered Species Act can impose significant limitations on what landowners may do with their property, especially as it pertains to development. These restrictions imposed by the ESA are part of a larger controversy about the reach of the “Takings Clause” of the Fifth Amendment, which says that private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation. The question this paper addresses is whether these restrictions require compensation. The paper develops a position on the general question of (...)
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  20. The Fabric of the World: Towards a Philosophy of Environment.Maurice Ash - 1992 - Green Books.
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  21. Leave Only Footprints? Reframing Climate Change, Environmental Stewardship, and Human Impact.Monica Aufrecht - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):84-102.
    Cheryl Hall has argued that framing of climate change must acknowledge the sacrifices needed to reach a sustainable future. This paper builds on that argument. Although it is important to acknowledge the value of what must be sacrificed, this paper argues that current frames about the environment falsely portray humans and the environment as in a zero-sum game, and in doing so ask people to give up the wrong things. This could undermine the public’s trust in environmentalism, and might even (...)
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  22. Intrinsic Value of Species.Frank Glen Avantaggio - 1993 - Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    This is an essay about ethics and environmental responsibility. The thesis is that biologic species qua species--not only as collections of individuals or as elements of ecosystems--deserve moral regard. The argument establishes moral considerability on powers and freedoms of relative self-determination and autonomy. It is argued that species are living beings in their own right with their own projects and interests which deserve special regard. The essay draws from the arguments of Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Boethius, Avicenna, Maimonides, Leibniz, Spinoza, Kant, (...)
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  23. Cautious Utopias: Environmental Goal-Setting with Long Time Frames.Patrik Baard & Karin Edvardsson Björnberg - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (2):187-201.
    Sustainable development is a common goal in the public sector but may be difficult to implement due to epistemic uncertainties and the long time frames required. This paper proposes that some of these problems can be solved by formulating cautious utopias, entailing a relationship between means and goals differing from both utopian and realistic goal-setting. Cautiously utopian goals are believed, but not certain, to be achievable and to remain desirable, but are open to future adjustments due to changing desires and/or (...)
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  24. Reply to My Critics: Justifying the Fair Share Argument.Christian Baatz - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):160-169.
    In an earlier article I argued that individuals are obligated not to exceed their fair share of emissions entitlements, that many exceed their fair share at present and thus ought to reduce their emissions as far as can reasonably be demanded. The peer commentators raised various insightful and pressing concerns, but the following objections seem particularly important: It was argued that the fair share argument is insufficiently justified, that it is incoherent, that it would result in more far-reaching duties than (...)
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  25. Climate Change and Individual Duties to Reduce GHG Emissions.Christian Baatz - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):1-19.
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  26. Responsibility for the Past? Some Thoughts on Compensating Those Vulnerable to Climate Change in Developing Countries.Christian Baatz - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):94-110.
    The first impacts of climate change have become evident and are expected to increase dramatically over the next decades. Thus, it becomes more and more pressing to decide who has to compensate those people who suffer from negative impacts of climate change but have neither contributed to the problem nor possess the resources to cope with the consequences. Since the frequently invoked Polluter Pays Principle cannot account for all climate-related harm, I will take a closer look at the much more (...)
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  27. Turning the Corner in Lima: The Language of Differentiation and the ‘Democratization’ of Climate Change Negotiations.Tracy Bach & Rebecca Davidson - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (2):170-187.
    The ‘Lima Call for Climate Action’ decision marked the conclusion of the 20th session of the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. It expresses how the 196 UNFCCC Parties intend to negotiate the elements of a new agreement to be opened for signature in Paris at COP21. This ‘Paris Agreement’ would govern Parties starting in 2020, when the Kyoto Protocol's second commitment period ends. The new agreement would also move Parties beyond the Kyoto Protocol's (...)
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  28. Kinds of Life. On the Phenomenological Basis of the Distinction Between Higher and Lower Animals.Christiane Bailey - 2011 - Journal of Environmental Philosophy 8 (2):47-68.
    Drawing upon Husserl and Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological constitution of the Other through Einfülhung, I argue that the hierarchical distinction between higher and lower animals – which has been dismissed by Heidegger for being anthropocentric – must not be conceived as an objective distinction between “primitive” animals and “more evolved” ones, but rather corresponds to a phenomenological distinction between familiar and unfamiliar animals.
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  29. Nature as Non-Terrestrial: Sacred Natural Landscapes and Place in Indian Vedic and Purāṇic Thought.Meera Baindur - 2009 - Environmental Philosophy 6 (2):43-58.
    A complex process of place-making by Vedic and Purāṇic primary narratives and localized oral secondary narratives shows how nature in India is perceived from a deeply humanized worldview. Some form of cosmic descent from other place-worlds or lokas are used to account for the sacredness of a landscape in the primary narrative called stala purāṇa, while secondary narratives, called stala māhāṭmya, recount the human experience of the sacred. I suggest that sacred geography is not geography of “terrestrial” but of implaced (...)
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  30. Art and Metabolic Force in Deep Time Environments.Monika Bakke - 2017 - Environmental Philosophy 14 (1):41-59.
    Contemporary art practices which take into consideration both bio­logical and geological perspectives on the environment offer an inspiring contribution to the growing geological awareness in the humanities. By drawing attention to the role of metabolic forces in evolution, including inorganic activity, artists enquire into the geological past and future of the earth and beyond. Their work suggests that in a time of environmental crisis, it is particularly important to design future metabolic networks for ourselves and non-human others aimed not only (...)
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  31. A Neo-Hegelian, Feminist, Psychoanalytic Perspective on Ecology.I. D. Balbus - 1982 - Télos 1982 (52):140-155.
  32. Sustainability and Well-Being: The Middle Path to Environment, Society, and the Economy.Asoka Bandarage - 2013 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Introduction : environment, society, and the economy -- Environmental, social, and economic collapse -- Evolution of the domination paradigm -- Ecological and social justice movements -- Ethical path to sustainability and well-being.
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  33. Human Engineering: Helpful or Unnecessary?Melany Banks - 2012 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (2):227 - 229.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 227-229, June 2012.
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  34. Vibrant Matter.Bryan E. Bannon - 2011 - Environmental Philosophy 8 (1):121-124.
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  35. Seeing is (Not) Believing: Managing the Impressions of the Firm's Commitment to the Natural Environment. [REVIEW]Pratima Bansal & Geoffrey Kistruck - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):165 - 180.
    This paper examines stakeholder responses to impression management tactics used by firms that express environmental commitment. We inductively analyzed data from 98 open-ended questionnaires and identified two impression management tactics that led respondents to believe that a firm was credible in its commitment to the natural environment. Approximately, half of the respondents responded to illustrative impression management tactics that provide images of, and/or broad-brush comments about, the firm’s commitment to the natural environment. The other half responded to demonstrative impression management (...)
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  36. Exodus and Exile.Renaud Barbaras - 2014 - Environmental Philosophy 11 (1):45-57.
    This article aims at accounting for the difference between human and animal from a tension between two movements: an archi-movement which defines the way of being of the world and is life itself, and an archi-event of separation of the world from itself that affects life and is the source of living beings. Animal can be characterized by the fact that, in spite of being separated from the archi-life movement, the power of this movement prevails on the archi-event. This means (...)
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  37. James Lovelock, Gaia Theory, and the Rejection of Fact/Value Dualism.Pierluigi Barrotta - 2011 - Environmental Philosophy 8 (2):95-113.
    In this paper the relationship between Gaia theory and fact/value dualism must be understood from two angles: I shall use Gaia as a case study to show the philosophical limits of dualism, and I shall also use the discussion of fact/value dualism to clarify the contents of Gaia theory. My basic thesis is that Lovelock is right when rejecting the suggestion that he should clear his theory of evaluative considerations. He is right because in his theory facts and moral values (...)
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  38. Ingolfur Bluhdorn, Post-Ecologist Politics.J. Barry - 2004 - Environmental Values 13 (1):127-129.
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  39. Ecological Politics and Democratic Theory: The Challenge to the Deliberative Ideal.John Barry - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (1):115-121.
  40. Environment and Social Theory.John Barry - 2007 - Routledge.
    Environment and Social Theory provides a concise introduction to the relationship between the environment and social theory, both historically and within contemporary social theory.
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  41. Fatally Confused: Telling the Time in the Midst of Ecological Crises.Michelle Bastian - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):23-48.
    Focusing particularly on the role of the clock in social life, this article explores the conventions we use to “tell the time.” I argue that although clock time generally appears to be an all-encompassing tool for social coordination, it is actually failing to coordinate us with some of the most pressing ecological changes currently taking place. Utilizing philosophical approaches to performativity to explore what might be going wrong, I then draw on Derrida’s and Haraway’s understandings of social change in order (...)
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  42. Introduction to the Special Section: Integrating Development Ethics and Climate Change Ethics.Christian Becker & Donald Brown - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):37-42.
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  43. Debate: Intergenerational Equity and the Environment.Wilfred Beckerman - 1997 - Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (4):392–405.
  44. Teaching Ethics Ecologically in Advance.Jonathan Beever - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
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  45. The Ontology of Species: Commentary on Kasperbauer’s ‘Should We Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon? The Ethics of De-Extinction’.Jonathan Beever - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):18-20.
    Beneath important ethical questions about the impacts of de-extinct species on ecosystems and the potential harms to individual organisms lies a more fundamental assumption; namely, that the thing being "de-extinct-ed" is indeed a member of previously existing species. This is the ontological assumption: that genetic make-up of the individual is both a necessary and sufficient condition for species membership. Questioning this ontological assumption poses an even more critical challenge for de-extinction. Genes a member of a species do not make. They (...)
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  46. Bioethics and the Challenge of the Ecological Individual in Advance.Jonathan Beever & Nicolae Morar - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
    Questions of individuality are traditionally predicated upon recognizing discrete entities whose behavior can be measured and whose value and agency can be meaningfully ascribed. We consider a series of challenges to the metaphysical concept of individuality as the ground of the self. We argue that an ecological conception of individuality renders ascriptions of autonomy to selves highly improbable. We find conceptual resources in the work of environmental philosopher Arne Naess, whose distinction between shallow and deep responses helps us rethink the (...)
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  47. Forrest Clingerman and Mark H. Dixon, Editors. Placing Nature on the Borders of Religion, Philosophy and Ethics.Nathan M. Bell - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):201-204.
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  48. Courtyards: A Phenomenological Study.Robin Bellows - 2004 - Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):62-64.
    This essay is an edited version of a paper submitted for a third year, undergraduate course in Issues in Environmental Ethics, at the University of Toronto. The course aims to bring together thinking from the intersection of the fields of Continental and Environmental Philosophy.
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  49. Courtyards.Robin Bellows - 2004 - Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):62-64.
    This essay is an edited version of a paper submitted for a third year, undergraduate course in Issues in Environmental Ethics, at the University of Toronto. The course aims to bring together thinking from the intersection of the fields of Continental and Environmental Philosophy.
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  50. Living Up to Our Humanity: The Elevated Extinction Rate Event and What It Says About Us.Jeremy Bendik-Keymer - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):339-354.
    Either we are in an elevated extinction rate event or in a mass extinction. Scientists disagree, and the matter cannot be resolved empirically until it is too late. We are the cause of the elevated extinction rate. What does this say about us, we who are Homo sapiens—the wise hominid? Beginning with the Renaissance and spreading during the 18th century, the normative notion of humanity has arisen to stand for what expresses our dignity as humans—specifically our thoughtfulness, in the double (...)
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