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  1. Guage Library, 10.) Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1993. Pp. Viii, 419.Michael Aceto - 1994 - In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press. pp. 70--4.
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  2. Index of Names: Volume 22.F. Ackerman, G. Anscombe, H. Aristar-Dry, K. Bach, C. L. Baker & S. Bayer - 1999 - Linguistics and Philosophy 22 (6):681-687.
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  3. Linguistic Analysis and Epistemic Encounters.E. M. Adams - 1974 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (3):404-414.
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  4. Chomsky, P.Joseph Agassi - unknown
    Summary and conclusions As a new field, cognitivism began with the total rejection of the old, traditional views of language acquisition and of learning -- individual and collective alike. Chomsky was one of the pioneers in this respect, yet he clouds issues by excessive claim s for his originality and by not allowing the beginner in the art of the acquisition of language the use of learning by making hypotheses and testing them, though he acknowledges that researchers, himself included, do (...)
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  5. Evidentiality.A. I͡U Aĭkhenvalʹd - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    In some languages every statement must contain a specification of the type of evidence on which it is based: for example, whether the speaker saw it, or heard it, or inferred it from indirect evidence, or learnt it from someone else. This grammatical reference to information source is called 'evidentiality', and is one of the least described grammatical categories. Evidentiality systems differ in how complex they are: some distinguish just two terms (eyewitness and noneyewitness, or reported and everything else), while (...)
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  6. The Word.Ashok Aklujkar - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (4).
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  7. The Minimalist Program: The Nature and Plausibility of Chomsky's Biolinguistics.Fahad Rashed Al-Mutairi - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    The development of the Minimalist Program, Noam Chomsky's most recent generative model of linguistics, has been highly influential over the last twenty years. It has had significant implications not only for the conduct of linguistic analysis itself, but also for our understanding of the status of linguistics as a science. The reflections and analyses in this book contain insights into the strengths and the weaknesses of the MP. Among these are, a clarification of the content of the Strong Minimalist Thesis (...)
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  8. Linguistic Morphology in Relation to Thinking.H. G. Alexander - 1936 - Journal of Philosophy 33 (10):261-269.
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  9. Language Process and Hallucination Phenomenology.Murray Alpert - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):518.
  10. On the Role of Frame-Based Knowledge in Lexical Representation.József Andor - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):667-668.
    In this commentary I discuss the role of types of knowledge and conceptual structures in lexical representation, revealing the explanatory potential of frame-based knowledge. Although frame-based lexical semantics is not alien to the theoretical model outlined in Jackendoff's conceptual semantics, testing its relevance to the analysis of the lexical evidence presented in his book has been left out of consideration.
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  11. E-Z Reader's Assumptions About Lexical Processing: Not so Easy to Define the Two Stages of Word Identification?Sally Andrews - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):477-478.
    E-Z Reader's account of the interaction between oculomotor and cognitive processes depends critically on distinguishing between early and late stages of lexical processing, because this distinction allows saccadic programming to be decoupled from shifts of attention. Precisely specifying the nature of this distinction has important implications both for current models of lexical retrieval and for the development of E-Z Reader 8.
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  12. Countryman, M. 179 Chomsky, N. 258 Craft, WD 136,140 Cutting, JE 190.M. A. Arbib, R. Arnheim, S. Appell, F. Attneave, R. Battison, U. Bellugi, B. Borghuis, E. Brunswik, K. Buhler & L. Burke - 2002 - In Liliana Albertazzi (ed.), Unfolding Perceptual Continua. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. pp. 283.
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  13. Veranderungen der hahben-Relation.(Lunder Germanistische Forschungen, 44). Lund.Anthony Aristar - 1994 - In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press. pp. 70--1.
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  14. Anti-Anti-Cartesianism: Reply to Suart Shanker.Scott Atran & Ximena Lois - unknown
    There have been many criticisms of “nativism” in “Cartesian linguistics,” attacking positions that neither Chomsky nor any well-known generative grammarian has ever thought to defend. Shanker's polemic is no exception. It involves two spurious claims: Cartesian linguistics vitiates understanding language structure and use; nativism permits linguistic anthropology only to “validate” and “apply” generative principles. Briefly, Chomsky's outlines a language system, LS, of the human brain. LS reflexively discriminates and categorizes parts of the flux of human experience as “language,” and develops (...)
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  15. Cartesian Linguistics.R. J. B. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (3):539-539.
  16. Linguistics in Philosophy.R. J. B. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (4):757-757.
  17. Conscious Cognition and Blackboard Architectures.Bernard J. Baars - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):70-71.
    van der Velde & de Kamps make a case for neural blackboard architectures to address four questions raised by human language. Unfortunately, they neglect a sizable literature relating blackboard architectures to other fundamental cognitive questions, specifically consciousness and voluntary control. Called “global workspace theory,” this literature integrates a large body of brain and behavioral evidence to come to converging conclusions.
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  18. Source: Linguistics and Philosophy, Vol. 25, No. 5/6 (Dec., 2002), Pp. 531-544 Published By: Springer.Emmon Bach - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5/6):531-544.
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  19. Im Keller des Herzens: 38 Stimmen Zum Werk von Ingeborg Bachmann: Gedenkbuch Zum 38.Ingeborg Bachmann & Magdalena Tzaneva (eds.) - 2011 - Lidi.
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  20. The Logical Problem of Language Acquisition.C. L. Baker & John J. Mccarthy - 1981
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  21. On the Loci of Agreement: Inversion Constructions in Mapudungun.Mark Baker - manuscript
    “Languages are all the same, but not boringly so.” I think this is my own maxim, not one of the late great Kenneth Hale ’s. But it is nevertheless something that he taught me, by example, if not by explicit precept. Ken Hale believed passionately in a substantive notion of Universal Grammar that underlies all languages. But this did not blind him to the details—even the idiosyncrasies—of less-studied “local” languages. On the contrary, I believe it stimulated his famous zeal for (...)
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  22. On Zero Agreement and Polysynthesis.Mark Baker - manuscript
    Agreement morphology is the single most important way of satisfying this requirement, the other being incorporation. (1) implies that in a polysynthetic language like Mohawk, all verbs necessarily agreement with subjects, objects, and indirect objects, except for the special case when the direct object is incorporated into the verb. This accounts elegantly for paradigms like the following, found also in languages like Nahuatl and Chukchee.
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  23. The Creative Aspect of Language Use and Nonbiological Nativism.Mark Baker - manuscript
    The Cognitive Science era can be divided into two distinct periods with respect to the topic of innateness, at least from the viewpoint of the linguist. The first period, which began in the late 1950s and was characterized by the work of people like Chomsky and Fodor, argued for reviving a nativist position, in which a substantial amount of people’s knowledge of language was innate rather than learned by association or induction or analogy. This constituted a break with the empiricist/behaviorist/structuralist (...)
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  24. ERPs (Event-Related Potentials), Semantic Attribution, and Facial Expression of Emotions.M. Balconi & U. Pozzoli - 2003 - Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):63-80.
    ERPs (event-related potentials) correlates are largely used in cognitive psychology and specifically for analysis of semantic information processing. Previous research has underlined a strong correlation between a negative-ongoing wave (N400), more frontally distributed, and semantic linguistic or extra-linguistic anomalies. With reference to the extra-linguistic domain, our experiment analyzed ERP variation in a semantic task of comprehension of emotional facial expressions. The experiment explored the effect of expectancy violation when subjects observed congruous or incongruous emotional facial patterns. Four prototypical (anger, sadness, (...)
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  25. Linguistic Intuitions and Varieties of Ethical Naturalism.Stephen W. Ball - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (1):1-38.
  26. Aspects of Language Essays and Lectures on Philosophy of Language, Linguistic Philosophy, and Methodology of Linguistics. --.Yehoshua Bar-Hillel - 1970 - Magnes Press.
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  27. The Linguistic Philosophy of Noam Chomsky.Binoy Barman - 2014 - Philosophy and Progress 51 (1-2).
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  28. Speech and Gesture Are Mediated by Independent Systems.Anna M. Barrett, Anne L. Foundas & Kenneth M. Heilman - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):125-126.
    Arbib suggests that language emerged in direct relation to manual gestural communication, that Broca's area participates in producing and imitating gestures, and that emotional facial expressions contributed to gesture-language coevolution. We discuss functional and structural evidence supporting localization of the neuronal modules controlling limb praxis, speech and language, and emotional communication. Current evidence supports completely independent limb praxis and speech/language systems.
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  29. Grounded Cognition: Past, Present, and Future.Lawrence W. Barsalou - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):716-724.
    Thirty years ago, grounded cognition had roots in philosophy, perception, cognitive linguistics, psycholinguistics, cognitive psychology, and cognitive neuropsychology. During the next 20 years, grounded cognition continued developing in these areas, and it also took new forms in robotics, cognitive ecology, cognitive neuroscience, and developmental psychology. In the past 10 years, research on grounded cognition has grown rapidly, especially in cognitive neuroscience, social neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology, and developmental psychology. Currently, grounded cognition appears to be achieving increased acceptance throughout cognitive (...)
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  30. Perceptions of Perceptual Symbols.Lawrence W. Barsalou - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):637-660.
    Various defenses of amodal symbol systems are addressed, including amodal symbols in sensory-motor areas, the causal theory of concepts, supramodal concepts, latent semantic analysis, and abstracted amodal symbols. Various aspects of perceptual symbol systems are clarified and developed, including perception, features, simulators, category structure, frames, analogy, introspection, situated action, and development. Particular attention is given to abstract concepts, language, and computational mechanisms.
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  31. Propaganda and the Public Mind Conversations with Noam Chomsky.David Barsamian & Noam Chomsky - 2001
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  32. A Refutation of Frege's Context Principle?Aaron Barth - 2012 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):26-35.
    This paper explores the limitations of current empirical approaches to the philosophy of language in light of a recent criticism of Frege's context principle. According to this criticism, the context principle is in conflict with certain features of natural language use and this is held to undermine its application in Foundations of Arithmetic. I argue that this view is mistaken because the features with which the context principle is alleged to be in conflict are irrelevant to the principle's methodological significance (...)
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  33. Language and Being.Patrick K. Bastable - 1971 - Philosophical Studies 20:332-332.
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  34. Winfred P. Lehmann: Proto-Indo-European Phonology. Pp. Xv+129. Austin: University of Texas Press and Linguistic Society of America, 1952. Cloth, $4. [REVIEW]A. J. Beattie - 1954 - The Classical Review 4 (02):173-174.
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  35. Learnability and Psychologically Constrained Grammars.Richard Timothy Beckwith - 1988 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    The research reported here is a model of language acquisition that addresses how the child maps the input data into output. The project is presented as a response to certain learnability constraints on theories in developmental psycholinguistics. One of these constraints is the continuity of categories across development. Where other learnability models assume innate perception of syntactic categories , this simulation assumes that they are learned. ;The subjects were 11 mother-child dyads, who were videotaped in a laboratory playroom once a (...)
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  36. Linguistic Correlates of Self in Deceptive Oral Autobiographical Narratives.J. S. Bedwell, S. Gallagher, S. N. Whitten & S. M. Fiore - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):547-555.
    The current study collected orally-delivered autobiographical narratives from a sample of 44 undergraduate students. Participants were asked to produce both deceptive and non-deceptive versions of their narrative to two specific autobiographical question prompts while standing in front of a video camera. Narratives were then analyzed with Coh-Metrix software on 33 indices of linguistic cohesion. Following a Bonferroni correction for the large number of linguistic variables , results indicated that the deceptive narratives contained more explicit action verbs, less linguistic complexity, and (...)
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  37. Commentary: Gustave Guillaume Between Linguistics and Philosophy of Language: A New Point of View.Louis Begioni - 1st ed. 2016 - In Flavia Santoianni (ed.), The Concept of Time in Early Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Springer Verlag.
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  38. Noam Chomsky , The Science of Language. Interview with James McGilvray . Reviewed By.Christina Behme - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (2):100-103.
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  39. Thought Experiments and Semantic Competence.A. Benejam - 2003 - In Maria J. Frapolli & E. Romero (eds.), Meaning, Basic Self-Knowledge, and Mind. CSLI Publications.
  40. Two Types of Linguistic Philosophy.Gustav Bergmann - 1951 - Review of Metaphysics 5 (3):417 - 438.
  41. Is Linguistics Empirical?T. G. Bever, J. A. Fodor & W. Weksel - 1965 - Psychological Review 72 (6):493-500.
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  42. Identification.Shankara Bhat & N. D. - 1981 - Dravidian Linguistics Association.
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  43. Volitional Control in the Learning of Artificial Grammars.Peter A. Bibby & Geoffrey Underwood - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):757-758.
    Dienes & Perner argue that volitional control in artificial grammar learning is best understood in terms of the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge representations. We maintain that direct, explicit access to knowledge organised in a hierarchy of implicitness/explicitness is neither necessary nor sufficient to explain volitional control. People can invoke volitional control when their knowledge is implicit, as in the case of artificial grammar learning, and they can invoke volitional control when any part of their knowledge representation is implicit, (...)
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  44. Language in the Modular Mind? It’s a No-Brainer!Derek Bickerton - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):677-678.
    Although Carruthers’ proposals avoid some of the more obvious pitfalls that face analysts of the language-cognition relationship, they are needlessly complex and vitiated by his uncritical acceptance of a highly modular variety of evolutionary psychology. He pays insufficient attention both to the neural substrate of the processes he hypothesizes and to the evolutionary developments that gave rise to both language and human cognition.
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  45. Rhetorical and Historical Aspects of Attitudes: The Case of the British Monarchy.Michael Billig - 1988 - Philosophical Psychology 1 (1):83 – 103.
    This paper seeks to develop the rhetorical approach to the study of social psychology, by looking at the rhetorical aspects of British attitudes towards the monarchy. The rhetorical approach stresses that attitudes are stances in public controversy and, as such, must be understood in their wider historical and argumentative context. Changes in this context can lead to changes in attitudinal expression, such as the phenomenon of Taking the Side of the Other, which should be distinguished from the sort of attitudinal (...)
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  46. Problems of Typological and Genetic Linguistics Viewed in a Generative Framework.Henrik Birnbaum - 1976 - Foundations of Language 14 (4):625-626.
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  47. Functional Answers Without Construction-Specific Rules.Maria Bittner - forthcoming - Linguistics and Philosophy.
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  48. Preschoolers Are Sensitive to the Speaker's Knowledge When Learning Proper Names.Paul Bloom - manuscript
    Unobservable properties that are specific to individuals, such as their proper names, can only be known by people who are familiar with those individuals. Do young children utilize this “familiarity principle” when learning language? Experiment 1 tested whether forty-eight 2- to 4-year-old children were able to determine the referent of a proper name such as “Jessie” based on the knowledge that the speaker was familiar with one individual but unfamiliar with the other. Even 2-year-olds successfully identified Jessie as the individual (...)
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  49. Précis of How Children Learn the Meanings of Words.Paul Bloom - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1095-1103.
    Normal children learn tens of thousands of words, and do so quickly and efficiently, often in highly impoverished environments. In How Children Learn the Meanings of Words, I argue that word learning is the product of certain cognitive and linguistic abilities that include the ability to acquire concepts, an appreciation of syntactic cues to meaning, and a rich understanding of the mental states of other people. These capacities are powerful, early emerging, and to some extent uniquely human, but they are (...)
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  50. Children's Knowledge of Binding and Conference: Evidence From Spontaneous Speech.Paul Bloom, Andrew Barss, Janet Nicol & Laura Conway - 1994 - Language 70 (1):53-71.
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