This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

271 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 271
  1. added 2019-01-10
    The Human Revolution: Editorial Introduction to 'Honest Fakes and Language Origins' by Chris Knight.Charles Whitehead - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):226-235.
    It is now more than twenty years since Knight (1987) first presented his paradigm-shifting theory of how and why the ‘human revolution’ occurred — and had to occur — in modern humans who, as climates dried under ice age conditions and African rainforests shrank, found themselves surrounded by vast prairies and savannahs, with rich herds of game animals roaming across them. The temptation for male hunters, far from any home base, to eat the best portions of meat at the kill (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2018-08-10
    The Onomastic Evidence for Bronze-Age West Semitic.M. O'Connor - 2004 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (3):439-470.
  3. added 2018-06-28
    On the Origin of Language.Marcello Barbieri - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (2):201-223.
    Thomas Sebeok and Noam Chomsky are the acknowledged founding fathers of two research fields which are known respectively as Biosemiotics and Biolinguistics and which have been developed in parallel during the past 50 years. Both fields claim that language has biological roots and must be studied as a natural phenomenon, thus bringing to an end the old divide between nature and culture. In addition to this common goal, there are many other important similarities between them. Their definitions of language, for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  4. added 2018-06-28
    Afferent Isn't Efferent, and Language Isn't Logic, Either.Derek Bickerton - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):286-287.
    Hurford's argument suffers from two major weaknesses. First, his account of neural mechanisms suggests no place in the brain where the two halves of a predicate-argument structure could come together. Second, his assumption that language and cognition must be based on logic is neither necessary nor particularly plausible, and leads him to some unlikely conclusions.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2018-06-28
    Is Preadaptation for Language a Necessary Assumption?David J. Bryant - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):183-184.
    Preadaptation for language is an unnecessary assumption because intermediate stages of linguistic ability are possible and adaptive. Language could have evolved through gradual selection from structures exhibiting few features associated with modern structures. Without physical evidence pertaining to language ability in prehabilis hominids, it remains possible that selective pressures for language use preceded and necessitated modern neurolinguistic structures.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6. added 2018-06-28
    Putting Cognitive Carts Before Linguistic Horses.Derek Bickerton - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):749.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  7. added 2018-06-28
    What Does Language Acquisition Tell Us About Language Evolution?Paul Bloom - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):553-554.
  8. added 2018-06-28
    Sensory Templates: Mechanism or Metaphor?Johan Bolhuis & Mark Johnson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):349-350.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2018-06-28
    Linguistic Function and Linguistic Evolution.George A. Broadwell - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):728-729.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. added 2018-06-28
    The Supremacy of Syntax.Derek Bickerton - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):658.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. added 2018-06-28
    A Bioprogram for Language: Not Whether but How?Lois Bloom - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):190.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2018-06-28
    The Language Bioprogram Hypothesis.Derek Bickerton - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):173.
  13. added 2018-06-21
    Darwin and the Linguists: The Coevolution of Mind and Language, Part 2. The Language–Thought Relationship.Stephen G. Alter - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (1):38-50.
  14. added 2018-06-19
    Etienne Bonnot de Condillac.Christopher Gauker - 2017 - In Margaret Cameron, Benjamin Hill & Robert Stainton (eds.), Sourcebook in the History of Philosophy of Language. Switzerland: Springer. pp. 773-774.
    This is a brief summary of Condillac's philosophy of language in his Origins of Human Knowledge.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2018-06-13
    Icon Index Symbol.Albert Atkin - 2010 - In Patrick Colm Hogan (ed.), The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of the Language Sciences. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 367-8.
  16. added 2018-05-23
    Where Did Language Come From? Connecting Sign, Song, and Speech in Hominin Evolution.Anton Killin - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):759-778.
    Recently theorists have developed competing accounts of the origins and nature of protolanguage and the subsequent evolution of language. Debate over these accounts is lively. Participants ask: Is music a direct precursor of language? Were the first languages gestural? Or is language continuous with primate vocalizations, such as the alarm calls of vervets? In this article I survey the leading hypotheses and lines of evidence, favouring a largely gestural conception of protolanguage. However, the “sticking point” of gestural accounts, to use (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. added 2018-04-30
    The Language Animal: The Full Shape of the Human Linguistic Capacity by Charles Taylor , X + 352 Pp.Stewart Clem - 2018 - Modern Theology 34 (2):297-299.
    Review of Charles Taylor, The Language Animal.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. added 2018-04-23
    Ambiguous Signals, Partial Beliefs, and Propositional Content.Rafael Ventura - forthcoming - Synthese:1-18.
    As the content of propositional attitudes, propositions are usually taken to help explain the behavior of rational agents. However, a closer look at signaling games suggests otherwise: rational agents often acquire partial beliefs, and many of their signals are ambiguous. Signaling games also suggest that it is rational for agents to mix their behavior in response to partial beliefs and ambiguous signals. But as I show in this paper, propositions cannot help explain the mixing behavior of rational agents: to explain (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. added 2018-03-23
    On Salience and Signaling in Sender–Receiver Games: Partial Pooling, Learning, and Focal Points.Travis LaCroix - forthcoming - Synthese.
    I introduce an extension of the Lewis-Skyrms signaling game, analysed from a dynamical perspective via simple reinforcement learning. In Lewis’ (Convention, Blackwell, Oxford, 1969) conception of a signaling game, salience is offered as an explanation for how individuals may come to agree upon a linguistic convention. Skyrms (Signals: evolution, learning & information, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2010a) offers a dynamic explanation of how signaling conventions might arise presupposing no salience whatsoever. The extension of the atomic signaling game examined here—which I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. added 2018-02-17
    The Evolution of Language as Controlled Collectivity.Joanna Raczaszek-Leonardi & Stephen J. Cowley - 2012 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 13 (1):1-16.
  21. added 2018-01-19
    Symbols Are Not Uniquely Human.Sidarta Ribeiro, Angelo Loula, Ivan Araújo, Ricardo Gudwin & Joao Queiroz - 2006 - Biosystems 90 (1):263-272.
    Modern semiotics is a branch of logics that formally defines symbol-based communication. In recent years, the semiotic classification of signs has been invoked to support the notion that symbols are uniquely human. Here we show that alarm-calls such as those used by African vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops), logically satisfy the semiotic definition of symbol. We also show that the acquisition of vocal symbols in vervet monkeys can be successfully simulated by a computer program based on minimal semiotic and neurobiological constraints. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22. added 2018-01-17
    Dicent Symbols in Non-Human Semiotic Processes.João Queiroz - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):319-329.
    Against the view that symbol-based semiosis is a human cognitive uniqueness, we have argued that non-human primates such as African vervet monkeys possess symbolic competence, as formally defined by Charles S. Peirce. Here I develop this argument by showing that the equivocal role ascribed to symbols by “folk semiotics” stems from an incomplete application of the Peircean logical framework for the classification of signs, which describes three kinds of symbols: rheme, dicent and argument. In an attempt to advance in the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. added 2018-01-11
    Firefly Femmes Fatales: A Case Study in the Semiotics of Deception.Charbel N. El-Hani, João Queiroz & Frederik Stjernfelt - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (1):33-55.
    Mimicry and deception are two important issues in studies about animal communication. The reliability of animal signs and the problem of the benefits of deceiving in sign exchanges are interesting topics in the evolution of communication. In this paper, we intend to contribute to an understanding of deception by studying the case of aggressive signal mimicry in fireflies, investigated by James Lloyd. Firefly femmes fatales are specialized in mimicking the mating signals of other species of fireflies with the purpose of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24. added 2017-11-21
    The Way a Language Changes: How Historical Semantics Helps Us to Understand the Emergence of the English Exchequer.Ulla Kypta - 2015 - Contributions to the History of Concepts 10 (2):29-47.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. added 2017-10-23
    Social Cognition, Stag Hunts, and the Evolution of Language.Richard Moore - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):797-818.
    According to the socio-cognitive revolution hypothesis, humans but not other great apes acquire language because only we possess the socio-cognitive abilities required for Gricean communication, which is a pre-requisite of language development. On this view, language emerged only following a socio-cognitive revolution in the hominin lineage that took place after the split of the Pan-Homo clade. In this paper, I argue that the SCR hypothesis is wrong. The driving forces in language evolution were not sweeping biologically driven changes to hominin (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. added 2017-08-07
    Mental Evolution: A Review of Daniel Dennett’s From Bacteria to Bach and Back. [REVIEW]Charles Rathkopf - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):1355-1368.
    From Bacteria To Bach and Back is an ambitious book that attempts to integrate a theory about the evolution of the human mind with another theory about the evolution of human culture. It is advertised as a defense of memes, but conceptualizes memes more liberally than has been done before. It is also advertised as a defense of the proposal that natural selection operates on culture, but conceptualizes natural selection as a process in which nearly all interesting parameters are free (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. added 2017-07-13
    Creating Reality.Bruce Bokor - manuscript
    Our commonsense notion of reality is supported by two critical assumptions for which we have little understanding: The conscious experience which underpins the observations integral to the scientific method and language, which is the method by which all theories, scientific or otherwise, are communicated. This book examines both of these matters in detail and arrives at a new theoretical foundation for understanding how nature undertakes the task of building the universe. -/- Creating Reality is a synthesis of Darwin’s The Origin (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. added 2017-02-14
    Language: Communication and Human Behavior: The Linguistic Essays of William Diver.Alan Huffman & Joseph Davis (eds.) - 2011 - Brill.
    In these newly edited, annotated, and contextualized foundational linguistic works, many previously unpublished, the late William Diver of Columbia University radically analyzes language as a structure shaped by communicative function and by characteristics of its human users.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. added 2017-02-13
    " From Hand to Mouth. The Origins of Language", de Michael C. Corballis.Guillermo José Lorenzo González - 2004 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):237-240.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. added 2017-02-13
    And the Evolution of Particulate Speech.Michael Studdert-Kennedy - 2002 - In Maxim I. Stamenov & Vittorio Gallese (eds.), Mirror Neurons and the Evolution of Brain and Language. John Benjamins. pp. 42--207.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. added 2017-02-13
    Preliminaries to Discussing How Language Helps Us Think.Ray Jackendoff - 1996 - Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):197-213.
  32. added 2017-02-11
    Talking and Thinking About Nature Roots, Evolution, and Future Prospects.Dudley Shapere - 1992 - Dialectica 46 (3‐4):281-296.
    SummaryThe topic of this symposium gives rise to questions like these: How do we come to talk about nature in the way we do in science? In particular, what, precisely, are the relations between the “technical” language of science and the language we use in our everyday talk about the world and its contents? How, if at all, does the language of everyday life influence the language of science? In order to confront them, it is necessary first to clarify the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. added 2017-02-09
    On Woodger's Analysis of Biological Language.R. M. Martin - 1954 - Review of Metaphysics 8 (2):325 - 333.
  34. added 2017-02-05
    Convergent Minds: Ostension, Inference, and Grice’s Third Clause.Richard Moore - 2017 - Interface Focus 7 (3).
    A prevailing view is that while human communication has an ‘ostensive-inferential’ or ‘Gricean’ intentional structure, animal communication does not. This would make the psychological states that support human and animal forms of communication fundamentally different. Against this view, I argue that there are grounds to expect ostensive communication in non-human clades. This is because it is sufficient for ostensive communication that one intentionally address one’s utterance to one’s intended interlocutor – something that is both a functional pre-requisite of successful communication (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35. added 2017-02-03
    Interfaces of the Word: Studies in the Evolution of Consciousness and Culture.Walter J. Ong - 1977 - Cornell University Press.
  36. added 2017-02-02
    H o M | F E E D B a C.Gunther Witzany - manuscript
    Manfred Eigen employs the terms language and communication to explain key recombination processes of DNA as well as to explain the self-organization of human language and communication: Life processes as well as language and communication processes are governed by the logic of a molecular syntax, which is the exact depiction of a principally formalizable reality.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. added 2017-01-28
    The Origin and Function of the Aesthetic Sign.Richard van Oort - 2002 - Dissertation, University of California, Irvine
    My hypothesis is that the aesthetic function of language is the paradoxical negation and deferral of indexical reference. Taking C. S. Peirce's semiotic categories of icon, index, and symbol, I show how these possess a wider evolutionary significance by referring to the important work of Terrence Deacon, who proposes that language---symbolic reference---can only be seen as an evolutionary anomaly when viewed from the perspective of indexical reference. Indexical reference is a more basic communicative mode than symbolic reference, and it structures (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. added 2017-01-27
    Do They Speak Language?Lucie Čadková - 2015 - Biosemiotics 8 (1):9-27.
    The question: are humans the only animals endowed with language? must be preceded by the question: what makes language a unique communication system? The American linguist Charles F. Hockett answers the second question by listing what he considers the criteria that differentiate language from other communication systems. His ‘design-feature’ approach, first presented in 1958, has become a popular tool by which the communication systems of non-human animals are guaranteed a priori exclusion from the notion of language. However, the results of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. added 2017-01-26
    Language and Thought in Evolutionary Perspective.R. A. Foley - 1995 - In Ian Hodder (ed.), Interpreting Archaeology: Finding Meaning in the Past. Routledge. pp. 76--80.
  40. added 2017-01-25
    Constraining the Time When Language Evolved.Sverker Johansson - 2011 - Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 10:45-59.
  41. added 2017-01-24
    A Language of Their Own: An Interactionist Approach to Human-Horse Communication.Keri Brandt - 2004 - Society and Animals 12 (4):299-316.
    This paper explores the process of human-horse communication using ethnographic data of in-depth interviews and participant observation. Guided by symbolic interactionism, the paper argues that humans and horses co-create a language system by way of the body to facilitate the creation of shared meaning. This research challenges the privileged status of verbal language and suggests that non-verbal communication and language systems of the body have their own unique complexities. This investigation of humanhorse communication offers new possibilities to understand the subjective (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  42. added 2017-01-23
    The Swashbuckling Anthropologist: Henrich on The Secret of Our Success. [REVIEW]Ellen Clarke & Cecilia Heyes - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (2):289-305.
    In The Secret of Our Success, Joseph Henrich claims that human beings are unique—different from all other animals—because we engage in cumulative cultural evolution. It is the technological and social products of cumulative cultural evolution, not the intrinsic rationality or ‘smartness’ of individual humans, that enable us to live in a huge range of different habitats, and to dominate most of the creatures who share those habitats with us. We are sympathetic to this general view, the latest expression of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43. added 2017-01-21
    Symposium on “A Multi-Methodological Approach to Language Evolution”.Angelo Cangelosi - 2008 - Mind and Society 7 (1):35-41.
    This symposium includes a selection of articles on the origins and evolution of language. These are extended version of selected papers presented at “EVOLANG6: The Sixth International Conference on the Evolution of Language” that was held in Rome in April 2006. This selection of papers provides a multi-methodological view of different approaches to, and theoretical explanations of, the evolution of language.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. added 2017-01-21
    Development and Evolution in Human Vocal Communication.D. Kimbrough Oller - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (4):349-351.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. added 2017-01-21
    Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy,Origins of Complex Language. An Inquiry Into the Evolutionary Beginnings of Sentences, Syllables, and Truth.Wolfram Hinzen - 2003 - Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (6):765-780.
  46. added 2017-01-21
    Syntax as an Emergent Characteristic of the Evolution of Semantic Complexity.P. Thomas Schoenemann - 1999 - Minds and Machines 9 (3):309-346.
    It is commonly argued that the rules of language, as distinct from its semantic features, are the characteristics which most clearly distinguish language from the communication systems of other species. A number of linguists (e.g., Chomsky 1972, 1980; Pinker 1994) have suggested that the universal features of grammar (UG) are unique human adaptations showing no evolutionary continuities with any other species. However, recent summaries of the substantive features of UG are quite remarkable in the very general nature of the features (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  47. added 2017-01-21
    Communication and the Evolution of Ecosystem.Li Jianhua - 1998 - World Futures 52 (1):35-73.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. added 2017-01-20
    The Origins of Meaning: Language in the Light of Evolution.Felipe De Brigard - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):529 – 533.
  49. added 2017-01-20
    Language Enabled by Baldwinian Evolution of Memory Capacity.Thomas K. Landauer - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):526-527.
    The claim that language is shaped by the brain is weakened by lack of clear specification of what necessary and sufficient properties the brain actually imposes. To account for human intellectual superiority, it is proposed that language did require special brain evolution (Deacon 1997), but that what evolved was a merely quantitative change rather than a radically new invention.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. added 2017-01-20
    Words Are Not Costly Displays: Shortcomings of a Testosterone-Fuelled Model of Language Evolution.Chris Knight & Camilla Power - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):290-291.
    Only by misconstruing the term performative are the authors able to argue that males surpass females in “performative applications” of language. Linguistic performatives are not costly displays of quality, and syntax cannot be explained as an outcome of behavioural competition between pubertal males. However, there is room for a model in which language co-evolves with the unique human life-history stage of adolescence.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 271