11 found
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  1.  14
    Possible and Probable Languages: A Generative Perspective on Linguistic Typology.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In this important and pioneering book Frederick Newmeyer takes on the question of language variety. He considers why some language types are impossible and why some grammatical features are more common than others. The task of trying to explain typological variation among languages has been mainly undertaken by functionally-oriented linguists. Generative grammarians entering the field of typology in the 1980s put forward the idea that cross-linguistic differences could be explained by linguistic parameters within Universal Grammar, whose operation might vary from (...)
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  2.  57
    Form and Function in the Evolution of Grammar.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S2):259-276.
    This article focuses on claims about the origin and evolution of language from the point of view of the formalist–functionalist debate in linguistics. In linguistics, an account of a grammatical phenomenon is considered “formal” if it accords center stage to the structural properties of that phenomenon, and “functional” if it appeals to the language user's communicative needs or to domain‐general human capacities. The gulf between formalism and functionalism has been bridged in language evolution research, in that some leading formalists, Ray (...)
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  3.  33
    Natural selection and the autonomy of syntax.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):745-746.
  4.  17
    Chomsky and Usage‐Based Linguistics.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 2021 - In Nicholas Allott, Terje Lohndal & Georges Rey (eds.), A Companion to Chomsky. Wiley. pp. 287–304.
    This chapter attempts to unravel the differences, whether real or merely apparent, between Chomsky's linguistics and usage‐based linguistics (UBL). The principal alternative to generative grammar in the world today is a broad umbrella of approaches that fall under the general heading of UBL. UBL is the successor to a Piagetian approach to language acquisition, where experience and general learning principles shape the acquisition process. Functionalism takes the position that properties of grammatical systems are explicable in terms of properties of systems (...)
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  5.  7
    On Subject-Auxiliary Inversion and the notion “purely formal generalization”.Robert D. Borsley & Frederick J. Newmeyer - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (1).
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  6. American linguistics in transition: from post-Bloomfieldian structuralism to generative grammar.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 2022 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    This volume is devoted to a major chapter in the history of linguistics in the United States, the period from the 1930s to the 1980s. It offers detailed discussions of the key issues and developments in the transition from (post-Bloomfieldian) structural linguistics to early generative grammar.
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  7.  25
    Agent-assignment, tree-pruning, and broca's aphasia.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):44-45.
    I wholeheartedly endorse Grodzinsky's program of attempting to tie the particular deficits observed in Broca's aphasics' comprehension and production to changes in their mentally represented model of grammar. At the level of detail, however, I see problems with two specific changes that Grodzinsky posits. One is a default Agent-assignment strategy in comprehension. The other is the hypothesis that production involves pruning all functional projections above Agreement Phrase.
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  8.  21
    Conceptual structure and syntax.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):202-202.
    The syntactic structures of natural languages reflect conceptual categories more directly than they reflect communicative categories. This fact supports the main premise of the target article, namely, that the most important event in language evolution was the development of a hierarchical conceptual structure.
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  9.  22
    Müller's conclusions and linguistic research.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):641-642.
    Because Müiller fails to distinguish between two senses of the term “autonomy,” there is a danger that his results will be misinterpreted by both linguists and neuroscientists. Although he may very well have been successful in refuting one sense of autonomy, he may actually have helped to provide an explanation for the correctness of autonomy in its other sense.
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  10.  14
    On the Alleged Boundary between Syntax and Semantics.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 1970 - Foundations of Language 6 (2):178-186.
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  11.  22
    Some incorrect implications of the fullaccess hypothesis.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):736-737.
    If Epstein et al. are right that adult second language learners have full access to UG, then all of the following should be true: adults should be able to consciously transform their I-Language; adults should be able to transform pidgins into Creoles; adults should be as likely as children to restructure their grammars on the basis of “functional” pressure. All the foregoing are false, however, which seriously calls into question the correctness of their hypothesis.
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