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  1.  35
    Knowing Words: Wisdom and Cunning in the Classical Traditions of China and Greece.Lisa Ann Raphals - 1992 - Cornell University Press.
    Knowing Words will be welcomed by sinologists, classicists, and scholars of comparative philosophy and literature.
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  2. Fate, Fortune, Chance, and Luck in Chinese and Greek: A Comparative Semantic History.Lisa Ann Raphals - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (4):537-574.
    : The semantic fields and root metaphors of "fate" in Classical Greece and pre-Buddhist China are surveyed here. The Chinese material focuses on the Warring States, the Han, and the reinvention of the earlier lexicon in contemporary Chinese terms for such concepts as risk, randomness, and (statistical) chance. The Greek study focuses on Homer, Parmenides, the problem of fate and necessity, Platonic daimons, and the "On Fate" topos in Hellenistic Greece. The study ends with a brief comparative metaphorology of metaphors (...)
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  3.  8
    Skill in Ancient Ethics: The Legacy of China, Greece and Rome.Tom P. S. Angier & Lisa Ann Raphals (eds.) - 2021 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This collection illustrates the centrality of skill within ancient ethics, including ancient Chinese ethics, showing how skill or techne has been a touchstone from the beginning of philosophical thought. Covering Socrates' search for expertise in virtue, the Republic's 'craft of justice', Aristotle's delineation of the politike techne and the Stoics' 'art of life'. Divided into four sections on Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and Chinese ethics, it brings together world-leading philosophers working across this broad topic. Yet it is not limited to (...)
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  4. A Tripartite Self: Mind, Body, and Spirit in Early China.Lisa Ann Raphals - 2023 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    Chinese philosophy has long recognized the importance of the body and emotions in extensive and diverse self-cultivation traditions. Philosophical debates about the relationship between mind and body are often described in terms of mind-body dualism and its opposite, monism or some kind of "holism." Monist or holist views agree on the unity of mind and body, but with much debate about what kind, whereas mind-body dualists take body and mind to be metaphysically distinct entities. The question is important for several (...)
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